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News Article | November 18, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Upcoming annual meetings of the Weed Science Society of America (WSSA) and regional weed science organizations are expected to offer new perspectives on a wide range of issues vital to the future – from how to manage herbicide-resistant weeds to new advances in weed control technologies. The WSSA’s annual meeting is scheduled for February 6-9, 2017, in Tucson, Arizona. The wide-ranging agenda includes multiple symposia and workshops. Among the topics are: •Precision Agriculture and Weed Science •Understanding and Reducing the Impact of Herbicide Off-Site Movement •Contributions of USDA ARS Area-Wide Projects to Weed Science Research and Practice •Navigating the New Landscape of Federal Funding for Weed Science Research •Teaching Undergraduate Weed Science: Strategies to Improve Learning Additional details and registration information are available online at the Society’s website. •Canadian Weed Science Society Meeting (CWSS), November 21-24, 2016 CWSS will hold its 70th annual meeting in Moncton, New Brunswick. One unique aspect of the program is an opening plenary session on “Forensic Weed Science.” Experts will use photographs of crop fields to review actual issues growers have encountered and discuss how to identify the cause. A wide range of learning opportunities are on the agenda, including regulatory reports, discussions of weed management in various crops, a session on the biology and ecology of invasive and noxious weeds, and a CropLife Resistance Management Panel on how industry and academia can work together to better support resistance management on the farm. Additional details and registration information are available at http://www.weedscience.ca. •North Central Weed Science Society (NCWSS), December 12-15, 2016 NCWSS will convene in Des Moines, Iowa, for its annual meeting. Further details will be posted soon at http://www.ncwss.org. •Southern Weed Science Society (SWSS), January 23-25, 2017 The SWSS annual meeting is scheduled for Birmingham, Alabama. Registration information and meeting details will be posted soon at http://www.swss.ws. •Northeastern Weed Science Society (NEWSS), January 3-6, 2017 NEWSS will hold its annual meeting in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. It also will host the second annual Northeastern Plant, Pest and Soils Conference. Details will be posted soon at http://www.newss.org. •Western Society of Weed Science (WSWS), March 13-16, 2017 The WSWS annual meeting will be held in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho. Details will be posted soon at http://www.wsweedscience.org. About the Weed Science Society of America The Weed Science Society of America, a nonprofit scientific society, was founded in 1956 to encourage and promote the development of knowledge concerning weeds and their impact on the environment. The Society promotes research, education and extension outreach activities related to weeds, provides science-based information to the public and policy makers, fosters awareness of weeds and their impact on managed and natural ecosystems, and promotes cooperation among weed science organizations across the nation and around the world. For more information, visit http://www.wssa.net.


Monsefi A.,Indian Agricultural Research Institute | Sharma A.R.,Indian Agricultural Research Institute | Sharma A.R.,Weed Science Research | Das T.K.,Indian Agricultural Research Institute
Indian Journal of Agronomy | Year: 2013

A field experiment was conducted during 2010 and 2011 at New Delhi to study the performance of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill] grown after wheat [Triticum aestivum (L.) emend Fiori & Paol] under four tillage and crop establishment practices, viz. conventional tillage (CT)–flat-bed, CT–raised-bed, zero tillage (ZT)–flat-bed and ZT– raised-bed along with four weed management options, viz. unweeded control, pendimethalin @ 0.75 kg/ha as preemergence (PE) + hand weeding (HW), pendimethalin @ 0.75 kg/ha as PE + imazethapyr @ 75 g/ha as postemergence (POE), and wheat straw mulch @ 5 t/ha + imazethapyr @ 75 g/ha as POE. Total weed density and dry matter was comparatively higher under ZT than CT, but adoption of chemical + cultural weed control methods led to 79.5-82.5% weed control efficiency. Seed yield of soybean was equal under CT–raised-bed, CT–flat-bed and ZT–raised-bed, which was 11.7% more than ZT flat-bed. Similarly, pendimethalin + HW, pendimethalin + imazethapyr, and wheat straw mulch + imazethapyr resulted in almost similar weed control, and thus gave comparable seed yield, which was 39.1–42.7% higher than unweeded control. Weed and crop biomass followed opposite trends, and the seed yield decreased by 0.2 t/ha for an increase of 100 g/m2 in weed dry weight. Concentration of N, P and K in seed and stover of soybean was not influenced but the uptake was highest under CT–raisedbed, which was on par with ZT–raised-bed. Nutrient uptake was highest under pendimethalin + HW, which was significantly higher than under pendimethalin + imazethapyr, and wheat straw mulch + imazethapyr. The highest net benefit:cost was under ZT–raised-bed and pendimethalin + imazethapyr or pendimethalin + HW, followed by CT–raised-bed under the same weed control treatments. It was concluded that soybean can be grown under permanent raised-bed with pre- and post-emergence herbicides for realizing higher productivity and profitability. © 2013, Indian Society of Agronomy. All rights reserved.


