Topeka, KS, United States

Washburn University

www.washburn.edu
Topeka, KS, United States

Washburn University is a co-educational, public institution of higher learning in Topeka, Kansas, USA. It offers undergraduate and graduate programs, as well as professional programs in law and business. Washburn has 550 faculty members, who teach more than 6,100 undergraduate students and nearly 800 graduate students. The university's assets include a $152 million endowment. Wikipedia.

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News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

LearnHowToBecome.org, a leading resource provider for higher education and career information, has used released its list of the best colleges and universities in Kansas for 2017. Of the 23 four-year schools that made the list, Baker University, University of Kansas, Southwestern College, Kansas State University and Newman University scored as the top five. Of the 26 two-year schools that were also included, Dodge City Community College, Garden City Community College, Highland Community College, Hesston College and Neosho County Community College ranked the most highly. A full list of schools is included below. “Kansas’ unemployment rate has remained low over the past year, making it a stable place to begin a career,” said Wes Ricketts, senior vice president of LearnHowToBecome.org. “These Kansas schools have done an exceptional job preparing their students for the job market by providing a quality education and solid academic counseling and resources.” To be included on Kansas’ “Best Colleges” list, schools must be regionally accredited, not-for-profit institutions. Each college is also scored on data that includes career and academic resources, annual alumni earnings 10 years after entering college, availability of financial aid and such additional numbers as graduation rates and student/teacher ratios. Complete details on each college, their individual scores and the data and methodology used to determine the LearnHowToBecome.org “Best Colleges in Kansas” list, visit: Best Four-Year Colleges in Kansas for 2017 include: Baker University Benedictine College Bethany College Bethel College-North Newton Central Christian College of Kansas Emporia State University Fort Hays State University Friends University Kansas State University Kansas Wesleyan University McPherson College MidAmerica Nazarene University Newman University Ottawa University-Kansas City Ottawa University-Ottawa Pittsburg State University Southwestern College Sterling College Tabor College University of Kansas University of Saint Mary Washburn University Wichita State University Best Two-Year Colleges in Kansas for 2017 include: Allen County Community College Barton County Community College Butler Community College Cloud County Community College Coffeyville Community College Colby Community College Cowley County Community College Dodge City Community College Flint Hills Technical College Fort Scott Community College Garden City Community College Hesston College Highland Community College Hutchinson Community College Independence Community College Johnson County Community College Kansas City Kansas Community College Labette Community College Manhattan Area Technical College Neosho County Community College North Central Kansas Technical College Pratt Community College Salina Area Technical College Seward County Community College and Area Technical School Washburn Institute of Technology Wichita Area Technical College About Us: LearnHowtoBecome.org was founded in 2013 to provide data and expert driven information about employment opportunities and the education needed to land the perfect career. Our materials cover a wide range of professions, industries and degree programs, and are designed for people who want to choose, change or advance their careers. We also provide helpful resources and guides that address social issues, financial aid and other special interest in higher education. Information from LearnHowtoBecome.org has proudly been featured by more than 700 educational institutions.


