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Sudol M.,Weis Center for Research | Sudol M.,Mount Sinai School of Medicine | Shields D.C.,University College Dublin | Farooq A.,University of Miami
Seminars in Cell and Developmental Biology | Year: 2012

YAP (Yes-associated protein) is a potent oncogene and a major effector of the mammalian Hippo tumor suppressor pathway. In this review, our emphasis is on the structural basis of how YAP recognizes its various cellular partners. In particular, we discuss the role of LATS kinase and AMOTL1 junction protein, two key cellular partners of YAP that bind to its WW domain, in mediating cytoplasmic localization of YAP and thereby playing a key role in the regulation of its transcriptional activity. Importantly, the crystal structure of an amino-terminal domain of YAP in complex with the carboxy-terminal domain of TEAD transcription factor was only recently solved at atomic resolution, while the structure of WW domain of YAP in complex with a peptide containing the PPxY motif has been available for more than a decade. We discuss how such structural information may be exploited for the rational development of novel anti-cancer therapeutics harboring greater efficacy coupled with low toxicity. We also embark on a brief discussion of how recent in silico studies led to identification of the cardiac glycoside digitoxin as a potential modulator of WW domain-ligand interactions. Conversely, dobutamine was identified in a screen of known drugs as a compound that promotes cytoplasmic localization of YAP, thereby resulting in growth suppressing activity. Finally, we discuss how a recent study on the dynamics of WW domain folding on a biologically critical time scale may provide a tool to generate repertoires of WW domain variants for regulation of the Hippo pathway toward desired, non-oncogenic outputs. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Shareef M.M.,University of Miami | Udayakumar T.S.,University of Miami | Sinha V.K.,University of Miami | Saleem S.M.,University of Kentucky | Griggs W.W.,Weis Center for Research
Genes and Cancer | Year: 2014

Expression of carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9) is associated with poor prognosis and increased tumor aggressiveness and does not always correlate with HIF-1α expression. Presently, we analyzed the regulation of CA9 expression during hypoxia by HIF-1α, Notch3, and the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) in breast carcinoma cells. Both HIF-1α and Notch3 were absolutely required for the expression of CA9 mRNA, protein, and reporter. Reciprocal co-immunoprecipitation of HIF-1α, Notch3 intracellular domain (NICD3), and pVHL demonstrated their association. The presence of common consensus prolyl hydroxylation and pVHL binding motifs (L(XY)LAP);LLPLAP2191 suggested an oxygen-dependent regulation for NICD3. However, unlike the HIF-1α protein, NICD3 protein levels were not modulated with hypoxia or hypoxia-mimetic agents. Surprisingly, mutations of the common prolyl hydroxylation and pVHL binding domain lead to the loss of CA9 mRNA, protein, and reporter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated the association of NICD3, HIF-1α, and pVHL at the CA9 promoter. Further, the NICD3 mutant defective in prolyl hydroxylation and subsequent pVHL binding caused a reduction in cell proliferation of breast carcinoma cells. We show here for the first time that the interaction of HIF-1α with NICD3 is important for the regulation of CA9 expression. These findings suggest that although CA9 is a hypoxia-responsive gene, its expression is modulated by the interaction of HIF-1α, Notch3, and VHL proteins. Targeting the expression of CA9 by targeting upstream regulators could be useful in cancer/stem cell therapy. © The Author(s) 2013. Source


Sudol M.,Weis Center for Research
Genes and Cancer | Year: 2011

The Hippo tumor suppressor pathway regulates the size of organs by controlling 2 opposing processes: proliferation and apoptosis. The pathway was originally defined in Drosophila, but it is well conserved in mammals. One of the unique features of Hippo signaling is the unusually wide occurrence of WW domains and its cognate PPxY ligand motifs within components of this pathway. Recently, it was proposed that the prevalence of WW domain-mediated complexes in the Hippo signaling pathway should facilitate its molecular analysis and help in the identification of new components of the Hippo-centered network. Indeed, several new members of the Hippo pathway, which form functional complexes with WW domains of YAP and TAZ effectors, were recently described. We focus here on 2 families of such proteins, angiomotins and SMADs, plus 1 regulatory factor, WBP-2, which together shed new light on the rapidly expanding Hippo network. Since the Hippo pathway acts as a tumor suppressor pathway, the complexes described here, which assemble on WW domains of YAP and TAZ, represent potential targets of cancer therapy. © The Author(s) 2011. Source


Sudol M.,Weis Center for Research | Sudol M.,Mount Sinai School of Medicine | Harvey K.F.,Peter MacCallum Cancer Center | Harvey K.F.,University of Melbourne
Trends in Biochemical Sciences | Year: 2010

Metazoans have evolved several pathways to regulate the size of organs and ultimately that of organisms. One such pathway is known as Salvador-Warts-Hippo, or simply Hippo. Research on the Hippo pathway has grown exponentially during the past 8 years, revealing a complex signaling network. Intriguingly, within this complexity, there are levels of modularity. One level of modularity is represented by the unusually wide occurrence of the WW module in the Hippo core kinase cassette, the upstream regulatory components and the downstream nuclear proteins. We suggest that the prevalence of WW domain-mediated complexes in the Hippo pathway should facilitate its molecular analysis and aid prediction of new pathway components. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Benotti P.,Geisinger Obesity Research Institute | Wood G.C.,Geisinger Obesity Research Institute | Winegar D.A.,Surgical Review Corporation | Petrick A.T.,Geisinger Clinic | And 3 more authors.
Annals of Surgery | Year: 2014

OBJECTIVE: We sought to identify the major risk factors associated with mortality in Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery. BACKGROUND: Bariatric surgery has become an established treatment for extreme obesity. Bariatric surgery mortality has steadily declined with current rates of less than 0.5%. However, significant variation in the mortality rates has been reported for specific patient cohorts and among bariatric centers. METHODS: Clinical outcome data from 185,315 bariatric surgery patients from the Bariatric Outcome Longitudinal Database were reviewed. Of these, 157,559 patients had either documented 30 or more day follow-up data, including mortality. Multiple demographic, socioeconomic, and clinical factors were analyzed by univariate analysis for their association with 30-day mortality after gastric bypass. Variables found to be significant were entered into a multiple logistic regression model to identify factors independently associated with 30-day mortality. On the basis of these results, a RYGB mortality risk score was developed. RESULTS: The overall 30-day mortality rate for the entire bariatric surgery cohort was 0.1%. Of the 81,751 RYGB patients, the mortality rate was 0.15%. Factors significantly associated with 30-day gastric bypass mortality included increasing body mass index (BMI) (P < 0.0001), increasing age (P < 0.005), male gender (P < 0.001), pulmonary hypertension (P < 0.0001), congestive heart failure (P = 0.0008), and liver disease (P = 0.038). When the RYGB risk score was applied, a significant trend (P < 0.0001) between increasing risk score and mortality rate is found. CONCLUSIONS: Increasing BMI, increasing age, male gender, pulmonary hypertension, congestive heart failure, and liver disease are risk factors for 30-day mortality after RYGB. The RYGB risk score can be used to determine patients at greater risk for mortality after RYGB surgery. Copyright © 2013 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. Source

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