Younesabadi M.,Indian Agricultural Research Institute | Das T.K.,Indian Agricultural Research Institute | Sharma A.R.,Indian Agricultural Research Institute | Sharma A.R.,Weed Science Research
Indian Journal of Agronomy | Year: 2013

A field experiment was carried out at the Indian Agricultural Research Institute during 2010 and 2011 to investigate the effect of tillage and tank-mix herbicide application on growth, yield, nutrient uptake and protein content of soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merrill]. It was observed that conventional (CT) and no (NT) tillage systems resulted in comparable weed density and dry weight and soybean seed yield during both years except 2010, when NT resulted in significantly lower weed density. Tank-mix pre-emergence application of pendimethalin 0.5 kg/ha + imazethapyr 0.075 kg/ha was next to weed-free check and superior to all other weed control treatments on the reduction of weed density in both years, but, with respect to reduction in weed dry weight, it was comparable with pendimethalin 0.5 kg/ha + hand weeding, which resulted in the lowest weed dry weight after weed-free check. Nitrogen, P and K uptake by soybean seed was comparably higher in weed-free check and tank-mix pre-emergence application of pendimethalin 0.5 kg/ha + imazethapyr 0.075 kg/ha in both years. Conversely, N, P and K uptake by weed was significantly higher in weedy check, and the lowest amount of these nutrients after weed-free check was observed in pendimethalin 0.5 kg/ha + imazethapyr 0.075 kg/ha. All weed control measures resulted in significantly higher soybean seed yield compared to weedy check, but the tank-mix pre-emergence application of pendimethalin 0.5 kg/ha + imazethapyr 0.075 kg/ha resulted in considerably higher seed yield over others in both years.


Mishra J.S.,Weed Science Research | Mishra J.S.,Sorghum Research | Singh V.P.,Weed Science Research | Bhanu C.,Weed Science Research | And 3 more authors.
Indian Journal of Agricultural Sciences | Year: 2012

A field study was conducted to study the effect of methods of rice establishment, tillage and weed management techniques in rice-chickpea cropping system. Treatments included four crop establishment techniques (transplanting, puddling and broadcasting sprouted rice seeds, i.e wet-seeding and dry seeding under conventional and zero tillage systems) in rice and two tillage (zero and conventional) and two weed control methods (weedy check and pendimethalin 1.0 kg/ha as pre-emergence + one hand weeding at 30 days after sowing) in succeeding chickpea. Rice field was infested with jungle rice [Echinochloa colona (L.) Link], Caesulia (Caesulia axillaris Roxb.), sessile joyweed [Alternanthera sessilis (L.) DC.], and rice flat sedge (Cyperus iria L.) and chickpea with wild oats (Avena ludoviciana Dur.) and toothed burclover (Medicago hispida Gaertn.). Results revealed that methods of rice establishment did influence the weed dynamics in rice- chickpea system. Mean yield of zero-till direct-seeded rice (3 262 kg/ha) was as good as that of puddle broadcast rice (3 343 kg/ha) and better than the transplanted rice (3 038 kg/ha). Effective weed control in preceding chickpea benefitted the succeeding rice crop. Methods of rice establishment and tillage did not influence the chickpea yield. Infestation of weeds caused 78.45% reduction in yield of chickpea. Maximum seed yield of chickpea (2 813 kg/ha) was noticed in pendimethalin followed by one HW under conventional tillage. Zero till direct-seeded rice followed by zero-till chickpea system was the best combination for maximizing system productivity, profitability and energy efficiency.


