Milwaukee, WI, United States
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Caswell H.C.,Pacific Power | Forte V.J.,National Grid | Fraser J.C.,Nova Scotia Power Inc. | Pahwa A.,Kansas State University | And 3 more authors.
IEEE Transactions on Power Delivery | Year: 2011

Weather significantly influences distribution reliability indices, especially duration benchmarks like SAIDI. We explore correlations with various weather parameters including lightning-detection network data, and wind from weather stations. This paper explores a number of ways to account for the variability caused by weather. Approaches include regression models to normalize with weather data as inputs, using outage database indicators of weather, and modifications to the 2.5 beta method of IEEE Std. 1366. © 2010 IEEE.


Cassidy D.P.,Western Michigan University | Srivastava V.J.,CH2M HILL | Dombrowski F.J.,WE Energies | Lingle J.W.,EPRI
Journal of Hazardous Materials | Year: 2015

Laboratory batch reactors were maintained for 32 weeks to test the potential for an in situ remedy that combines chemical oxidation, stabilization, and anaerobic bioremediation in a single application to treat soil from a manufactured gas plant, contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX). Portland cement and slaked lime were used to activate the persulfate and to stabilize/encapsulate the contaminants that were not chemically oxidized. Native sulfate-reducing bacteria degraded residual contaminants using the sulfate left after persulfate activation. The ability of the combined remedy to reduce contaminant mass and leachability was compared with NaOH-activated persulfate, stabilization, and sulfate-reducing bioremediation as stand-alone technologies. The stabilization amendments increased pH and temperature sufficiently to activate the persulfate within 1 week. Activation with both stabilization amendments and NaOH removed between 55% and 70% of PAH and BTEX. However, combined persulfate and stabilization significantly reduced the leachability of residual BTEX and PAH compared with NaOH activation. Sulfide, 2-naphthoic acid, and the abundance of subunit A of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase gene (dsrA) were used to monitor native sulfate-reducing bacteria, which were negatively impacted by activated persulfate, but recovered completely within weeks. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.


PubMed | EPRI, CH2M HILL, WE Energies and Western Michigan University
Type: | Journal: Journal of hazardous materials | Year: 2015

Laboratory batch reactors were maintained for 32 weeks to test the potential for an in situ remedy that combines chemical oxidation, stabilization, and anaerobic bioremediation in a single application to treat soil from a manufactured gas plant, contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX). Portland cement and slaked lime were used to activate the persulfate and to stabilize/encapsulate the contaminants that were not chemically oxidized. Native sulfate-reducing bacteria degraded residual contaminants using the sulfate left after persulfate activation. The ability of the combined remedy to reduce contaminant mass and leachability was compared with NaOH-activated persulfate, stabilization, and sulfate-reducing bioremediation as stand-alone technologies. The stabilization amendments increased pH and temperature sufficiently to activate the persulfate within 1 week. Activation with both stabilization amendments and NaOH removed between 55% and 70% of PAH and BTEX. However, combined persulfate and stabilization significantly reduced the leachability of residual BTEX and PAH compared with NaOH activation. Sulfide, 2-naphthoic acid, and the abundance of subunit A of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase gene (dsrA) were used to monitor native sulfate-reducing bacteria, which were negatively impacted by activated persulfate, but recovered completely within weeks.


Olson T.,WE Energies | Wade D.,Alstom | Gelbar D.,Alstom
American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Power Division (Publication) POWER | Year: 2014

We Energies Oak Creek Power Plant units 5 and 6 were designed and built with no main steam temperature control mechanism. We Energies wanted to add desuperheaters to the units and do so in the simplest and most cost effective manner. Previous proposed solutions were deemed too expensive or potentially unreliable. The selected option from Alstom Power utilized the unique design elements of the boilers and offered up the temperature control required. The new desuperheater system has positively affected plant startup and normal operation of these boilers. Copyright © 2014 by ASME and Alstom Technologie AG.


