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News Article | May 12, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke today announced that the Bureau of Reclamation awarded $23,619,391 to communities in seven states for planning, designing and constructing water recycling and re-use projects; developing feasibility studies; and researching desalination and water recycling projects. The funding is part of the Title XVI Water Reclamation and Reuse program. "This funding provides essential tools for stretching limited water supplies by helping communities reclaim and reuse wastewater and impaired ground or surface waters,” said Secretary Zinke. “These tools are just part of the toolkit for bridging the gap between water supply and demand and thus making water supplies more drought-resistant. In addition to this funding, Reclamation is actively supporting state and local partners in their efforts to boost water storage capacity." Title XVI Authorized Projects are authorized by Congress and receive funding for planning, design and/or construction activities on a project-specific basis. Six projects will receive $20,980,129. They are: ● City of Pasadena Water and Power Department (California), Pasadena Non-Potable Water Project, Phase I, $2,000,000 ● City of San Diego (California), San Diego Area Water Reclamation Program, $4,200,000 ● Hi-Desert Water District (California), Hi-Desert District Wastewater Reclamation Project, $4,000,000 ● Inland Empire Utilities Agency (California), Lower Chino Dairy Area Desalination and Reclamation Project, $5,199,536 ● Padre Dam Municipal Water District (California), San Diego Area Water Reclamation Program, $3,900,000 ● Santa Clara Valley Water District (California), South Santa Clara County Recycled Water Project, $1,680,593 Title XVI Feasibility Studies are for entities that would like to develop new water reclamation and reuse feasibility studies. Thirteen projects will receive $1,791,561. They are: ● City of Ada Public Works Authority (Oklahoma), Reuse Feasibility Study for the City of Ada, Oklahoma, $136,193 ● City of Bartlesville (Oklahoma), Feasibility Study to Augment Bartlesville Water Supply with Drought-Resilient Reclaimed Water, $150,000 ● City of Garden City (Kansas), Strategic Plan for Reuse Effluent Water Resources in Garden City, Kansas, and Vicinity, $65,368 ● City of Quincy (Washington), Quincy 1 Water Resource Management Improvement Feasibility Study for Comprehensive Wastewater Reuse and Water Supply Project, $150,000 ● El Paso Water Utilities - Public Services Board (Texas), Aquifer Storage-Recovery with Reclaimed Water to Preserve Hueco Bolson using Enhanced Arroyo Infiltration for Wetlands, and Secondary Reducing Local Power Plant Reclaimed Water Demand, $150,000 ● Kitsap County (Washington), Feasibility Study for a comprehensive water reuse project at the Kitsap County Kingston Wastewater Treatment Plant, $150,000. ● Las Virgenes Municipal Water District (California), Pure Water Project Las Virgenes Municipal Water District, $150,000 ● North Alamo Water Supply Corporation (Texas), Feasibility Study of Energy-Efficient Alternatives for Brackish Groundwater Desalination for the North Alamo Water Supply Corporation, $90,000 ● Oklahoma Water Resources Board (Oklahoma), Feasibility Study of Potential Impacts of Select Alternative Produced Water Management and Reuse Scenarios, $150,000 ● Soquel Creek Water District (California), Pure Water Soquel - Replenishing Mid-County Groundwater with Groundwater with Purified Recycled Water, $150,000 ● Valley Center Municipal Water District (California), Lower Moosa Canyon Wastewater Recycling, Reuse, and sub-regional Brine Disposal Project, $150,000 ● Washoe County (Nevada), Northern Nevada Indirect Potable Reuse Feasibility Study, $150,000 ● Weber Basin Water Conservancy District (Utah), Weber Basin Water Conservancy District Reuse Feasibility Study, $150,000 The Title XVI Program will provide funding for research to establish or expand water reuse markets, improve or expand existing water reuse facilities, and streamline the implementation of clean water technology at new facilities. Four projects will receive $847,701. They are: ● City of San Diego (California), Demonstrating Innovative Control of Biological Fouling of Microfiltration/Ultrafiltration and Reverse Osmosis Membranes and Enhanced Chemical and Energy Efficiency in Potable Water, $300,000 ● City of San Diego (California), Site-Specific Analytical Testing of RO Brine Impacts to the Treatment Process, $48,526 ● Kansas Water Office (Kansas), Pilot Test Project for Produced Water near Hardtner, Kansas, $199,175 ● Las Virgenes Municipal Water District (California), Pure Water Project Las Virgenes-Truinfo Demonstration Project, $300,000 Reclamation provides funding through the Title XVI Water Reclamation and Reuse Program for projects that reclaim and reuse municipal, industrial, domestic or agricultural wastewater and naturally impaired ground or surface waters. Reclaimed water can be used for a variety of purposes, such as environmental restoration, fish and wildlife, groundwater recharge, municipal, domestic, industrial, agricultural, power generation or recreation. Since 1992, Title XVI funding has been used to provide communities with new sources of clean water, while promoting water and energy efficiency and environmental stewardship. In that time, approximately $672 million in federal funding has been leveraged with non-federal funding to implement more than $3.3 billion in water reuse improvements. To learn more about Title XVI and these awards, please visit https://www.usbr.gov/watersmart/title.