Sumter, SC, May 19, 2017 --( Michaels is a lawyer who most recently served as general counsel and compliance director at Park Community Credit Union in Kentucky. At SAFE, she oversees information security, compliance, and loan review and focuses on mitigating regulatory and compliance risk. A graduate of the University of Nebraska and the Washburn University School of Law, Michaels began her decade-long career working at law firms in Kansas and Missouri. At those firms, she focused on lending, foreclosure, real estate, and other financial-related matters. She was with the Kentucky credit union for about four years prior to joining SAFE. “The significant growth that we have enjoyed at SAFE has created the need for the risk management expertise that Jennifer Michaels brings to this role,” said Darrell Merkel, president and CEO of SAFE Federal Credit Union. “There is a lot of complexity involved in lending and compliance, and she will help us successfully navigate the risks associated with that.” About SAFE Federal Credit Union SAFE Federal Credit Union, founded in 1955, is the largest credit union based in the Midlands of South Carolina, with $1 billion in total assets, 114,000 members, and 19 branches. Membership is open to anyone who lives, works, worships, or goes to school in Sumter, Lee, Clarendon, Florence, and Orangeburg counties, as well as parts of Kershaw, Richland, and Lexington counties. Membership is also open to employees of more than 500 companies located throughout the Midlands and relatives of those eligible to join. Connect with us at http://www.SAFEfed.org, on http://www.Facebook.com/SAFEfederalcreditunion or @SAFEFCU. Sumter, SC, May 19, 2017 --( PR.com )-- SAFE Federal Credit Union has named Jennifer Michaels its Vice President of risk management, a new position at the credit union.Michaels is a lawyer who most recently served as general counsel and compliance director at Park Community Credit Union in Kentucky. At SAFE, she oversees information security, compliance, and loan review and focuses on mitigating regulatory and compliance risk.A graduate of the University of Nebraska and the Washburn University School of Law, Michaels began her decade-long career working at law firms in Kansas and Missouri. At those firms, she focused on lending, foreclosure, real estate, and other financial-related matters. She was with the Kentucky credit union for about four years prior to joining SAFE.“The significant growth that we have enjoyed at SAFE has created the need for the risk management expertise that Jennifer Michaels brings to this role,” said Darrell Merkel, president and CEO of SAFE Federal Credit Union. “There is a lot of complexity involved in lending and compliance, and she will help us successfully navigate the risks associated with that.”About SAFE Federal Credit UnionSAFE Federal Credit Union, founded in 1955, is the largest credit union based in the Midlands of South Carolina, with $1 billion in total assets, 114,000 members, and 19 branches. Membership is open to anyone who lives, works, worships, or goes to school in Sumter, Lee, Clarendon, Florence, and Orangeburg counties, as well as parts of Kershaw, Richland, and Lexington counties. Membership is also open to employees of more than 500 companies located throughout the Midlands and relatives of those eligible to join. Connect with us at http://www.SAFEfed.org, on http://www.Facebook.com/SAFEfederalcreditunion or @SAFEFCU. Click here to view the list of recent Press Releases from SAFE Federal Credit Union


