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Ichikawa, Japan

Wayō Women's University is a private women's college in Ichikawa, Chiba, Japan. The predecessor of the school was founded in 1897, and it was chartered as a university in 1949 Wikipedia.


Murakami K.,University of Tokyo | Sasaki S.,University of Tokyo | Takahashi Y.,Wayo Womens University | Uenishi K.,Kagawa Nutrition University
Nutrition Research | Year: 2010

The affordability of food is considered as an important factor influencing people's diet and hence health status. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to test the hypothesis that neighborhood food store availability is associated with some aspects of dietary intake and thus possibly with body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference in young Japanese women. Subjects were 989 female Japanese dietetic students 18 to 22 years of age. Neighborhood food store availability was defined as the number of food stores within a 0.5-mile (0.8-km) radius of residence (meat stores, fish stores, fruit and vegetable stores, confectionery stores/bakeries, rice stores, convenience stores, and supermarkets/grocery stores). Dietary intake was estimated using a validated, comprehensive self-administered diet history questionnaire. No association was seen between any measure of neighborhood food store availability and dietary intake, except for a positive association between confectionery and bread availability (based on confectionery stores/bakeries, convenience stores, and supermarkets/grocery stores) and intake of these items (P for trend = .02). Further, no association was seen for BMI or waist circumference, except for an inverse relationship between availability of convenience stores and BMI and a positive relationship between store availability for meat (meat stores and supermarkets/grocery stores) and fish (fish stores and supermarkets/grocery stores) and waist circumference. In conclusion, this study of young Japanese women found no meaningful association between neighborhood food store availability and dietary intake, BMI, or waist circumference, with the exception of a positive relationship between availability and intake for confectionery and bread. © 2010 Elsevier Inc. Source


Sato T.,Chiba University | Kita K.,Chiba University | Sugaya S.,Chiba University | Suzuki T.,Wayo Womens University | Suzuki N.,Chiba University
Pancreas | Year: 2012

OBJECTIVES: Extracellular microenvironment plays crucial roles in the development of cancers and chemoresistance. Pancreatic carcinoma is resistant to almost all chemotherapeutic agents. In this study, we identified annexin II in the medium from pancreatic cancer cells as a protein released into the extracellular environment. METHODS: Medium from 5-hour cultures of various cancer cells was collected. Proteins in the medium were detected by molecular mass analysis and immunoblotting. Anticancer drug sensitivity of cells preincubated with or without recombinant annexin II (rANX II) was measured using crystal violet assay and colony survival assay. Apoptosis-related molecules were analyzed by immunoblotting. RESULTS: Recombinant ANX II supplementation in the medium confers resistance to anticancer drugs, including cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, and gemcitabine, in MiaPaCa-2 and AsPC-1 cells. In MiaPaCa-2 cells, rANX II supplementation resulted in suppression of caspase-3 activation associated with increased Bcl-2/Bax ratios. Suppression of cisplatin-induced cell death by rANX II supplementation was canceled by inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase signal pathways. CONCLUSIONS: The current study is the first report to demonstrate that supplementation of rANX II in the medium increased resistance to anticancer drugs in pancreatic cancer cells. Recombinant ANX II exerts cell death-suppressive function by antagonizing cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Copyright © 2012 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. Source


Murakami K.,University of Tokyo | Sasaki S.,University of Tokyo | Takahashi Y.,Wayo Womens University | Uenishi K.,Kagawa Nutrition University
British Journal of Nutrition | Year: 2010