This week’s news that Australian customs officers incinerated irreplaceable plant specimens has shocked botanists around the world, and left many concerned about possible impacts on international research exchanges. Some have put a freeze on sending samples to Australia until they are assured that their packages won’t meet a similar fate, and others are discussing broader ways of assuring safe passage of priceless specimens. "This story is likely to have a major chilling effect on the loan system between herbaria across national boundaries," says Austin Mast, president of the Society of Herbarium Curators and director of the herbarium at Florida State University in Tallahassee. "Without the free sharing of specimens, the pace of plant diversity research slows." As a result of the customs debacle, curators in New Zealand put a stay on shipping samples to Australia. So has the New York Botanical Garden in New York City, which holds the second largest collection of preserved plants in the world. "We, and many other herbaria, will not send specimens to Australia until we are sure this situation will not be repeated," says herbarium Director Barbara Thiers. Herbaria are guardians of plant biodiversity data. Around the world, about 3000 institutions keep a total of 350 million plants specimens that have been pressed, dried, and stored in cabinets. Some are hundreds of years old; others are rare examples of extinct species. Particularly valuable are so-called type specimens, used to describe species for the first time. Botanists consult these when they are identifying new species or revising taxonomy. Many herbaria have digitized images of their specimens, allowing initial research to be conducted remotely. But some details must be examined first-hand. To do that, biologists often request specimens through a kind of interlibrary loan. "The system works well when the risk of damage or destruction of loaned specimens is perceived to be very low," Mast says. But sometimes things go awry. Earlier this week, many botanists learned about the destruction of six type specimens of daisies—some collected during a French expedition to Australia from 1791 to 1793—which the National Museum of Natural History (NMNH) in Paris had mailed along with 99 other specimens to the Queensland Herbarium in Brisbane, Australia. After the package arrived in Brisbane in early January, the specimens were held up at customs because the paperwork was incomplete. Biosecurity officers asked the Queensland Herbarium for a list of the specimens and how they were preserved, but the herbarium sent its responses to the wrong email address, delaying the response by many weeks. In March, the officers requested clarification, but then incinerated the samples. "It's like taking a painting from the Louvre and burning it," says James Solomon, herbarium curator at the Missouri Botanical Garden in St. Louis. According to Australia’s Department of Agriculture and Water Resources, which enforces biosecurity rules, part of the problem was that the samples had a declared value of $2—and its agents routinely destroy low-value items that have been kept longer than 30 days. Michel Guiraud, director of collections at NMNH, says his museum's policy is to put minimal values on shipments. "If it is irreplaceable, there is no way to put an insurance value on it," he says. Guiraud says the package was sent with the usual documentation and he's trying to find out what went wrong. Concerned about the possibility of other scientific samples being destroyed, the museum is considering stopping loans from all of its collections to Australia. Australia’s agriculture department admitted in a statement that it erred in prematurely destroying the specimens, but didn't take sole responsibility for the snafu. "This is a deeply regrettable occurrence, but it does highlight the importance of the shared responsibility of Australia’s biosecurity system, and the need for adherence to import conditions." The department has reviewed its procedures for handling delayed items and is considering how package labels could highlight the “intrinsic value” of scientific specimens. On Monday, officials met with representatives from a consortium of Australasian herbaria to help them understand and comply with importation rules. "At this stage it appears we are resolving the matter very positively," says botanist Michelle Waycott of the University of Adelaide in Australia and the Council of Heads of Australasian Herbaria. A second incident came to light after botanists at the Allan Herbarium in Lincoln, New Zealand, heard last month about the destruction of the French specimens. They inquired about six lichen samples, including a type specimen of Buellia macularis, that they had shipped to the Australian National Herbarium in Canberra last year. It turned out the specimens had been destroyed in October 2016 by biosecurity officers in Sydney, Australia. The department is investigating what happened in this case. New Zealand herbaria have suspended loans to Australia while they wait for written guarantees that their specimens will be safe. “We are disappointed we have lost an important part of our collection but we’re looking forward to further international collaboration,” said Ilse Breitwieser, director of the Allan Herbarium, in a statement this week. Curators elsewhere are reviewing how they ship samples internationally. "We will rethink our policy of lending specimens to countries that would pose a risk for loss of collections," says Christine Niezgoda, collections manager of flowering plants at the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago, Illinois, who, like others, was surprised to learn that specimens would be destroyed rather than returned. The Society for the Preservation of Natural History Collections, which is following the situation in Australia, hopes to increase communication among curators about shipping regulations and border inspection procedures. A long-standing frustration for many is that the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), like its counterpart in Australia, does not have a separate category for low-risk scientific specimens. "The way that the U.S. and Australian governments are treating these shipments is basically going to bring taxonomic work to a halt," says Ellen Dean, curator of the Center for Plant Diversity at the University of California, Davis. "We are thinking of no longer loaning our specimens to other countries, because we are uncertain that APHIS will allow our own specimens back into this country." Whatever the destination, veterans emphasize that every detail matters, even the most obvious. "Nothing derails a shipment faster than a wrong address," says Thiers, who maintains a public database of herbaria addresses and contact information. "Sometimes they don't get returned for years, and unless you take extraordinary measures, you won't get them back." (With the volume of specimens that get mailed from the New York Botanic Garden—up to 30,000 a year—Thiers can't afford tracked shipments and uses cheaper library rate shipping.) Even the most diligent curators confess to late-night worries. "Any time you let something go out the door, there's a risk," says Solomon, who is continuing to send specimens to Australia. "The benefit from making the material available far outweighs the risk." Says Niezgoda: "Collections are meant to be used to promote scientific inquiry and this should not change."