LAWRENCE -- In 2016, researchers published "slam dunk" evidence, based on iron-60 isotopes in ancient seabed, that supernovae buffeted the Earth -- one of them about 2.6 million years ago. University of Kansas researcher Adrian Melott, professor of physics and astronomy, supported those findings in Nature with an associated letter, titled "Supernovae in the neighborhood." Melott has followed up since those findings with an examination of the effects of the supernovae on Earth's biology. In new research to appear in Astrophysical Journal, the KU researcher and colleagues argue the estimated distance of the supernova thought to have occurred roughly 2.6 million years ago should be cut in half. "There's even more evidence of that supernova now," he said. "The timing estimates are still not exact, but the thing that changed to cause us to write this paper is the distance. We did this computation because other people did work that made a revised distance estimate, which cut the distance in half. But now, our distance estimate is more like 150 light years." A supernova exploding at such a range probably wouldn't touch off mass extinctions on Earth, Melott said. "People estimated the 'kill zone' for a supernova in a paper in 2003, and they came up with about 25 light years from Earth," he said. "Now we think maybe it's a bit greater than that. They left some effects out or didn't have good numbers, so now we think it may be a bit larger distance. We don't know precisely, and of course it wouldn't be a hard-cutoff distance. It would be a gradual change. But we think something more like 40 or 50 light years. So, an event at 150 light years should have some effects here but not set off a mass extinction." In addition to its distance, interstellar conditions at the time of a supernova would influence its lethality to biology on Earth. "Cosmic rays like to travel along magnetic field lines," Melott said. "They don't like to cut across magnetic field lines as they experience forces to stop them from doing that. If there's a magnetic field, we don't know its orientation, so it can either create a superhighway for cosmic ray, or it could block them. The main interesting case did not assume the superhighway. It assumed that much of the magnetic field was blasted out by a series of supernovae, which made the Local Bubble -- and we and the most recent supernovae were inside. This is a weak, disordered magnetic field. The best analogy I can think of is more like off-road driving." In such a case, the authors think cosmic rays from the supernova at 150 light years would have penetrated to Earth's lower atmosphere. "This is a much stronger thing," he said. "The cosmic rays from the supernova would be getting down into the lower atmosphere -- having an effect on the troposphere. All kinds of elementary particles are penetrating from altitudes of 45-10 miles, and many muons get to the ground. The effect of the muons is greater -- it's not overwhelming, but imagine every organism on Earth gets the equivalent of several CT scans per year. CT scans have some danger associated with them. Your doctor wouldn't recommend a CT scan unless you really needed it." Melott said cancer and mutations would be the most obvious consequences for Earth's biology of a supernova's cosmic rays. With his co-authors -- B.C. Thomas of Washburn University (2005 KU physics doctoral graduate and recent winner of the A. Roy Myers Excellence in Research Award), M. Kachelrieß of Institutt for fysikk in Norway, D.V. Semikoz of the Observatoire de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cite in France and the National Research Nuclear University in Moscow, and A.C. Overholt (2013 KU physics doctoral graduate) of MidAmerica Nazarene University -- Melott looked at the fossil record in Africa, the most geographically stable continent on earth during the Pleistocene, when a supernova was likely to have occurred. "There isn't a mass extinction, but there is kind of a lot of extinction going on at that time and species turnover," he said. "It's not quite severe enough to call it a mass extinction. There is some effect possibly connected to the supernova. That's more difficult to say because there are many competing effects. Even in Africa you have climate change, and you don't know if climate change is causing the effects you see or if a supernova has something to do with the climate change." In addition to cosmic rays, the team found a supernova would have caused blue light to shine in the sky at night for about a month. "That's been shown to be a fairly bad thing for almost all living organisms," Melott said. "It throws off sleep and messes up your melatonin production. I would never want a blue LED alarm clock in my bedroom, for example. Blue LED streetlights have been shown to have bad effects in animals, causing behavioral changes. But this effect would only last a month or so. I think you would never see evidence in the fossil record." Atmospheric ionization would have been a more serious effect from a supernova, according to the KU researcher. "Atmospheric ionization can help lightning get started," Melott said. "When a cosmic ray comes down, it makes a path through the atmosphere, where it knocks electrons out of atoms, and that makes a pathway for lightning to get started. We'd expect to see a big increase with cloud-to-ground lightning. That would be good for some organisms and bad for others. Lightning is the number one cause of wildfires other than humans. So, we'd expect a whole lot more wildfires, and that could change the ecology of different regions, such as a loss of tree cover in northeast Africa, which could even have something to do with human evolution. The Great Plains has recently been largely kept grass-covered by a bunch of wildfires. A big increase in lightning would also mean a big increase in nitrate coming out of the rain, and that would act like fertilizer." Indeed, Melott said 2.6 million years ago there was in Africa a loss of tree cover and increase in grassland, possibly attributable to lightning-driven wildfires. "We think it's possible that the cosmic rays may have had something to do with that," he said. Melott added he's often asked by people if they should fear a supernova exploding close to Earth today. "I tell them they should worry about global warming and nuclear war, not this stuff," he said. "There's nothing close enough to cause this kind of event in the very near future." The closest potential supernova is Betelgeuse, about 600 light years away, according to Melott. "It's much further away than this one we've been talking about," he said. "It's close enough to be spectacular in the sense that it would be bright and you'd see it in daytime, but there'd be no harmful effects."


