Glen Cove, NY, United States
Glen Cove, NY, United States

Webb Institute is a private undergraduate engineering college in Glen Cove, New York on Long Island. Each graduate of Webb Institute earns a Bachelor of Science degree in naval architecture and marine engineering. Successful candidates for admission receive full tuition for four years. Webb Institute is noted in the marine industry for its unique emphasis on ship design, systems engineering, and practical work experience. Wikipedia.

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News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

MCLEAN, VA--(Marketwired - February 14, 2017) - The MITRE Corporation, a private systems engineering and technology company, today announced that its Board of Trustees has appointed Dr. Jason Providakes as President and Chief Executive Officer, effective March 6, 2017. Dr. Providakes previously held the position of Senior Vice President and General Manager of MITRE's Center for Connected Government. Dr. Providakes will succeed Mr. Alfred Grasso, who previously announced his intention to step down. Mr. Grasso will continue as a member of the Board of Trustees. "This is a superb company, dedicated to supporting the government with objective, technical expertise," said Dr. John Hamre, Chairman of MITRE's Board of Trustees and President and CEO of the Center for Strategic & International Studies. "We are entering a dynamic and challenging new phase for government, and we believe Jason will set the right tone, energy, and structure for MITRE's future." Since joining MITRE in 1991, Providakes has spearheaded major programs to modernize federal infrastructure and create mission capabilities for national security, population health, our Veterans, and civil agencies. He has served as the Director of the Homeland Security Systems Engineering and Development Institute, and of the Joint and Defense-Wide Systems Division within the National Security Engineering Center. An expert in optical and remote sensing technologies with extensive systems engineering experience, he has served as a member of the Army Science Board and contributed to several National Academy studies. "I am honored to lead MITRE in the next phase of its proud history of service to America," said Providakes, "and I am committed to advancing our international reputation for technical excellence and innovation. Public-sector challenges are dynamic and complex, and our cross-domain approach and enterprise-wide systems thinking to collaboration between government, industry, and academia have never been more critical than they are today." "I know that Jason is the right CEO for MITRE at this moment in our history," said Al Grasso, who announced on December 19, 2016 that he would step down once a successor was named. "He was selected with unanimous support of the board, informed by our highest ambitions. With Jason's leadership, we will continue to impact complex challenges of national and global significance." With the addition of Providakes, MITRE's Board of Trustees consists of Dr. John Hamre; Dr. George Campbell Jr., Chairman of the Board of Trustees at the Webb Institute of Naval Architecture; Mr. Nicholas Donofrio, former IBM executive vice president for innovation and technology; Mr. Robert Everett, former MITRE president; Ms. Michèle Flournoy, co-founder and chief executive officer of the Center for a New American Security; Mr. David Fubini , director emeritus at McKinsey & Company; Admiral Edmund P. Giambastiani, Jr., retired from the U.S. Navy; Mr. Alfred Grasso, former MITRE president and CEO; George Halvorson, former chairman and chief executive officer of Kaiser Permanente; General C. Robert Kehler, U.S. Air Force (Ret.), former commander, U.S. Strategic Command; Mr. Cleve Killingsworth, former chairman and chief executive officer of Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts; General Robert T. Marsh, USAF (Ret.), Air Force Systems Command; Ms. Cathy Minehan, managing director of Arlington Advisory Partners, LLC; General Montgomery C. Meigs, U.S. Army (Ret.), former president and chief executive officer of Business Executives for National Security; Dean Elizabeth Rindskopf Parker, Dean Emerita of the McGeorge School of Law at the University of the Pacific; Mike Rogers, former Congressman and founder, the Mike Rogers Center for Intelligence and Global Affairs; Mary Schapiro, formerly chairperson of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission; Rodney Slater, former U.S. Secretary of Transportation; Mr. John Stenbit, former Assistant Secretary of Defense for Command, Control, Communications, and Intelligence. The MITRE Corporation is a not-for-profit organization that operates research and development centers sponsored by the federal government.