News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

SYDNEY (AP) — Australian quarantine officials have acknowledged that they reacted a bit too hastily when they destroyed a rare, centuries-old collection of plants from France due to paperwork problems. The Museum of Natural History in Paris sent the flowering plant specimens to a research center in Australia's Queensland state. When the plants arrived in Australia in January, officials determined that the accompanying paperwork failed to comply with the country's notoriously strict quarantine rules. Quarantine authorities then tried to get proper documentation from the Queensland Herbarium, but before they could, biosecurity officers destroyed the plants, the Department of Agriculture and Water Resources said in a statement Tuesday. Michelle Waycott, who heads the Council of Heads of Australasian Herbaria, told the Australian Broadcasting Corp. that the specimens dated back to the mid-1800s and were irreplaceable. Australia has some of the world's toughest quarantine regulations in a bid to keep pests and diseases from infiltrating its isolated borders and destroying the country's unique wildlife. The strict quarantine policies captured global attention in 2015, when Johnny Depp and his then-wife, Amber Heard, were accused of illegally bringing their pet Yorkshire Terriers into Australia, where Depp was working on a movie. According to the agriculture department, the plants arrived in early January with a declared value of 2 Australian dollars ($1.50) and no indication of their significance. The attached documents failed to include information such as what the specimens were and whether they were preserved, so the department held onto the package while officials worked to get those details. The Queensland Herbarium then called the department saying it would provide the additional documentation, but didn't do so until March 3. Those documents were still deemed insufficient, so the department said it requested more information. By the end of March, no further documents had arrived and the plants were thus destroyed, the department said. The agriculture department said it hung onto the plant specimens for 46 days longer than what is normally required while officials worked to sort out the documentation. But the agency conceded that destroying the plants was "premature," given that officials and the herbarium were still working to sort out the issue. Officials at the Queensland Herbarium declined to comment. The department said it had conducted a review and would take steps to avoid such an incident from happening again.


News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: hosted2.ap.org

(AP) — Australian quarantine officials have acknowledged that they reacted a bit too hastily when they destroyed a rare, centuries-old collection of plants from France due to paperwork problems. The Museum of Natural History in Paris sent the flowering plant specimens to a research center in Australia's Queensland state. When the plants arrived in Australia in January, officials determined that the accompanying paperwork failed to comply with the country's notoriously strict quarantine rules. Quarantine authorities then tried to get proper documentation from the Queensland Herbarium, but before they could, biosecurity officers destroyed the plants, the Department of Agriculture and Water Resources said in a statement Tuesday. Michelle Waycott, who heads the Council of Heads of Australasian Herbaria, told the Australian Broadcasting Corp. that the specimens dated back to the mid-1800s and were irreplaceable. Australia has some of the world's toughest quarantine regulations in a bid to keep pests and diseases from infiltrating its isolated borders and destroying the country's unique wildlife. The strict quarantine policies captured global attention in 2015, when Johnny Depp and his then-wife, Amber Heard, were accused of illegally bringing their pet Yorkshire Terriers into Australia, where Depp was working on a movie. According to the agriculture department, the plants arrived in early January with a declared value of 2 Australian dollars ($1.50) and no indication of their significance. The attached documents failed to include information such as what the specimens were and whether they were preserved, so the department held onto the package while officials worked to get those details. The Queensland Herbarium then called the department saying it would provide the additional documentation, but didn't do so until March 3. Those documents were still deemed insufficient, so the department said it requested more information. By the end of March, no further documents had arrived and the plants were thus destroyed, the department said. The agriculture department said it hung onto the plant specimens for 46 days longer than what is normally required while officials worked to sort out the documentation. But the agency conceded that destroying the plants was "premature," given that officials and the herbarium were still working to sort out the issue. Officials at the Queensland Herbarium declined to comment. The department said it had conducted a review and would take steps to avoid such an incident from happening again.