Naik T.R.,University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee | Kumar R.,University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee | Ramme B.W.,WE Energies | Canpolat F.,Yildiz Technical University
Construction and Building Materials | Year: 2012

This paper presents information regarding development, properties, and advantages and disadvantages of using high-strength self-consolidating concrete in the construction industry. It also presents results of a study recently completed for manufacturing economical high-strength self-consolidating concrete containing high-volumes of fly ash. In this study, portland cement was replaced by Class C fly ash in the range of 35-55% by the mass of cement. The results of fresh and hardened properties of concrete show that the use of high-volumes of Class C fly ash in self-consolidating concrete reduces the requirements for superplasticizer (HRWRA) and viscosity modifying agent (VMA) compared with the normal dosage for such admixtures in self-consolidating concrete. The results further indicate that economical self-consolidating concrete with 28-day strengths up to 62 MPa can be made using high-volumes of fly ash. Such concretes can be used for a wide range of applications from cast-in-place to precast concrete construction. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Ramme A.C.,American Transmission Company | Ramme B.W.,WE Energies
2nd International Conference on Sustainable Construction Materials and Technologies | Year: 2010

This paper presents results of technology transfer efforts for design and construction practice with research performed to identify and recommend mixture proportions for high-volume fly ash content 4,500 psi (31 MPa) structural grade concrete utilizing ASTM-C618, Class C fly ash. The transmission structure foundations were constructed in Wisconsin with cold weather considerations. Many transmission structure foundations are of sufficient size where mass concrete considerations (with respect to minimizing thermal cracking from excess heat of hydration) are important considerations. This paper describes the development of high-volume fly ash concrete for construction with an emphasis on environmental sustainability in providing long life structures, reducing CO 2 emissions, making use of a co-product of electric power generation, conservation of natural resources, and energy conservation. This paper also shows a significant cost savings through the increased use of fly ash.


News Article | November 22, 2016
Site: www.prnewswire.com

MILWAUKEE, Nov. 22, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- For the sixth year in a row, We Energies has received the ReliabilityOne™ Award in the Midwest for the superior reliability of its electric system. This also marks the ninth time in the past 11 years that the company has been recognized as the most...


DeNardo C.,WE Energies
Papers Presented at the Annual Conference - Rural Electric Power Conference | Year: 2012

In March of 2006 an IEEE Power and Energy Society Working Group, sponsored by the Transmission & Distribution Committee and attached to its Distribution Subcommittee, received approval to begin work on a "Trial Use Guide for Assessing Voltages at Publicly and Privately Accessible Locations". When complete the "Guide" will address the normal and abnormal voltages that exist at accessible locations as a result of the delivery and use of electrical energy (i.e. stray and contact voltage). It is intended to help dispel misinformation and enhance public safety. This paper will discuss Working Group activities to date including the approach taken, working definitions being used, and difficult questions being raised. © 2012 IEEE.


Werner V.G.,WE Energies
2010 IEEE PES Transmission and Distribution Conference and Exposition: Smart Solutions for a Changing World | Year: 2010

The data collection, storage, access and use of electric service interruptions to address individual customer reliability at We Energies is examined. This paper provides a thorough description of the data collection methods and the inhouse tools that were developed at We Energies to access the collected data and make use of the customer level information. The use, planned use, and setting of goals for customer information are also discussed. © 2010 IEEE.


Werner V.G.,WE Energies
Proceedings of the IEEE Power Engineering Society Transmission and Distribution Conference | Year: 2012

The guidelines for categorizations of electric power interruption events experienced on electric distribution systems will be set forth in the Trial-Use Guide for Collecting, Categorizing and Utilization of Information Related to Electric Power Distribution Interruption Events (P1782). This paper will describe how We Energies power interruption event data, while it is not warehoused under the same categories as prescribed in P1782, can still be presented for benchmarking comparisons in P1782 format. This paper will compare We Energies data with that in the following subsections of P1782, Section 1, Data Consistency and Categorization for Benchmarking Surveys: Interruption Cause Categories, Responsible System, Voltage Level, Interrupting Devices, and Customer Restoration. © 2012 IEEE.

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