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Burlakoti R.R.,Tribhuvan University | Burlakoti R.R.,Weather Innovations Consulting LP | Shrestha S.M.,Tribhuvan University | Sharma R.C.,Tribhuvan University | Sharma R.C.,International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas
Journal of Plant Pathology | Year: 2013

Bipolaris sorokiniana is a principal agent of seedling blight, spot blotch, root rot and black point of spring wheat in Nepal. The impact of seed-borne inoculum levels (SIL), irrigation, and cropping pattern on the multiplication of B. sorokiniana propagules and progress of foliar blight and common root on wheat is not well understood. To get insight on it, two wheat genotypes (cvs Sonalika and BL 1473) each with four SILs (5, 35, 65 and 95%) were field-evaluated in a strip-split-plot design under irrigated and non-irrigated conditions during 2002-03 at Rampur, (Chitwan, Nepal). The experiments were duplicated under fallow-wheat and rice-wheat system. The study revealed that the propagation of B. sorokiniana and the severity of foliar blight and root rot was positively influenced by SIL and susceptibility of wheat cultivars, while irrigation and cropping pattern had a lower impact. There was a significant positive association (r = 0.83, P <0.01) between SIL with B. sorokiniana frequency on leaf and stem up to flowering stages indicating that seed-borne inoculum levels had high influence in the early establishment of foliar blight. There was a high positive correlation of SIL with pathogen frequency on root at all four growth stages (r values 0.93 to 0.99, P < 0.01) and root rot index (r = 0.75, P < 0.05) suggesting that SIL had a strong impact on common root rot. The outcome of this study will be useful to develop strategies of integrated management of foliar blight and root rot on wheat.


Burlakoti R.R.,Weather Innovations Consulting LP | Zandstra J.,University of Guelph | Jackson K.,Weather Innovations Consulting LP
Canadian Journal of Plant Pathology | Year: 2014

Anthracnose fruit rot caused by Colletotrichum acutatum is an economically important disease of strawberry in Ontario. Three years of experiments (2009-2011) were conducted at the University of Guelphs Cedar Springs Research Station in Blenheim, ON to understand anthracnose fruit rot epidemics in outdoor field and protected production systems and to evaluate different fungicide spray programmes for disease control in day-neutral strawberry. Weather-based fungicide timing programmes were compared with calendar spray programmes in two day-neutral cultivars, Seascape and Albion. Incidence of disease in high-tunnels was very low in all 3 years, even in fungicide non-sprayed plots, indicating that cultivation of day-neutral strawberry in high-tunnels could be an alternative strategy for controlling anthracnose fruit rot with minimal use of fungicides. In outdoor fields, disease incidence was greatly influenced by leaf wetness duration, rainfall and temperature. The use of a weather-based model to determine the timing of fungicide treatments reduced the number of sprays and was as effective as a calendar-based spray at 7-day intervals to reduce the disease and increase marketable fruit yield. Rotating fungicides with different modes of actions (pyraclostrobin, myclobutanil and boscalid + pyraclostrobin) was more effective in reducing disease than regular sprays of captan. The outcomes of this research will be useful to develop decision support tools and select proper fungicides and cultivation systems to manage anthracnose. © 2014 The Canadian Phytopathological Society.


Burlakoti R.R.,Tribhuvan University | Burlakoti R.R.,Weather INnovations Consulting LP | Shrestha S.M.,Tribhuvan University | Sharma R.C.,Tribhuvan University | Sharma R.C.,International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas
Archives of Phytopathology and Plant Protection | Year: 2014

The study was conducted to assess the impact of natural seed-borne inoculum levels of Bipolaris sorokiniana on seedling emergence and growth, seedling blight and the early establishment of foliar blight in field. Three levels of seed-borne inoculum (11, 19 and 29%) of one cultivar (Sonalika) and four levels of seed-borne inoculum (5, 35, 65 and 95%) of two wheat cultivars (Sonalika and BL 1473) were evaluated in 2002 and 2003 field experiments, respectively. Seedling vigour study was conducted in the greenhouse in 2003. Seed-borne inoculum levels higher than 35% reduced seedling emergence and seedling vigour substantially, and also increased the seedling blight indicating that the seed-borne inoculum of B. sorokiniana played a crucial role in seedling health and early establishment of the pathogen on wheat. The findings will help to reduce the inoculum pressure of spot blotch and common root rot on wheat. © 2013 © 2013 Taylor & Francis.

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