News Article | May 12, 2017
Site: astrobiology.com

In 2016, researchers published "slam dunk" evidence, based on iron-60 isotopes in ancient seabed, that supernovae buffeted the Earth One of these supernovae was about 2.6 million years ago. University of Kansas researcher Adrian Melott, professor of physics and astronomy, supported those findings in Nature with an associated letter, titled "Supernovae in the Neighborhood" [http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v532/n7597/full/532040a.html]. Melott has followed up since those findings with an examination of the effects of the supernovae on Earth's biology. In new research to appear in Astrophysical Journal, the KU researcher and colleagues argue the estimated distance of the supernova thought to have occurred roughly 2.6 million years ago should be cut in half. "There's even more evidence of that supernova now," he said. "The timing estimates are still not exact, but the thing that changed to cause us to write this paper is the distance. We did this computation because other people did work that made a revised distance estimate, which cut the distance in half. But now, our distance estimate is more like 150 light-years." A supernova exploding at such a range probably wouldn't touch off mass extinctions on Earth, Melott said. "People estimated the 'kill zone' for a supernova in a paper in 2003, and they came up with about 25 light-years from Earth," he said. "Now we think maybe it's a bit greater than that. They left some effects out or didn't have good numbers, so now we think it may be a bit larger distance. We don't know precisely, and of course it wouldn't be a hard-cutoff distance. It would be a gradual change. But we think something more like 40 or 50 light-years. So, an event at 150 light-years should have some effects here but not set off a mass extinction." In addition to its distance, interstellar conditions at the time of a supernova would influence its lethality to biology on Earth. "Cosmic rays like to travel along magnetic field lines," Melott said. "They don't like to cut across magnetic field lines as they experience forces to stop them from doing that. If there's a magnetic field, we don't know its orientation, so it can either create a superhighway for cosmic ray, or it could block them. The main interesting case did not assume the superhighway. It assumed that much of the magnetic field was blasted out by a series of supernovae, which made the Local Bubble -- and we and the most recent supernovae were inside. This is a weak, disordered magnetic field. The best analogy I can think of is more like off-road driving." In such a case, the authors think cosmic rays from the supernova at 150 light-years would have penetrated to Earth's lower atmosphere. "This is a much stronger thing," he said. "The cosmic rays from the supernova would be getting down into the lower atmosphere -- having an effect on the troposphere. All kinds of elementary particles are penetrating from altitudes of 45-10 miles, and many muons get to the ground. The effect of the muons is greater -- it's not overwhelming, but imagine every organism on Earth gets the equivalent of several CT scans per year. CT scans have some danger associated with them. Your doctor wouldn't recommend a CT scan unless you really needed it." Melott said cancer and mutations would be the most obvious consequences for Earth's biology of a supernova's cosmic rays. With his co-authors -- B.C. Thomas of Washburn University (2005 KU physics doctoral graduate and recent winner of the A. Roy Myers Excellence in Research Award), M. Kachelrieß of Institutt for fysikk in Norway, D.V. Semikoz of the Observatoire de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cite in France and the National Research Nuclear University in Moscow, and A.C. Overholt (2013 KU physics doctoral graduate) of MidAmerica Nazarene University -- Melott looked at the fossil record in Africa, the most geographically stable continent on Earth during the Pleistocene, when a supernova was likely to have occurred. "There isn't a mass extinction, but there is kind of a lot of extinction going on at that time and species turnover," he said. "It's not quite severe enough to call it a mass extinction. There is some effect possibly connected to the supernova. That's more difficult to say because there are many competing effects. Even in Africa you have climate change, and you don't know if climate change is causing the effects you see or if a supernova has something to do with the climate change." In addition to cosmic rays, the team found a supernova would have caused blue light to shine in the sky at night for about a month. "That's been shown to be a fairly bad thing for almost all living organisms," Melott said. "It throws off sleep and messes up your melatonin production. I would never want a blue LED alarm clock in my bedroom, for example. Blue LED streetlights have been shown to have bad effects in animals, causing behavioral changes. But this effect would only last a month or so. I think you would never see evidence in the fossil record." Atmospheric ionization would have been a more serious effect from a supernova, according to the KU researcher. "Atmospheric ionization can help lightning get started," Melott said. "When a cosmic ray comes down, it makes a path through the atmosphere, where it knocks electrons out of atoms, and that makes a pathway for lightning to get started. We'd expect to see a big increase with cloud-to-ground lightning. That would be good for some organisms and bad for others. Lightning is the number one cause of wildfires other than humans. So, we'd expect a whole lot more wildfires, and that could change the ecology of different regions, such as a loss of tree cover in northeast Africa, which could even have something to do with human evolution. The Great Plains has recently been largely kept grass-covered by a bunch of wildfires. A big increase in lightning would also mean a big increase in nitrate coming out of the rain, and that would act like fertilizer." Indeed, Melott said 2.6 million years ago there was in Africa a loss of tree cover and increase in grassland, possibly attributable to lightning-driven wildfires. "We think it's possible that the cosmic rays may have had something to do with that," he said. Melott added he's often asked by people if they should fear a supernova exploding close to Earth today. "I tell them they should worry about global warming and nuclear war, not this stuff," he said. "There's nothing close enough to cause this kind of event in the very near future." The closest potential supernova is Betelgeuse, about 600 light-years away, according to Melott. "It's much further away than this one we've been talking about," he said. "It's close enough to be spectacular in the sense that it would be bright and you'd see it in daytime, but there'd be no harmful effects." Reference: "A Supernova at 50 pc: Effects on the Earth's Atmosphere and Biota," A. L. Melott et al., 2017, to appear in the Astrophysical Journal [http://apj.aas.org, preprint: https://arxiv.org/abs/1702.04365].


