Precision Water Resources Engineering

Denver, CO, United States

Precision Water Resources Engineering

Denver, CO, United States
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Coleman M.L.,Precision Water Resources Engineering | Green T.R.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | David O.,Colorado State University | Merkel W.H.,U.S. Department of Agriculture | And 3 more authors.
Applied Engineering in Agriculture | Year: 2016

Despite its simplicity and limitations, the runoff curve number method remains a widely-used hydrologic modeling tool, and its use through the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) computer application WinTR-20 is expected to continue for the foreseeable future. To facilitate timely updates and revisions and to enable online deployment, a web service version of TR-20, the computational engine of WinTR-20 was developed and implemented through a partnership of the NRCS, the USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) and Colorado State University (CSU). The TR-20 web service provides the full computational abilities of the WinTR-20 application, but does not include the graphical user interface and its supporting features. By implementing TR-20 as a service, this model is more accessible and can be reused and repurposed for other current and future applications. Although the web service is currently intended for use by NRCS, it is accessible by the general public, both by direct access and through a website that provides a simple application of the web service. © 2016, American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers. All rights reserved.


Wright L.,Independent Consultant | Chinowsky P.,University of Colorado at Boulder | Strzepek K.,Massachusetts Institute of Technology | Jones R.,Stratus Consulting | And 6 more authors.
Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change | Year: 2012

We assessed the potential impacts of increased river flooding from climate change on bridges in the continental United States. Daily precipitation statistics from four climate models and three greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions scenarios (A2, A1B, and B1) were used to capture a range of potential changes in climate. Using changes in maximum daily precipitation, we estimated changes to the peak flow rates for the 100-year return period for 2,097 watersheds. These estimates were then combined with information from the National Bridge Inventory database to estimate changes to bridge scour vulnerability. The results indicate that there may be significant potential risks to bridges in the United States from increased precipitation intensities. Approximately 129,000 bridges were found to be currently deficient. Tens of thousands to more than 100,000 bridges could be vulnerable to increased river flows. Results by region vary considerably. In general, more bridges in eastern areas are vulnerable than those in western areas. The highest GHG emissions scenarios result in the largest number of bridges being at risk. The costs of adapting vulnerable bridges to avoid increased damage associated with climate change vary from approximately $140 to $250 billion through the 21st century. If these costs were spread out evenly over the century, the annual costs would be several billion dollars. The costs of protecting the bridges against climate change risks could be reduced by approximately 30% if existing deficient bridges are improved with riprap. © 2012 The Author(s).

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