News Article | October 23, 2015
Site: news.mit.edu

James A. (Jay) Fay, a professor emeritus in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, past away on Tuesday, June 2, of complications from lymphoma. He was 91. The list of people who will miss him is large: His devoted family of six children and their spouses, 18 grandchildren, and four great-grandchildren, are the first to feel the loss. But close behind are the many professionals at MIT and a host of other institutions and causes that benefitted from his extraordinary personal talents. Fay grew up in Brooklyn, New York, but spent his summers in Southold, New York, close to the waters of the Long Island Sound. This motivated his lifelong interest in sailing and led him to earn a BS at the Webb Institute of Naval Architecture in 1944, while an ensign with the U.S. Naval Reserve. Subsequently, he obtained an MS from MIT in marine engineering and a PhD from Cornell University in the unsteady propagation of gaseous detonation waves. After serving on the Cornell faculty from 1951 to 1955, he was recruited to join MIT as an associate professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering (MechE), where he remained until transitioning to emeritus professor status in 1989. The hallmark of Fay’s success as an innovator and contributor was listening carefully and crystallizing the essence of a discussion. Having reached that point, he was committed to seeing a process through to the appropriate conclusion. This was true across the board, whether it was a decision to perform a “ready – about” in a sailing race or writing a definitive opinion on the ecological folly of extending the John F. Kennedy Airport runways into Jamaica Bay. His selection of research topics at MIT was geared to the common good: air and water pollution problems, acid rain, the safety hazards of liquefied gases, renewable energy, and the spread of oil and other hazardous liquids on the ocean. However, it was his early career work on combustion and detonation, hypersonic heat transfer, magnetohydrodynamics, and plasmadynamics that were the hallmarks of his election into the National Academy of Engineering in 1998. He continued to create new textbooks after his decision to become emeritus. Fay’s great ability to synthesize solutions in difficult circumstances was amply demonstrated in his service to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts as chairman from 1972 to 1977 of the Massachusetts Port Authority (Massport), the organization that controls Logan Airport, the Boston seaport, and several other Boston-area transportation facilities. Under Fay’s leadership, Massport transitioned into a sleeker, more environmentally-aware public-serving entity. In the words of Alan Altschuler, former secretary of transportation for the Commonwealth, “Jay’s combination of wisdom, deep knowledge, total integrity, and courage in the face of (unfair public) attacks through even the most stressful controversies was absolutely remarkable.” Fay played key roles in no fewer than 20 environmental organizations and panels that sought to develop public policy in a new world threatened with pollution and environmental hazards. This included 46 years of service as a director of the Union of Concerned Scientists seeking to ameliorate the threat of nuclear catastrophe. His reasoned and thoughtful scientific approach to these problems was critically important in building credibility for public examination of our approach to environmental threats. The family has arranged a funeral mass at St. Julia Church at 374 Boston Post Road in Weston, Massachusetts, on Saturday, June 13, at 10 a.m. This will be followed by a celebration of his life at the Biagio Ristorante at 123 Moody Street in Waltham.


GLEN COVE, N.Y.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Paul Vragel, Founder and President of 4aBetterBusiness and a 1972 graduate of Webb Institute, will speak to the entire student body of Webb Institute on March 6, 2017 on the topic “Using Systems Engineering to Achieve Transformational Business Results.” Based on transformational results achieved by 4aBetterBusiness in manufacturing, distribution and B2B services companies, the presentation will cover the core insights that enable transformational results, an example of systems engineering applied to a design and manufacturing company, implementation issues to ensure management and employee buy-in, tools that can be used immediately, and resources for further reference and investigation by the students. Founded in 1889 by William H. Webb, Webb Institute is a top-ranked undergraduate college specializing in Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering. Webb provides full-tuition scholarships to all admitted students; admission to Webb is extremely competitive with a maximum of 28 students being accepted into the program each year. Webb Institute prides itself on a 100% placement rate for graduates who are highly sought after by all segments of the marine industry. Webb Institute is located on a beautiful, waterfront campus in Glen Cove, NY, on the North Shore of Long Island. For more information, visit www.webb.edu. 4aBetterBusiness is a leading implementation-based consultancy, founded in 1989, that works side-by-side with management and employees and achieves transformational results through operations, in areas including valuation, growth, profitability, customer satisfaction and employee engagement. Results include increased valuation 75% within 18 months in company sale to a Fortune 500 buyer, implemented scalable processes that supported and enabled doubling sales and tripling profits in 18 months, including first business with Toyota within 12 months, increased earnings 30% within 6 months, without layoffs or capital expenditure, increased customer satisfaction 15% within 9 months and achieved a record number of Perfect Attendance Awards. For more information, visit www.4abetterbusiness.com.


Zangle T.,Navatek Ltd | Hadler J.B.,Webb Institute
FAST 2013 - 12th International Conference on Fast Sea Transportation | Year: 2013

This paper is a continuation of the series of papers that have been presented since 2005 at previous FAST conferences on the development of the hi-speed catamaran hull form employing semi-elliptical sections, the effect of transom area on smooth water resistance and most recently the comparison of the interference resistance with the University of Southampton Catamaran Series published in the Transactions of RINA. In this paper the performance of this hull configuration is now being examined in a seaway and compared with the seakeeping performance of the DELFT-372 presented at FAST'11. The catamaran motions, namely pitch, heave and added resistance, in a seaway have been determined through regular wave tests in the Robinson Model Basin at Webb Institute at five different Froude Numbers ranging from Fn = 0.6 to 0.8. Complimentary to the experimental results, ship motion calculations have been made at the corresponding speeds using the potential flow program Aegir for direct comparison to the experimental results. These same calculations have been made for the DELFT-372 catamaran hull form for comparison with the experimental results presented at FAST'11. Finally the results of the experiments and the calculations on both hull forms will be compared to establish their comparative performance in a seaway.