Melott has followed up since those findings with an examination of the effects of the supernovae on Earth's biology. In new research to appear in Astrophysical Journal, the KU researcher and colleagues argue the estimated distance of the supernova thought to have occurred roughly 2.6 million years ago should be cut in half. "There's even more evidence of that supernova now," he said. "The timing estimates are still not exact, but the thing that changed to cause us to write this paper is the distance. We did this computation because other people did work that made a revised distance estimate, which cut the distance in half. But now, our distance estimate is more like 150 light years." A supernova exploding at such a range probably wouldn't touch off mass extinctions on Earth, Melott said. "People estimated the 'kill zone' for a supernova in a paper in 2003, and they came up with about 25 light years from Earth," he said. "Now we think maybe it's a bit greater than that. They left some effects out or didn't have good numbers, so now we think it may be a bit larger distance. We don't know precisely, and of course it wouldn't be a hard-cutoff distance. It would be a gradual change. But we think something more like 40 or 50 light years. So, an event at 150 light years should have some effects here but not set off a mass extinction." In addition to its distance, interstellar conditions at the time of a supernova would influence its lethality to biology on Earth. "Cosmic rays like to travel along magnetic field lines," Melott said. "They don't like to cut across magnetic field lines as they experience forces to stop them from doing that. If there's a magnetic field, we don't know its orientation, so it can either create a superhighway for cosmic ray, or it could block them. The main interesting case did not assume the superhighway. It assumed that much of the magnetic field was blasted out by a series of supernovae, which made the Local Bubble—and we and the most recent supernovae were inside. This is a weak, disordered magnetic field. The best analogy I can think of is more like off-road driving." In such a case, the authors think cosmic rays from the supernova at 150 light years would have penetrated to Earth's lower atmosphere. "This is a much stronger thing," he said. "The cosmic rays from the supernova would be getting down into the lower atmosphere—having an effect on the troposphere. All kinds of elementary particles are penetrating from altitudes of 45-10 miles, and many muons get to the ground. The effect of the muons is greater—it's not overwhelming, but imagine every organism on Earth gets the equivalent of several CT scans per year. CT scans have some danger associated with them. Your doctor wouldn't recommend a CT scan unless you really needed it." Melott said cancer and mutations would be the most obvious consequences for Earth's biology of a supernova's cosmic rays. With his co-authors— B.C. Thomas of Washburn University (2005 KU physics doctoral graduate and recent winner of the A. Roy Myers Excellence in Research Award), M. Kachelrieß of Institutt for fysikk in Norway, D.V. Semikoz of the Observatoire de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cite in France and the National Research Nuclear University in Moscow, and A.C. Overholt (2013 KU physics doctoral graduate) of MidAmerica Nazarene University—Melott looked at the fossil record in Africa, the most geographically stable continent on earth during the Pleistocene, when a supernova was likely to have occurred. "There isn't a mass extinction, but there is kind of a lot of extinction going on at that time and species turnover," he said. "It's not quite severe enough to call it a mass extinction. There is some effect possibly connected to the supernova. That's more difficult to say because there are many competing effects. Even in Africa you have climate change, and you don't know if climate change is causing the effects you see or if a supernova has something to do with the climate change." In addition to cosmic rays, the team found a supernova would have caused blue light to shine in the sky at night for about a month. "That's been shown to be a fairly bad thing for almost all living organisms," Melott said. "It throws off sleep and messes up your melatonin production. I would never want a blue LED alarm clock in my bedroom, for example. Blue LED streetlights have been shown to have bad effects in animals, causing behavioral changes. But this effect would only last a month or so. I think you would never see evidence in the fossil record." Atmospheric ionization would have been a more serious effect from a supernova, according to the KU researcher. "Atmospheric ionization can help lightning get started," Melott said. "When a cosmic ray comes down, it makes a path through the atmosphere, where it knocks electrons out of atoms, and that makes a pathway for lightning to get started. We'd expect to see a big increase with cloud-to-ground lightning. That would be good for some organisms and bad for others. Lightning is the number one cause of wildfires other than humans. So, we'd expect a whole lot more wildfires, and that could change the ecology of different regions, such as a loss of tree cover in northeast Africa, which could even have something to do with human evolution. The Great Plains has recently been largely kept grass-covered by a bunch of wildfires. A big increase in lightning would also mean a big increase in nitrate coming out of the rain, and that would act like fertilizer." Indeed, Melott said 2.6 million years ago there was in Africa a loss of tree cover and increase in grassland, possibly attributable to lightning-driven wildfires. "We think it's possible that the cosmic rays may have had something to do with that," he said. Melott added he's often asked by people if they should fear a supernova exploding close to Earth today. "I tell them they should worry about global warming and nuclear war, not this stuff," he said. "There's nothing close enough to cause this kind of event in the very near future." The closest potential supernova is Betelgeuse, about 600 light years away, according to Melott. "It's much further away than this one we've been talking about," he said. "It's close enough to be spectacular in the sense that it would be bright and you'd see it in daytime, but there'd be no harmful effects." Explore further: Ancient supernovae buffeted Earth's biology with radiation dose, researcher says More information: "A Supernova at 50 pc: Effects on the Earth's Atmosphere and Biota," A. L. Melott et al., 2017, to appear in the Astrophysical Journal: arxiv.org/abs/1702.04365


