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Boxtel, Netherlands

Benedetti L.,WaterWays | Langeveld J.,Technical University of Delft | Langeveld J.,Royal Haskoning | Comeau A.,Stantec Inc. | And 9 more authors.
Water Science and Technology | Year: 2013

While the general principles and modelling approaches for integrated management/modelling of urban water systems already present a decade ago still hold, in recent years aspects like model interfacing and wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) influent generation as complements to sewer modelling have been investigated and several new or improved systems analysis methods have become available. New/improved software tools coupled with the current high computational capacity have enabled the application of integrated modelling to several practical cases, and advancements in monitoring water quantity and quality have been substantial and now allow the collecting of data in sufficient quality and quantity to permit using integrated models for real-time applications too. Further developments are warranted in the field of data quality assurance and efficient maintenance. © IWA Publishing 2013. Source


Langeveld J.,Royal Haskoning | Langeveld J.,Technical University of Delft | Nopens I.,Ghent University | Schilperoort R.,Royal Haskoning | And 4 more authors.
Water Science and Technology | Year: 2013

Modeling of integrated urban water systems (IUWS) has seen a rapid development in recent years. Models and software are available that describe the process dynamics in sewers, wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), receiving water systems as well as at the interfaces between the submodels. Successful applications of integrated modeling are, however, relatively scarce. One of the reasons for this is the lack of high-quality monitoring data with the required spatial and temporal resolution and accuracy to calibrate and validate the integrated models, even though the state of the art of monitoring itself is no longer the limiting factor. This paper discusses the efforts to be able to meet the data requirements associated with integrated modeling and describes the methods applied to validate the monitoring data and to use submodels as software sensor to provide the necessary input for other submodels. The main conclusion of the paper is that state of the art monitoring is in principle sufficient to provide the data necessary to calibrate integrated models, but practical limitations resulting in incomplete data-sets hamper widespread application. In order to overcome these difficulties, redundancy of future monitoring networks should be increased and, at the same time, data handling (including data validation, mining and assimilation) should receive much more attention. © IWA Publishing 2013. Source


Langeveld J.G.,Technical University of Delft | Benedetti L.,WaterWays | de Klein J.J.M.,Wageningen University | Nopens I.,Ghent University | And 5 more authors.
Urban Water Journal | Year: 2013

The KALLISTO project aims at finding cost-efficient sets of measures to meet the Water Framework Directive (WFD) derived goals for the river Dommel. Within the project, both acute and long term impacts of the urban wastewater system on the chemical and ecological quality of the river are studied with an integral monitoring campaign in the urban wastewater system (WWTP and sewers) and in the river. Based on this monitoring campaign, detailed models were calibrated. These models are partly simplified and integrated in a single model, which is validated using the detailed submodels. The integrated model was used to study the potential for impact-based real-time control (RTC). Impact based RTC proved to be able to improve the quality of the receiving waters significantly, although additional measures remain necessary to be able to meet the WFD requirements. © 2013 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC. Source


Benedetti L.,WaterWays | Langeveld J.,Technical University of Delft | Nieuwenhuijzen A.F.V.,Witteveen Bos | Jonge J.D.,Waterschap de Dommel | And 5 more authors.
Water Science and Technology | Year: 2013

This project aims at finding cost-efficient sets of measures to meet the Water Framework Directive (WFD) derived goals for the Dommel River (The Netherlands). Within the project, both acute and longterm impacts of the urban wastewater system on the chemical and ecological quality of the river are studied with a monitoring campaign in the urban wastewater system (wastewater treatment plant and sewers) and in the receiving surface water system. An integrated model, which proved to be a powerful tool to analyse the interactions within the integrated urban wastewater system, was first used to evaluate measures in the urban wastewater system using the existing infrastructure and new real-time control strategies. As the latter resulted to be beneficial but not sufficient, this paper investigated the use of additional infrastructural measures to improve the system cost-effectively and have it meet the Directive's goals. Finally, an uncertainty analysis was conducted to investigate the impact of uncertainty in the main model assumptions and model parameters on the performance robustness of the selected set of measures. Apart from some extreme worst-case scenarios, the proposed set of measures turned out to be sufficiently robust. Due to the substantial savings obtained with the results of this project, the pay-back time of the whole monitoring and modelling work proved to be less than 5 months. This illustrates the power of mathematical modelling for decision support in the context of complex urban water systems. © 2013 IWA Publishing. Source


Cierkens K.,Applied BioMath | Plano S.,Applied BioMath | Benedetti L.,Applied BioMath | Benedetti L.,WaterWays | And 3 more authors.
Water Science and Technology | Year: 2012

Application of activated sludge models (ASMs) to full-scale wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) is still hampered by the problem of model calibration of these over-parameterised models. This either requires expert knowledge or global methods that explore a large parameter space. However, a better balance in structure between the submodels (ASM, hydraulic, aeration, etc.) and improved quality of influent data result in much smaller calibration efforts. In this contribution, a methodology is proposed that links data frequency and model structure to calibration quality and output uncertainty. It is composed of defining the model structure, the input data, an automated calibration, confidence interval computation and uncertainty propagation to the model output. Apart from the last step, the methodology is applied to an existing WWTP using three models differing only in the aeration submodel. A sensitivity analysis was performed on all models, allowing the ranking of the most important parameters to select in the subsequent calibration step. The aeration submodel proved very important to get good NH 4 predictions. Finally, the impact of data frequency was explored. Lowering the frequency resulted in larger deviations of parameter estimates from their default values and larger confidence intervals. Autocorrelation due to high frequency calibration data has an opposite effect on the confidence intervals. The proposed methodology opens doors to facilitate and improve calibration efforts and to design measurement campaigns. © IWA Publishing 2012. Source

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