News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

HIGHLAND, CA--(Marketwired - May 10, 2017) -  The State Water Resources Control Board recently awarded the Sterling Natural Resource Center with a crucial permit necessary for advancing its state-of-the-art recycled water facility. The State Board issued its decision to authorize a 1211 permit to allow up to 10 million gallons of recycled water daily to recharge the Bunker Hill Basin. The decision grants the San Bernardino Valley Municipal Water District (Valley District) the authority to recycle water generated by East Valley Water District customers, treat it and recharge it into local aquifers for use in future years. "The issuance of this permit was a critical milestone for the Sterling Natural Resource Center to move forward," said Valley District Board President Susan Longville. "This project is just one part of our efforts throughout the San Bernardino Valley to help create new sources of water that will serve our local communities especially in times of extended drought like the one we just experienced." East Valley Water District Board Chairman Ron Coats said the project offers many added benefits to the community, including hundreds of temporary construction jobs. The project will also indirectly initiate nearly 1,400 jobs in and around the community, and offers training and educational opportunities to local students in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) studies. "In addition to the Sterling Natural Resource Center providing recycled water, we have a unique opportunity to take it a step further," Coats said. "We will be able to use a public resource to engage and serve the community in a much-needed way." The 1211 permit approval is just one of many milestones the SNRC is celebrating. Recently, SNRC also received its Section 7 authorization, a positive determination of the project's Environmental Impact Report (EIR) by federal agencies, including the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Army Corp of Engineers. The Section 7 authorization combined with the 1211 permit confirms that the project meets all requirements to qualify for state loans and grants. Once a formal funding agreement is in place, SNRC will select a design-build firm and move forward with the design process. The SNRC, a Valley District project in cooperation with East Valley Water District, will recharge the local groundwater basin. Once built, the facility will provide a new water source for the Inland Empire region, will help to boost water reliability and create new habitat for the Santa Ana Sucker. About Sterling Natural Resource Center The Sterling Natural Resource Center (SNRC) is a state-of-the-art facility in Highland, California, that will provide a sustainable new water supply to boost the region's water independence. Capable of treating up to 10 million gallons a day, the SNRC recharges the local Bunker Hill Groundwater Basin and creates new opportunities for the surrounding community in the form of education and training, community space, neighborhood improvements, and new habitat for the Santa Ana Sucker fish. Located on North Del Rosa Drive between East Fifth and East Sixth Streets, the SNRC is a project of the San Bernardino Valley Municipal Water District and treats wastewater generated within East Valley Water District's service area. For more information visit www.sterlingnrc.com and follow the project on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.. About San Bernardino Valley Municipal Water District San Bernardino Valley Municipal Water District (Valley District) was formed in 1954 to import supplemental water. As a regional water provider, they bring water into its service area through participation in the State Water Project (SWP) and manage groundwater storage within its boundaries. Valley District covers 353 square miles in southwestern San Bernardino County and serves a population of approximately 770,000. The District boundary spans the eastern two-thirds of the San Bernardino Valley, and the cities of San Bernardino, Colton, Loma Linda, Redlands, Rialto, Bloomington, Highland, Mentone, Grand Terrace, and Yucaipa. For more visit www.sbvmwd.com. About East Valley Water District East Valley Water District was formed in 1954 and provides water and wastewater collection services to more than 100,000 residents within the City of Highland and portions of both the City and County of San Bernardino. EVWD operates under the direction of a five-member elected Board. More information is available at www.eastvalley.org.


News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: winetitles.com.au

The 2017–18 Federal Budget has delivered on all commitments to Australia’s agricultural industries made by the Turnbull Government at the 2016 election. Assistant Minister for Agriculture and Water Resources, Anne Ruston, said the Budget handed down this week included important provisions for natural resources management, wine industry exports and innovation in the forestry sector. “I welcome the new $1.1 billion investment in our National Landcare Program – which is actually an investment in all those volunteers who are out there improving our land and water resources for the benefit of our current and future generations,” Minister Ruston said. “This year’s Budget also includes the $50 million Export and Regional Wine Support Package to promote Australian wine tourism at home and abroad. “This four-year program will provide promotion of our wine regions in overseas and domestic markets as well as helping our wine producers and exporters access new markets or get a competitive edge in an existing market. “I’m looking forward to the $10 million Wine Tourism and Cellar Door Grant programme being available from 2019–20. It will make grants of up to $100,000 available to wine producers for their cellar door sales when they exceed their Wine Equalisation Tax (WET) Rebate. “This initiative will encourage wine producers to invest in their cellar door facilities to improve the experience of tourists, attracting more foot traffic and increasing sales. “We’re providing a third of the total funding for the National Institute for Forest Products Innovation – a joint investment between the Australian Government, the South Australian and Tasmanian governments and industry to encourage innovation in forest management, timber processing, wood fibre recovery and advance manufacturing. “Wood is a renewable resource and an important component of Australia’s emerging bio-based economy where we can look to get the most out of all of the parts of the tree and limit waste.”