Golubeva E.V.,Webb Institute | Eliseevnin V.A.,Russian Academy of Sciences
Acoustical Physics | Year: 2010

The problem of emission of a single normal wave by a vertical discrete linear array in the Pekeris waveguide is studied. The array aperture is less than the waveguide thickness. The sound energy is emitted into the discrete and continuous spectra. © 2010 Pleiades Publishing, Ltd.


Wiggins E.G.,Webb Institute
Journal of Marine Science and Application | Year: 2011

Propulsion of liquefied natural gas (LNG) ships is undergoing significant change. The traditional steam plant is losing favor because of its low cycle efficiency. Medium-speed diesel-electric and slow-speed diesel-mechanical drive ships are in service, and more are being built. Another attractive alternative is combined gas and steam turbine (COGAS) drive. This approach offers significant advantages over steam and diesel propulsion. This paper presents the case for the COGAS cycle. © 2011 Harbin Engineering University and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Katz J.,Webb Institute
Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology | Year: 2010

Despite advances in the treatment of cancer, the prognosis of patient diagnosed with metastatis cancer to the brain remains poor. The role of neural stem cells as a viable tool in the treatment of metastatic cancer to the brain alone or in conjuction with current therapeutic modalities is promising. Both murine and human neural stem cells (NSCs) have been shown to migrate through the central nervous system (CNS) and infiltrate tumors and other pathological disease states of the brain. Genetic modification of NSCs to produce cytotoxic or immunomodulatory agents in the vicinity of a primary tumor and/or satellite lesion or has proven instrumental to the reduction of tumor bulk in murine models. Although the use of stem cells proves to be a volatile social topic, scientists have discovered that NSCs are present in the adult brain and continue to propagate and differentiate. These cells may be isolated and cultured to produce clonal NSC lines that are capable of self renewal and differentiation when introduced into the CNS. In this chapter, we describe protocols currently used in our lab for the successful maintenance of NSCs in vitro advancing the role of neural stem cells in the treatment of brain tumors. © 2010 Landes Bioscience and Springer Science+Business Media.


Wiggins E.G.,Webb Institute
Marine Technology | Year: 2015

NS Savannah was the first steam-powered ship to make an ocean voyage. It is a single-screw passenger cargo vessel with an overall length of 595 ft., a beam of 78 ft. and a design draft of 29 ft 6 inches. The machinery plant had a normal output of 20,000 shaft horsepower at 107 propeller revolutions per minute, which propelled the ship at 21 knots Her crew comprised 109 people, and she had cabin space for 60 passengers. Fission rate in the core was controlled by 21 cross-shaped control rods. These rods are made of boron stainless steel. Because the nuclear reactor is aborad the ship, the control rod mechanisms were designed to function normally at inclinations up to 30 degrees and to be held in place even in the event the ship capsized.


Wiggins E.G.,Webb Institute
Computers in Education Journal | Year: 2010

A comparison of the solution to transient heat conduction in a sphere to three approximate methods, namely, the lumped capacity method, the Heisler chart method, and the heat balance integral method was analyzed. Mathcad software was used with each of these methods. One-dimensional, unsteady heat conduction in a sphere is governed by partial differential equation. All the methods were applied to a sphere of radius 2.75 cm. The sphere is initially at a uniform temperature of 8°C. The Lumped Capacity approximation should not be considered valid at the either time as the Biot number is too large by about a factor of three. The value of π is 0.15 at three minutes and 1.0 at 20 minutes, so the Heisler Chart and Heat Balance Integral approximations should be valid at 20 minutes but invalid at 3 minutes. The Heisler Chart and Heat Balance Integral approximations agree quite well with the two and three-term approximations to the exact solution.


Terskikh A.,Webb Institute
Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology | Year: 2010

Recent advances in stem cell and developmental neurobiology have uncovered new perspectives from which we investigate various forms of cancer. Specifically, the hypothesis that tumors are comprised of a subpopulation of malignant cells similar to stem cells is of great interest to scientists and clinicians and has been dubbed the cancer stem cell hypothesis. The region where this is most relevant is within the brain. Cancer stem cells have been isolated from brain tumors that exhibit characteristics of differentiation and proliferation normally seen only in neural stem cells. These cancer stem cells may be responsible for tumor origin, survival and proliferation. Furthermore, these cells must be considered within their immediate microenvironment when investigating mechanisms of tumorgenesis. Evidence of brain tumor stem cells will be reviewed along with the role of tumor environment as the context within which these cells should be understood. © 2010 Landes Bioscience and Springer Science+Business Media.

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