News Article | November 27, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Colleges with the Best Online Social Work Degree Programs are being honored in a new ranking released by leading higher education information and resource provider AffordableCollegesOnline.org. The 2016-2017 list pinpoints 43 schools with social work degree programs online that offer the best overall combination of quality and value for students. Schools at the top of the list include the University of Alaska Fairbanks, University of Alabama, Goodwin College, Northern Arizona University, Washburn University and Washington State University. "Aspiring social work students have more options than ever when it comes to finding the right school,” said Dan Schuessler, CEO and Founder of AffordableCollegesOnline.org. “These colleges are offering students added flexibility by taking their social work programs online, and are the best in the nation when it comes to affordability, quality and overall student success.” To qualify for a spot on the AffordableCollegesOnline.org ranking, schools must meet several specific baseline quality standards. All schools chosen are accredited, public or private not-for-profit institutions, and each must offer in-state tuition at or below $25,000 or less annually to qualify. All eligible colleges are scored based on more than a dozen unique data points and statistics, including financial aid offerings and graduation rates. Each school’s ranking is determined based on their final school-specific score. All schools recognized on the 2016-2017 Best Online Social Work Degrees ranking can be found listed alphabetically below. Full details on school scores and the data and methodology used to rank colleges are available at: The Best Colleges to earn an Online Social Work Degree for 2016-2017: Amridge University Bemidji State University Brandman University Brescia University Brigham Young University - Idaho California State University - East Bay Colorado State University - Fort Collins Goodwin College Hannibal-LaGrange University Indiana Wesleyan University Mayville State University Mercy College Metropolitan State University of Denver Mid-Atlantic Christian University Missouri State University - Springfield North Dakota State University - Main Campus Northern Arizona University Oregon State University Pennsylvania State University - Main Campus Pennsylvania State University - Altoona Pennsylvania State University - Brandywine Pennsylvania State University - Shenango Pennsylvania State University - Worthington Scranton Pennsylvania State University - York Prairie View A & M University Presentation College Salisbury University Spring Arbor University The University of Alabama The University of Texas of the Permian Basin Thomas University Union Institute & University University of Alaska Fairbanks University of Arizona University of North Alabama University of Utah University of Wisconsin - Stout Utah State University Viterbo University Washburn University Washington State University Wayne State University Western New Mexico University AffordableCollegesOnline.org began in 2011 to provide quality data and information about pursuing an affordable higher education. Our free community resource materials and tools span topics such as financial aid and college savings, opportunities for veterans and people with disabilities, and online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning environments that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational and career success. We have been featured by nearly 1,100 postsecondary institutions and nearly 120 government organizations.