LOS ANGELES--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Poised to put more water in storage in 2017 than any year in history, Metropolitan Water District’s Board of Directors today urged local agencies to continue water savings through voluntary conservation measures. A month after Gov. Jerry Brown declared an end to the statewide drought emergency, Metropolitan’s board approved the voluntary approach given the importance of maintaining lower levels of demands into the years ahead. Officially, a voluntary conservation approach is termed by Metropolitan a Water Supply Watch condition. “This level reflects the public’s remarkable water-saving response and our conservation and outreach programs prior to and during the five-year drought, which were critical in helping us sustain demand cutbacks,” said Metropolitan board Chairman Randy Record. “As our current advertising and outreach campaign says, the drought emergency may be over, but we all need to get in the lifelong habit of saving water,” he added. Water supply gains from significantly improved statewide hydrologic conditions were another reason for the board’s action. Last month, California broke the record for the wettest year ever in the northern Sierra, prompting the Department of Water Resources to increase its State Water Project allocation to 85 percent. Under the allocation, Metropolitan will have access to nearly 1.7 million acre-feet of water from the state project this year. Metropolitan General Manager Jeffrey Kightlinger said the district will maximize state project deliveries by putting as much as 1 million acre-feet of water or more in reserves this year. (An acre-foot is about 326,000 gallons, enough water to supply two typical Southland households for a year.) “Although 1 million acre-feet would be the largest single-year storage increase in Metropolitan’s history, it will not return regional reserves to pre-drought levels,” Kightlinger cautioned. “That’s why all of us should voluntarily continue to embrace our water-saving practices.” The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California is a state-established cooperative of 26 cities and water agencies serving nearly 19 million people in six counties. The district imports water from the Colorado River and Northern California to supplement local supplies, and helps its members to develop increased water conservation, recycling, storage and other resource-management programs.


News Article | May 12, 2017
Site: www.enr.com

An independent forensics team cited thinning concrete and lack of reinforcement as possible causes of a spillway failure in February at California’s massive Oroville Dam. The appearance of a 40-ft hole in the main chute of the nation’s tallest dam led to problems at two other outlets and forced the state’s Dept. of Water Resources to call for the evacuation of almost 200,000 people. On May 10, the agency posted a memo from an independent forensics team that listed possible reasons for the failure. The dam’s overly large slab placement that could have led to the cracking were caused by design flaws when the dam was built 50 years ago, according to the report. Other issues, such as clogged drains due to tree roots, insufficient slab repairs and an increase in spillway discharge shortly before the slab failure, were linked to maintenance and operations. The report also noted the extended drought could have shrunk the soil under an already poorly bonded foundation. Cavitation was deemed to not be a significant factor. The emergency spillway—an unlined hillside—was put into service for the first time in the dam’s history during the February storm and within hours started to show signs of erosion. The report noted the loose soil that led to headcutting in the crest control structure, insufficient energy dissipation at the base of the spillway and absence of erosion protection downstream of the crest structure. Bill Croyle, DWR acting director, said while plans call for improving the emergency spillway, the goal is to increase the safe flow level from the main outlet so the alternative release never has to be used again. The preliminary findings will be “taken into consideration” as the agency develops plans to reconstruct the spillway before November, says Croyle. A final forensics report will not be complete until the fall. A $275 million recovery contract was awarded to Kiewit in April. The agency faced calls from residents and politicians to release the entire forensics report after it did not release details about the contract due to security concerns. The independent forensics team includes six experts from the private and government sectors and academia.