Dixit A.,Weed Science Research | Sondhia S.,Weed Science Research | Varshney J.G.,Weed Science Research
Indian Journal of Agricultural Sciences | Year: 2011

A study was conducted 2004-06 at Jabalpur on bioefficacy of pinoxaden applied to wheat (Triticum aestivun L.) crop at 35, 40, 80 and 160 g/ha. Application of Pinoxaden at 40 g/ha mixed with surfactant, (A12127 R) significantly controlled grassy weeds, specially little seed canary grass (Phalaris minor L. Retz.) and normal wild oats (Avena ludoviciana Dur.) in wheat as evident from the lowest no. of weeds/m 2 and weed biomass. No phytotoxic symptoms were observed in wheat crop treated up to 160 g/ha. When paddy was grown on the same piece of land, there was no adverse effect on the crop stand. Rice crop well tolerated the application of pinoxaden in the preceding wheat crop and observations on weed control and yield were comparable with untreated, suggesting no residual effect of pinoxaden on the succeeding crop.


Sondhia S.,Weed Science Research
Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology | Year: 2012

Disappearance of pendimethalin in the soil of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) at 0-110 days, and terminal residues in plant samples have been studied under field conditions. Pendimethalin was applied as pre-emergence herbicide at 750, 350 and 180 g a.i. ha-1 in winter, in chickpea crop. The dissipation of pendimethalin in the chickpea field soil conditions followed first order kinetics showing a half-life of 11.23 days averaged over all doses. Low pendimethalin residues were found in plant samples. 0.025, 0.015, <0.001 μg g-1 residues of pendimethalin were found in grains at 750, 350 and 185 g a.i. ha-1 treatments, respectively. Much lower pendimethalin residues were found in straw viz. 0.015 to <0.001 μg g -1 at 750, 350 and 185 g a.i. ha-1 treatments, respectively. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012.


Mishra J.S.,Sorghum Research | Singh V.P.,Weed Science Research
Soil and Tillage Research | Year: 2012

A 3-year (2006-2007 to 2008-2009) field study was conducted to evaluate the effect of four tillage systems {zero tillage (ZT) in rice (Oryza sativa L.) and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), conventional tillage (CT) in rice and wheat, and two rotational tillage sequences that alternated between CT and ZT} with three weed management levels (weedy check, recommended herbicide and herbicide+1 hand weeding) in rice-wheat cropping system on a clay-loam soil. Continuous ZT increased the population density of awnless barnyard grass [Echinochloa colona (L.) Link] and rice flat sedge (Cyperus iria L.) in rice but reduced the population of wild oats [Avena ludoviciana (L.) Dur.] and common lambsquarters (Chenopodium album L.) in subsequent wheat. Pendimethalin (1.0kga.i.ha -1) fb 2,4-D (0.50kga.i.ha -1) significantly reduced the population density of E. colona, C. iria and sessile joyweed [Alternanthera sessilis (L.) D.C.], but did not control pink node flower (Caesulia axillaris Roxb.) in rice. In wheat, clodinafop propargyl (0.06kga.i.ha -1) fb 2,4-D (0.50kga.i.ha -1) significantly reduced the population of A. ludoviciana, but had no effect on toothed burclover (Medicago hispida Gaertn.). Continuous ZT resulted in significantly higher yield of rice (2.94Mgha -1), wheat (4.45Mgha -1) and rice-wheat system (7.39Mgha -1) compared to continuous CT (2.35, 3.86 and 6.21Mgha -1, respectively). For the total soil depth sampled (0-20cm), weed seed population was significantly greater under continuous ZT (165 weeds 500g -1 soil) and CT (101 weeds 500g -1 soil), compared to rotational tillage (71-85 weeds 500g -1 soil). Rotational tillage systems significantly reduced the seed density of C. iria, A. ludoviciana and M. hispida compared to continuous ZT or CT. Total weed seed density was 66% lower in herbicide treated than in untreated plots. Continuous ZT with effective weed management using recommended herbicide+1 hand weeding was more remunerative and energy efficient. These results suggest that conventional till-based rice-wheat system could be replaced with zero-till-based crop establishment method with effective weed control to save labor and energy in Vertisols of Central India. © 2012 Elsevier B.V..

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