Wellcome Trust Sanger Center

Cambridge, United Kingdom

Wellcome Trust Sanger Center

Cambridge, United Kingdom
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Holt K.E.,University of Melbourne | Wertheim H.,University of Oxford | Zadoks R.N.,Cornell University | Zadoks R.N.,University of Glasgow | And 31 more authors.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America | Year: 2015

Klebsiella pneumoniae is nowrecognized as an urgent threat to human health because of the emergence of multidrug-resistant strains associated with hospital outbreaks and hypervirulent strains associated with severe community-acquired infections. K. pneumoniae is ubiquitous in the environment and can colonize and infect both plants and animals. However, little is known about the population structure of K. pneumoniae, so it is difficult to recognize or understand the emergence of clinically important clones within this highly genetically diverse species. Here we present a detailed genomic framework for K. pneumoniae based on whole-genome sequencing of more than 300 human and animal isolates spanning four continents. Our data provide genomewide support for the splitting of K. pneumoniae into three distinct species, KpI (K. pneumoniae), KpII (K. quasipneumoniae), and KpIII (K. variicola). Further, for K. pneumoniae (KpI), the entity most frequently associated with human infection, we show the existence of >150 deeply branching lineages including numerousmultidrug-resistant or hypervirulent clones.We show K. pneumoniae has a large accessory genome approaching 30,000 protein-coding genes, including a number of virulence functions that are significantly associated with invasive community-acquired disease in humans. In our dataset, antimicrobial resistance genes were common among human carriage isolates and hospital-acquired infections, which generally lacked the genes associated with invasive disease. The convergence of virulence and resistance genes potentially could lead to the emergence of untreatable invasive K. pneumoniae infections; our data provide the whole-genome framework against which to track the emergence of such threats.


Ghansah A.,University of Ghana | Rockett K.A.,Oxford Genetics | Clark T.G.,London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine | Wilson M.D.,University of Ghana | And 10 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2012

Background: Haemoglobin S (HbS) and C (HbC) are variants of the HBB gene which both protect against malaria. It is not clear, however, how these two alleles have evolved in the West African countries where they co-exist at high frequencies. Here we use haplotypic signatures of selection to investigate the evolutionary history of the malaria-protective alleles HbS and HbC in the Kassena-Nankana District (KND) of Ghana. Methodology/Principal Findings: The haplotypic structure of HbS and HbC alleles was investigated, by genotyping 56 SNPs around the HBB locus. We found that, in the KND population, both alleles reside on extended haplotypes (approximately 1.5 Mb for HbS and 650 Kb for HbC) that are significantly less diverse than those of the ancestral HbA allele. The extended haplotypes span a recombination hotspot that is known to exist in this region of the genome Significance: Our findings show strong support for recent positive selection of both the HbS and HbC alleles and provide insights into how these two alleles have both evolved in the population of northern Ghana. © 2012 Ghansah et al.


Kersey P.J.,European Bioinformatics Institute | Allen J.E.,European Bioinformatics Institute | Christensen M.,European Bioinformatics Institute | Davis P.,European Bioinformatics Institute | And 30 more authors.
Nucleic Acids Research | Year: 2014

Ensembl Genomes (http://www.ensemblgenomes.org) is an integrating resource for genome-scale data from non-vertebrate species. The project exploits and extends technologies for genome annotation, analysis and dissemination, developed in the context of the vertebrate-focused Ensembl project, and provides a complementary set of resources for non-vertebrate species through a consistent set of programmatic and interactive interfaces. These provide access to data including reference sequence, gene models, transcriptional data, polymorphisms and comparative analysis. This article provides an update to the previous publications about the resource, with a focus on recent developments. These include the addition of important new genomes (and related data sets) including crop plants, vectors of human disease and eukaryotic pathogens. In addition, the resource has scaled up its representation of bacterial genomes, and now includes the genomes of over 9000 bacteria. Specific extensions to the web and programmatic interfaces have been developed to support users in navigating these large data sets. Looking forward, analytic tools to allow targeted selection of data for visualization and download are likely to become increasingly important in future as the number of available genomes increases within all domains of life, and some of the challenges faced in representing bacterial data are likely to become commonplace for eukaryotes in future. © 2013 The Author(s). Published by Oxford University Press.