Previous studies on the relationship of local food environment with residents' diets have relied exclusively on self-reported information on diet, producing inconsistent results. Evaluation of dietary intake using biomarkers may obviate the biases inherent to the use of self-reported dietary information. This cross-sectional study examined the association between neighbourhood food store availability and 24h urinary Na and K excretion. The subjects were 904 female Japanese dietetic students aged 18-22 years. Neighbourhood food store availability was defined as the number of food stores within a 05-mile (08-km) radius of residence. Urinary Na and K excretion and the ratio of urinary Na to K were estimated from a single 24h urine sample. After adjustment for potential confounding factors, neighbourhood availability of confectionery stores/bakeries was inversely associated with urinary K, and was positively associated with the ratio of Na to K (P for trend=0008 and 003, respectively). Neighbourhood availability of rice stores showed an independent inverse association with urinary K (P for trend=003), whereas neighbourhood availability of supermarkets/grocery stores conversely showed an independent positive association with this variable (P for trend=003). Furthermore, neighbourhood availability of fruit/vegetable stores showed an independent inverse association with the ratio of Na to K (P for trend=0049). In a group of young Japanese women, increasing neighbourhood availability of supermarkets/grocery stores and fruit/vegetable stores and decreasing availability of confectionery stores/bakeries and rice stores were associated with favourable profiles of 24h urinary K (and Na) excretion. © The Authors 2010. Source


Murakami K.,University of Tokyo | Sasaki S.,University of Tokyo | Takahashi Y.,Wayo Womens University | Uenishi K.,Kagawa Nutrition University
Nutrition | Year: 2010

Objective: An increasing number of studies in Western countries have shown that living in a socioeconomically disadvantaged neighborhood is associated with unfavorable dietary intake patterns and health status. However, information on such neighborhood socioeconomic differences in diet and health among different cultural settings, including Japan, is limited. This cross-sectional study examined the association of neighborhood socioeconomic status (SES) with dietary intake and a summary score of the insulin resistance syndrome (IRS) in a group of young Japanese women. Methods: Subjects were 1081 female Japanese dietetic students aged 18 to 22 y residing in 295 municipalities in Japan. Neighborhood SES index was defined by seven municipal-level variables, namely unemployment, household overcrowding, poverty, education, income, home ownership, and vulnerable group, with an increasing index signifying increasing neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage. Dietary intake was estimated using a validated, comprehensive self-administered diet-history questionnaire. Measurements of body mass index, systolic blood pressure, fasting high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triacylglycerol, glucose, and insulin were combined into an IRS score, with an increasing score signifying increasing levels of components of the IRS. Results: Neighborhood SES index was not associated with most of the dietary variables, body mass index, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triacylglycerol, or glucose. However, neighborhood SES index was significantly positively associated with systolic blood pressure, insulin, and IRS score, after adjustment for potential confounding or mediating factors, including household SES, dietary, and lifestyle factors. Conclusion: Neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage was associated with unfavorable profiles of the IRS score, but not dietary intake, in a group of young Japanese women. © 2010 Elsevier Inc. Source


Sato-Mito N.,Azabu University | Sasaki S.,University of Tokyo | Murakami K.,University of Tokyo | Okubo H.,University of Tokyo | And 4 more authors.
Sleep Medicine | Year: 2011

Objectives: How human chronotype is correlated to nutrient and food-group intakes and dietary behavior remains to be elucidated. We cross-sectionally examined the association between the midpoint of sleep and these dietary variables in young Japanese women. A calculated halfway point between bedtime and rise time was used as midpoint of sleep. Methods: The subjects were 3304 female Japanese dietetics students aged 18-20. years from 53 institutions in Japan. Dietary intake during the previous month was assessed by a validated, self-administered diet history questionnaire. The midpoint of sleep was calculated using self-reported bedtimes and rise times. Results: Late midpoint of sleep was significantly negatively associated with the percentage of energy from protein and carbohydrates, and the energy-adjusted intake of cholesterol, potassium, calcium, magnesium, iron, zinc, vitamin A, vitamin D, thiamin, riboflavin, vitamin B6, folate, rice, vegetables, pulses, eggs, and milk and milk products. It was also significantly positively associated with the percentage of energy from alcohol and fat, and the energy-adjusted intake of noodles, confections, fat and oil, and meat. Furthermore, subjects with a later midpoint of sleep tended to begin meals later, eat for a longer time, skip meals more frequently, and watch TV at meals, not only at breakfast but also at lunch and dinner. Conclusions: The midpoint of sleep is significantly associated with dietary intake of certain nutrients and foods and other dietary behaviors in young Japanese women. This finding may contribute to consider the relationships between chronotype and dietary intakes and behaviors. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. Source

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