Water Research Foundation retired

Denver, CO, United States

Water Research Foundation retired

Denver, CO, United States
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Allen M.J.,Water Research Foundation retired | Edberg S.C.,Yale University | Clancy J.L.,St. Albans | Hrudey S.E.,University of Alberta
Critical Reviews in Microbiology | Year: 2015

Accounts of drinking water-borne disease outbreaks have always captured the interest of the public, elected and health officials, and the media. During the twentieth century, the drinking water community and public health organizations have endeavored to craft regulations and guidelines on treatment and management practices that reduce risks from drinking water, specifically human pathogens. During this period there also evolved misunderstandings as to potential health risk associated with microorganisms that may be present in drinking waters. These misunderstanding or "myths" have led to confusion among the many stakeholders. The purpose of this article is to provide a scientific- and clinically-based discussion of these "myths" and recommendations for better ensuring the microbial safety of drinking water and valid public health decisions. © 2015 Informa Healthcare USA, Inc.


Petti S.,University of Rome La Sapienza | Polimeni A.,University of Rome La Sapienza | Allen M.J.,Water Research Foundation retired
Annali di igiene : medicina preventiva e di comunità | Year: 2015

BACKGROUND: Dental unit water (DUW) could be contaminated by human pathogens coming from biological fluids penetrated during patient treatment and by opportunistic pathogens detached from aquatic biofilm. These microorganisms could be spread to following patients. We tested the disinfectant activity of hydrogen peroxide and monovalent silver ions (H(2)O(2)-Ag(+)) into DUW artificially contaminated with freshly isolated pathogens.METHODS: The tested microorganisms were Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Candida albicans, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Legionella pneumophila, Mycobacterium chelonae, non-pathogenic Bacillus clausii spores. Bacterial suspensions were inoculated into the waterlines of pre-sterilized dental turbines. The test-turbines were connected to DUW and contaminated water was treated for 10 minutes with H(2)O(2)-Ag(+)-based disinfectant (H(2)O(2) 3% v/v, Ag(+) 0.001% w/v). The control-turbines were left untreated. Turbines were washed with sterile hard water used to assess the residual bacterial loads (expressed in colony forming units -cfu). Each strain was tested five times and the mean log loads were assessed. Following the European Standardization Committee, the disinfectant activity was evaluated as mean log load reduction, that is, the difference between the mean log load detected on the control-turbines and the mean log load detected on the test-turbines.RESULTS: Mean bacterial loads detected on the control-turbines ranged between 105-107 cfu. The mean log load reductions resulted 7.5 log cfu for S. aureus, E. faecalis, P. aeruginosa, 6.3 for C. albicans, 5.4 for L. pneumophila, 5.3 for M. chelonae, 2.9 for B. clausii spores.CONCLUSIONS: DUW disinfection with H(2)O(2)-Ag(+) could help minimize the risk that planktonic pathogens are spread to patients during dental treatment.


PubMed | University of Rome La Sapienza and Water Research Foundation retired
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Annali di igiene : medicina preventiva e di comunita | Year: 2016

Dental unit water (DUW) could be contaminated by human pathogens coming from biological fluids penetrated during patient treatment and by opportunistic pathogens detached from aquatic biofilm. These microorganisms could be spread to following patients. We tested the disinfectant activity of hydrogen peroxide and monovalent silver ions (H(2)O(2)-Ag(+)) into DUW artificially contaminated with freshly isolated pathogens.The tested microorganisms were Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Candida albicans, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Legionella pneumophila, Mycobacterium chelonae, non-pathogenic Bacillus clausii spores. Bacterial suspensions were inoculated into the waterlines of pre-sterilized dental turbines. The test-turbines were connected to DUW and contaminated water was treated for 10 minutes with H(2)O(2)-Ag(+)-based disinfectant (H(2)O(2) 3% v/v, Ag(+) 0.001% w/v). The control-turbines were left untreated. Turbines were washed with sterile hard water used to assess the residual bacterial loads (expressed in colony forming units -cfu). Each strain was tested five times and the mean log loads were assessed. Following the European Standardization Committee, the disinfectant activity was evaluated as mean log load reduction, that is, the difference between the mean log load detected on the control-turbines and the mean log load detected on the test-turbines.Mean bacterial loads detected on the control-turbines ranged between 105-107 cfu. The mean log load reductions resulted 7.5 log cfu for S. aureus, E. faecalis, P. aeruginosa, 6.3 for C. albicans, 5.4 for L. pneumophila, 5.3 for M. chelonae, 2.9 for B. clausii spores.DUW disinfection with H(2)O(2)-Ag(+) could help minimize the risk that planktonic pathogens are spread to patients during dental treatment.


PubMed | Water Research Foundation retired
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Critical reviews in microbiology | Year: 2015

Accounts of drinking water-borne disease outbreaks have always captured the interest of the public, elected and health officials, and the media. During the twentieth century, the drinking water community and public health organizations have endeavored to craft regulations and guidelines on treatment and management practices that reduce risks from drinking water, specifically human pathogens. During this period there also evolved misunderstandings as to potential health risk associated with microorganisms that may be present in drinking waters. These misunderstanding or myths have led to confusion among the many stakeholders. The purpose of this article is to provide a scientific- and clinically-based discussion of these myths and recommendations for better ensuring the microbial safety of drinking water and valid public health decisions.

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