Connor T.R.,University of Cardiff | Connor T.R.,Wellcome Trust Sanger Center | Barker C.R.,University of Cardiff | Baker K.S.,Wellcome Trust Sanger Center | And 22 more authors.
eLife | Year: 2015

Shigella flexneri is the most common cause of bacterial dysentery in low-income countries. Despite this, S. flexneri remains largely unexplored from a genomic standpoint and is still described using a vocabulary based on serotyping reactions developed over half-a-century ago. Here we combine whole genome sequencing with geographical and temporal data to examine the natural history of the species. Our analysis subdivides S. flexneri into seven phylogenetic groups (PGs); each containing twoor- more serotypes and characterised by distinct virulence gene complement and geographic range. Within the S. flexneri PGs we identify geographically restricted sub-lineages that appear to have persistently colonised regions for many decades to over 100 years. Although we found abundant evidence of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) determinant acquisition, our dataset shows no evidence of subsequent intercontinental spread of antimicrobial resistant strains. The pattern of colonisation and AMR gene acquisition suggest that S. flexneri has a distinct life-cycle involving local persistence. © Connor et al.


Santarius T.,Wellcome Trust Sanger Center | Shipley J.,Institute of Cancer Research | Brewer D.,Institute of Cancer Research | Stratton M.R.,Wellcome Trust Sanger Center
Nature Reviews Cancer | Year: 2010

Integrated genome-wide screens of DNA copy number and gene expression in human cancers have accelerated the rate of discovery of amplified and overexpressed genes. However, the biological importance of most of the genes identified in such studies remains unclear. In this Analysis, we propose a weight-of-evidence based classification system for identifying individual genes in amplified regions that are selected for during tumour development. In a census of the published literature we have identified 77 genes for which there is good evidence of involvement in the development of human cancer. © 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.


Foster T.L.,King's College London | Wilson H.,King's College London | Iyer S.S.,University of Pennsylvania | Coss K.,King's College London | And 7 more authors.
Cell Host and Microbe | Year: 2016

Interferon-induced transmembrane proteins (IFITMs) restrict the entry of diverse enveloped viruses through incompletely understood mechanisms. While IFITMs are reported to inhibit HIV-1, their in vivo relevance is unclear. We show that IFITM sensitivity of HIV-1 strains is determined by the co-receptor usage of the viral envelope glycoproteins as well as IFITM subcellular localization within the target cell. Importantly, we find that transmitted founder HIV-1, which establishes de novo infections, is uniquely resistant to the antiviral activity of IFITMs. However, viral sensitivity to IFITMs, particularly IFITM2 and IFITM3, increases over the first 6 months of infection, primarily as a result of neutralizing antibody escape mutations. Additionally, the ability to evade IFITM restriction contributes to the different interferon sensitivities of transmitted founder and chronic viruses. Together, these data indicate that IFITMs constitute an important barrier to HIV-1 transmission and that escape from adaptive immune responses exposes the virus to antiviral restriction. © 2016 The Author(s)


Deaton A.M.,University of Edinburgh | Webb S.,University of Edinburgh | Kerr A.R.W.,University of Edinburgh | Illingworth R.S.,University of Edinburgh | And 3 more authors.
Genome Research | Year: 2011