DENVER, May 09, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Pure Energy Minerals Limited (TSX-V:PE) (FRANKFURT:A111EG) (OTCQB:PEMIF) (the “Company” or “Pure Energy”) is pleased to announce results from depth-specific brine samples from exploratory wells CV-7 and CV-8 on the Clayton Valley South Project (the “CVS Project” or the “Project”). Positive indications of lithium enriched brine occurred throughout the screened intervals of the wells, with increased concentrations in deeper samples. The average lithium concentration over the screened interval in CV-7 was 70 milligrams per liter (mg/L) lithium, ranging between 56 and 109 mg/L lithium. The CV-8 samples averaged 134 mg/L, including a range of lithium values from 58 to 229 mg/L. The interval from 640 meters (m) (2,100 feet [ft]) to the bottom of the screening at 867 m (2,845 ft) in CV-8 contained average lithium concentrations of 210 mg/L. The deeper part of the aquifer system in CV-8 thus contains considerable thickness of some of the highest-grade lithium brine yet encountered on the Project. Pumping test samples collected at both wells also yielded consistently high lithium values that may indicate mixing of the brine from the multi-layer aquifer system. The lithium content of brine from the CV-8 pumping test stabilized after only 6 hours of pumping, while lithium values in the CV-7 pumping test became relatively steady after about 12 hours. The stable production of high-lithium brine over the duration of the pumping tests demonstrates potential for sustained production of lithium-bearing brine from the aquifer systems encountered in these wells. Patrick Highsmith, Pure Energy Minerals’ CEO, discussed the data from the Company’s most recent wells, “Our latest drilling at the CVS Project has yielded thick sections of brine-saturated sediments and strong lithium values right to the bottom of the basin. These deeper brines are also very low in calcium and magnesium, which usually translates to favorable process chemistry. We continue to be enthusiastic about the grade, chemistry, and volume potential at depth on the CVS Project. Now that all the data are in, we are updating the drilling database and finalizing the resource model. These are the last inputs needed for the Preliminary Economic Assessment (PEA), and we look forward to completing the economic analysis and sharing the PEA results in the next few weeks.” Thick Sections of Lithium and Good Chemistry in Clayton Valley South Brine Brine samples collected from exploratory wells CV-7 and CV-8 show continuous lithium-enriched brine (greater than 50 mg/L) throughout the screened intervals, culminating in the thickest such section yet seen on the Project at CV-8 of over 654 metres (2,145 feet). While brine is present throughout the section investigated in these recent wells, the brine gets better at depth as the best lithium grades and most favorable chemistry occur at greater than 549 m (1,800 feet) in CV-7 and 640m (2,100 feet) in CV-8 below land surface (bls).  The increased lithium concentrations at depth are accompanied by magnesium to lithium ratios of 1.4 or lower, with most below 1. The calcium content of the deeper brine is also anomalously low. Low magnesium and calcium content of lithium brines is significant, as these elements can interfere with low-cost lithium extraction. Tables 1 and 2 below summarize analytical results for depth-specific brine samples collected from exploratory wells CV-7 and CV-8. Pure Energy’s specialist hydrogeological consultants, Montgomery & Associates (“Montgomery”), designed and conducted pumping tests at CV-7 and CV-8. Pumping tests were operated continuously (48 hours at CV-7, and 72 hours at CV-8) and included collection of brine samples along with extensive hydrogeological data on the brine aquifer system (See news releases dated March 6, 2017 and March 27, 2017). Figure 1 below illustrates lithium concentrations in the pumping-test discharge over the course of each test. Lithium concentrations in the extracted brine rapidly stabilized in both pumping tests, indicating the potential for sustained production of lithium-bearing brine from the CVS aquifer system. Pumping rates were 5 liters per second (80 gallons per minute) for the CV-7 pumping test and 2 liters per second (30 gallons per minute) for the CV-8 pumping test. It is important to note that none of these exploration wells have yet been optimized in their construction to pump from the highest grade or most permeable zones. A graph accompanying this announcement is available at  http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/f5afc65a-8939-452e-9674-f3b00d2f81d1 The CV-7 and CV-8 wells were constructed in the northern portion of the CVS Project. The CV-7 well was drilled using diamond coring methods and reamed by mud rotary methods to a depth of 610 m (2,000 ft) bls, similar in depth to CV-3 during mid-2016. Drillers  applied similar technology at CV-8, where it was cored to a depth of 973 m (3,192 ft) bls then reamed to 890 m (2,920 ft) bls. The CV-8 well is believed to be the deepest well constructed in Clayton Valley to date. This work was performed in accordance with State of Nevada waivers and permits issued to Pure Energy by the Nevada Division of Water Resources and the Division of Environmental Protection, which allowed for exploratory well construction, collection of brine samples, and extraction of brine from the exploratory wells with subsequent discharge to surface during the pumping tests. Company and Montgomery hydrogeologists applied extensive quality assurance measures during this program, including: comparative sampling by different methods, an accredited check laboratory, and the use of blind duplicates, blanks, and analytical controls in laboratory submissions. All analytical data reported in this news release were generated by Western Environmental Testing Laboratory (“WETLAB”) of Sparks, Nevada. WETLAB is accredited by the Nevada State Division of Environmental Protection for determination of lithium, magnesium and other elements in non-potable water by EPA method 200.7. ALS Minerals in Vancouver, British Columbia provides systematic blind and independent check analyses on the lithium and other analytes in the sampling program at CVS.  ALS Minerals operates an industry leading quality management system and is accredited under ISO 17025 for provision of mineral analysis. The comparison between check labs was well within acceptable tolerances. All quality control data from CV-7 and CV-8 complied with the Company’s quality standards. At CV-7, hydrogeologists collected passive no-purge depth-discrete samples using both the Snap Sampler (widely used on the Project) and wireline sampling methods. Comparison of analytical results showed good agreement between the two methods. Walter Weinig, Professional Geologist and SME Registered Member (SME Registered Member # 4168729), is a qualified person as defined by NI 43-101 and supervised the preparation of the scientific and technical information that forms the basis for this news release. Mr. Weinig is not independent of the Company, as he is an officer. Patrick Highsmith, Certified Professional Geologist (AIPG CPG # 11702), is a qualified person as defined by NI 43-101 and has reviewed and approved the scientific and technical information contained in this news release. Mr. Highsmith is not independent of the Company, as he is an officer and director. Pure Energy is a lithium resource developer that is driven to become a low-cost supplier for the growing lithium battery industry. The Company’s  current focus is on the development of the CVS Lithium Brine Project and the adjoining Glory Lithium Clay Project in Clayton Valley, Nevada. Pure Energy also recently acquired a purchase option on a major new lithium brine project in the Lithium Triangle of South America, the Terra Cotta Project (“TCP”).  The TCP is located on Pocitos Salar in Salta, Argentina, where it enjoys some of the best infrastructure and access of any lithium brine exploration project in Argentina. Pure Energy has developed core strengths in innovative development and processing technologies for lithium brines and lithium mineral deposits.  Key attributes and activities include: On behalf of the Board of Directors, “Patrick Highsmith” Chief Executive Officer Forward Looking Statements: The information in this news release contains forward looking statements that are subject to a number of known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause actual results to differ materially from those anticipated in our forward looking statements. Factors that could cause such differences include: technical difficulties in connection with exploration and development activities, technological challenges with the extraction and processing of lithium brines, the speculative nature of mineral exploration, volatile microcap equity markets, changes in world commodity markets, equity markets, costs and supply of materials relevant to the mining industry, change in government and changes to regulations affecting the mining industry, including environmental requirements. Forward-looking statements in this release may include statements regarding mineral processing, estimates of reduced future capital and operating expenses, delivery of a preliminary economic assessment, future exploration programs, operation plans, geological interpretations, and mineral tenure issues. Although we believe the expectations reflected in our forward looking statements are reasonable, results may vary, and we cannot guarantee future results, levels of activity, performance or achievements. Neither TSX Venture Exchange nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in the policies of TSX Venture Exchange) accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release.