Human and mouse genomes contain a similar number of CpG islands (CGIs), which are discrete CpG-rich DNA sequences associated with transcription start sites. In both species, ∼50% of all CGIs are remote from annotated promoters but, nevertheless, often have promoter-like features. To determine the role of CGI methylation in cell differentiation, we analyzed DNA methylation at a comprehensive CGI set in cells of the mouse hematopoietic lineage. Using a method that potentially detects ∼33%of genomic CpGs in the methylated state, we found that large differences in gene expression were accompanied by surprisingly few DNA methylation changes. There were, however, many DNA methylation differences between hematopoietic cells and a distantly related tissue, brain. Altered DNA methylation in the immune system occurred predominantly at CGIs within gene bodies, which have the properties of cell type-restricted promoters, but infrequently at annotated gene promoters or CGI flanking sequences (CGI "shores"). Unexpectedly, elevated intragenic CGI methylation correlated with silencing of the associated gene. Differentially methylated intragenic CGIs tended to lack H3K4me3 and associate with a transcriptionally repressive environment regardless of methylation state. Our results indicate that DNA methylation changes play a relatively minor role in the late stages of differentiation and suggest that intragenic CGIs represent regulatory sites of differential gene expression during the early stages of lineage specification. © 2011 by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.


PubMed | University of Witwatersrand, Global Evaluative science Inc., Public Health England, Wellcome Trust Sanger Center and 7 more.
Type: | Journal: eLife | Year: 2015

Shigella flexneri is the most common cause of bacterial dysentery in low-income countries. Despite this, S. flexneri remains largely unexplored from a genomic standpoint and is still described using a vocabulary based on serotyping reactions developed over half-a-century ago. Here we combine whole genome sequencing with geographical and temporal data to examine the natural history of the species. Our analysis subdivides S. flexneri into seven phylogenetic groups (PGs); each containing two-or-more serotypes and characterised by distinct virulence gene complement and geographic range. Within the S. flexneri PGs we identify geographically restricted sub-lineages that appear to have persistently colonised regions for many decades to over 100 years. Although we found abundant evidence of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) determinant acquisition, our dataset shows no evidence of subsequent intercontinental spread of antimicrobial resistant strains. The pattern of colonisation and AMR gene acquisition suggest that S. flexneri has a distinct life-cycle involving local persistence.


PubMed | University of Montréal, University of Pennsylvania, University of Oxford, Wellcome Trust Sanger Center and King's College London
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Cell host & microbe | Year: 2016

Interferon-induced transmembrane proteins (IFITMs) restrict the entry of diverse enveloped viruses through incompletely understood mechanisms. While IFITMs are reported to inhibit HIV-1, their invivo relevance isunclear. We show that IFITM sensitivity of HIV-1 strains is determined by the co-receptor usage of the viral envelope glycoproteins as well as IFITM subcellular localization within the target cell. Importantly, we find that transmitted founder HIV-1, which establishes de novo infections, is uniquely resistant to the antiviral activity of IFITMs. However, viral sensitivity to IFITMs, particularly IFITM2 and IFITM3, increases over the first 6months of infection, primarily as a result of neutralizing antibody escape mutations. Additionally, the ability to evade IFITM restriction contributes to the different interferon sensitivities of transmitted founder and chronic viruses. Together, these data indicate that IFITMs constitute an important barrier to HIV-1 transmission and that escape from adaptive immune responses exposes the virus to antiviral restriction.


PubMed | Teagasc, University of Verona, Inner Mongolia Agricultural University, University of Helsinki and 6 more.
Type: | Journal: Nature communications | Year: 2015

Lactobacilli are a diverse group of species that occupy diverse nutrient-rich niches associated with humans, animals, plants and food. They are used widely in biotechnology and food preservation, and are being explored as therapeutics. Exploiting lactobacilli has been complicated by metabolic diversity, unclear species identity and uncertain relationships between them and other commercially important lactic acid bacteria. The capacity for biotransformations catalysed by lactobacilli is an untapped biotechnology resource. Here we report the genome sequences of 213 Lactobacillus strains and associated genera, and their encoded genetic catalogue for modifying carbohydrates and proteins. In addition, we describe broad and diverse presence of novel CRISPR-Cas immune systems in lactobacilli that may be exploited for genome editing. We rationalize the phylogenomic distribution of host interaction factors and bacteriocins that affect their natural and industrial environments, and mechanisms to withstand stress during technological processes. We present a robust phylogenomic framework of existing species and for classifying new species.

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