DENVER, May 09, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Pure Energy Minerals Limited (TSX-V:PE) (FRANKFURT:A111EG) (OTCQB:PEMIF) (the “Company” or “Pure Energy”) is pleased to announce results from depth-specific brine samples from exploratory wells CV-7 and CV-8 on the Clayton Valley South Project (the “CVS Project” or the “Project”). Positive indications of lithium enriched brine occurred throughout the screened intervals of the wells, with increased concentrations in deeper samples. The average lithium concentration over the screened interval in CV-7 was 70 milligrams per liter (mg/L) lithium, ranging between 56 and 109 mg/L lithium. The CV-8 samples averaged 134 mg/L, including a range of lithium values from 58 to 229 mg/L. The interval from 640 meters (m) (2,100 feet [ft]) to the bottom of the screening at 867 m (2,845 ft) in CV-8 contained average lithium concentrations of 210 mg/L. The deeper part of the aquifer system in CV-8 thus contains considerable thickness of some of the highest-grade lithium brine yet encountered on the Project. Pumping test samples collected at both wells also yielded consistently high lithium values that may indicate mixing of the brine from the multi-layer aquifer system. The lithium content of brine from the CV-8 pumping test stabilized after only 6 hours of pumping, while lithium values in the CV-7 pumping test became relatively steady after about 12 hours. The stable production of high-lithium brine over the duration of the pumping tests demonstrates potential for sustained production of lithium-bearing brine from the aquifer systems encountered in these wells. Patrick Highsmith, Pure Energy Minerals’ CEO, discussed the data from the Company’s most recent wells, “Our latest drilling at the CVS Project has yielded thick sections of brine-saturated sediments and strong lithium values right to the bottom of the basin. These deeper brines are also very low in calcium and magnesium, which usually translates to favorable process chemistry. We continue to be enthusiastic about the grade, chemistry, and volume potential at depth on the CVS Project. Now that all the data are in, we are updating the drilling database and finalizing the resource model. These are the last inputs needed for the Preliminary Economic Assessment (PEA), and we look forward to completing the economic analysis and sharing the PEA results in the next few weeks.” Thick Sections of Lithium and Good Chemistry in Clayton Valley South Brine Brine samples collected from exploratory wells CV-7 and CV-8 show continuous lithium-enriched brine (greater than 50 mg/L) throughout the screened intervals, culminating in the thickest such section yet seen on the Project at CV-8 of over 654 metres (2,145 feet). While brine is present throughout the section investigated in these recent wells, the brine gets better at depth as the best lithium grades and most favorable chemistry occur at greater than 549 m (1,800 feet) in CV-7 and 640m (2,100 feet) in CV-8 below land surface (bls).  The increased lithium concentrations at depth are accompanied by magnesium to lithium ratios of 1.4 or lower, with most below 1. The calcium content of the deeper brine is also anomalously low. Low magnesium and calcium content of lithium brines is significant, as these elements can interfere with low-cost lithium extraction. Tables 1 and 2 below summarize analytical results for depth-specific brine samples collected from exploratory wells CV-7 and CV-8. Pure Energy’s specialist hydrogeological consultants, Montgomery & Associates (“Montgomery”), designed and conducted pumping tests at CV-7 and CV-8. Pumping tests were operated continuously (48 hours at CV-7, and 72 hours at CV-8) and included collection of brine samples along with extensive hydrogeological data on the brine aquifer system (See news releases dated March 6, 2017 and March 27, 2017). Figure 1 below illustrates lithium concentrations in the pumping-test discharge over the course of each test. Lithium concentrations in the extracted brine rapidly stabilized in both pumping tests, indicating the potential for sustained production of lithium-bearing brine from the CVS aquifer system. Pumping rates were 5 liters per second (80 gallons per minute) for the CV-7 pumping test and 2 liters per second (30 gallons per minute) for the CV-8 pumping test. It is important to note that none of these exploration wells have yet been optimized in their construction to pump from the highest grade or most permeable zones. A graph accompanying this announcement is available at  http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/f5afc65a-8939-452e-9674-f3b00d2f81d1 The CV-7 and CV-8 wells were constructed in the northern portion of the CVS Project. The CV-7 well was drilled using diamond coring methods and reamed by mud rotary methods to a depth of 610 m (2,000 ft) bls, similar in depth to CV-3 during mid-2016. Drillers  applied similar technology at CV-8, where it was cored to a depth of 973 m (3,192 ft) bls then reamed to 890 m (2,920 ft) bls. The CV-8 well is believed to be the deepest well constructed in Clayton Valley to date. This work was performed in accordance with State of Nevada waivers and permits issued to Pure Energy by the Nevada Division of Water Resources and the Division of Environmental Protection, which allowed for exploratory well construction, collection of brine samples, and extraction of brine from the exploratory wells with subsequent discharge to surface during the pumping tests. Company and Montgomery hydrogeologists applied extensive quality assurance measures during this program, including: comparative sampling by different methods, an accredited check laboratory, and the use of blind duplicates, blanks, and analytical controls in laboratory submissions. All analytical data reported in this news release were generated by Western Environmental Testing Laboratory (“WETLAB”) of Sparks, Nevada. WETLAB is accredited by the Nevada State Division of Environmental Protection for determination of lithium, magnesium and other elements in non-potable water by EPA method 200.7. ALS Minerals in Vancouver, British Columbia provides systematic blind and independent check analyses on the lithium and other analytes in the sampling program at CVS.  ALS Minerals operates an industry leading quality management system and is accredited under ISO 17025 for provision of mineral analysis. The comparison between check labs was well within acceptable tolerances. All quality control data from CV-7 and CV-8 complied with the Company’s quality standards. At CV-7, hydrogeologists collected passive no-purge depth-discrete samples using both the Snap Sampler (widely used on the Project) and wireline sampling methods. Comparison of analytical results showed good agreement between the two methods. Walter Weinig, Professional Geologist and SME Registered Member (SME Registered Member # 4168729), is a qualified person as defined by NI 43-101 and supervised the preparation of the scientific and technical information that forms the basis for this news release. Mr. Weinig is not independent of the Company, as he is an officer. Patrick Highsmith, Certified Professional Geologist (AIPG CPG # 11702), is a qualified person as defined by NI 43-101 and has reviewed and approved the scientific and technical information contained in this news release. Mr. Highsmith is not independent of the Company, as he is an officer and director. Pure Energy is a lithium resource developer that is driven to become a low-cost supplier for the growing lithium battery industry. The Company’s  current focus is on the development of the CVS Lithium Brine Project and the adjoining Glory Lithium Clay Project in Clayton Valley, Nevada. Pure Energy also recently acquired a purchase option on a major new lithium brine project in the Lithium Triangle of South America, the Terra Cotta Project (“TCP”).  The TCP is located on Pocitos Salar in Salta, Argentina, where it enjoys some of the best infrastructure and access of any lithium brine exploration project in Argentina. Pure Energy has developed core strengths in innovative development and processing technologies for lithium brines and lithium mineral deposits.  Key attributes and activities include: On behalf of the Board of Directors, “Patrick Highsmith” Chief Executive Officer Forward Looking Statements: The information in this news release contains forward looking statements that are subject to a number of known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause actual results to differ materially from those anticipated in our forward looking statements. Factors that could cause such differences include: technical difficulties in connection with exploration and development activities, technological challenges with the extraction and processing of lithium brines, the speculative nature of mineral exploration, volatile microcap equity markets, changes in world commodity markets, equity markets, costs and supply of materials relevant to the mining industry, change in government and changes to regulations affecting the mining industry, including environmental requirements. Forward-looking statements in this release may include statements regarding mineral processing, estimates of reduced future capital and operating expenses, delivery of a preliminary economic assessment, future exploration programs, operation plans, geological interpretations, and mineral tenure issues. Although we believe the expectations reflected in our forward looking statements are reasonable, results may vary, and we cannot guarantee future results, levels of activity, performance or achievements. Neither TSX Venture Exchange nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in the policies of TSX Venture Exchange) accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release.

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