News Article | November 30, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

University Business magazine and CASHNet, a leading technology company that provides secure transaction systems to colleges and universities nationwide, are honoring eight colleges and universities in the Winter 2016 round of the “Models of Excellence” program. Sponsored by CASHNet, the Models of Excellence program recognizes innovative approaches to encouraging and nurturing student success on campus. “The Winter 2016 Models of Excellence honorees recognize the more nuanced obstacles students face on campus, and ways schools are eliminating them with innovative solutions,” says JD Solomon, editorial director of University Business. “These colleges and universities demonstrate how higher ed institutions can shift strategies and departments to better complement students’ needs, as well as their efforts.” The Winter 2016 honorees are: SUNY Geneseo (Geneseo, N.Y.); University of Pittsburgh (Pittsburgh, PA.); Moravian College (Bethlehem, Pa.); Seton Hill University (Greensburg, Pa.); Bossier Parish Community College (Bossier City, La.); Northwood University (Midland, Mich.); Washburn University (Topeka, Kan.); and Westchester Community College (Valhalla, N.Y.). For full descriptions of the Winter 2016 honorees’ efforts, or to apply to be recognized as a Model of Excellence, visit http://www.universitybusiness.com/mox. “The Winter 2016 MoX institutions are utilizing their entire networks (including students, faculty, staff and alumni) to increase success on campus,” says Edward Worrilow, head of marketing and communications at CASHNet. “We are proud to recognize their efforts alongside University Business.” About University Business University Business is the leading publication for senior managers at colleges and universities throughout the United States, reaching 80,000 leaders who manage offices such as enrollment, technology, business, finance, facilities and academic affairs. Website: http://www.universitybusiness.com. About CASHNet CASHNet is a leading payment technology provider of secure transaction services to over 700 campuses in higher education, reaching millions of students nationwide. Whether it’s to simplify electronic billing, accept payments all over campus, offer flexible tuition payment plans, or create online storefronts, CASHNet fits everyday campus needs. As a leader in the industry for over 25 years, CASHNet has constantly evolved to create the secure and simplified experience students, payers, and administrators require. More information can be found at http://www.cashnet.com.


News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Community for Accredited Online Schools, a leading resource provider for higher education information, has highlighted Kansas’ best colleges and universities with online programs for 2017. A total of 33 schools were recognized for providing top-quality online learning programs. Of the 18 four-year schools that were ranked, University of Kansas, Kansas State University, Baker University, Southwestern University and Wichita State University came in as the top five institutions. Kansas’ top 15 two-year schools were also included, with Dodge City Community College, Barton County Community College, Hutchinson Community College, Johnson County Community College and Kansas City Kansas Community College taking the lead. “Students across the nation are increasingly interested in pursuing an online education, and Kansas is no exception,” said Doug Jones, CEO and founder of AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org. “The schools on our list have proven to offer high quality education options online for students who want a more flexible, accessible certificate or degree program.” To earn a spot on Kansas’ “Best Online Schools” list, these colleges and universities must be public or private not-for-profit entities that are institutionally accredited. Each college is also rated based data points that include graduation rates, student/teacher ratios, student services and financial aid availability. For more details on where each school falls in the rankings and the data and methodology used to determine the lists, visit: The Best Online Four-Year Schools in Kansas for 2017 include the following: Baker University Barclay College Central Christian College of Kansas Emporia State University Fort Hays State University Friends University Kansas State University MidAmerica Nazarene University Newman University Ottawa University Pittsburg State University Southwestern College Sterling College Tabor College University of Kansas University of Saint Mary Washburn University Wichita State University Kansas’ Best Online Two-Year Schools for 2017 include the following: Allen County Community College Barton County Community College Cloud County Community College Coffeyville Community College Colby Community College Cowley County Community College Dodge City Community College Flint Hills Technical College Hutchinson Community College Johnson County Community College Kansas City Kansas Community College Labette Community College Pratt Community College Seward County Community College and Area Technical School Wichita Area Technical College ### About Us: AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org was founded in 2011 to provide students and parents with quality data and information about pursuing an affordable, quality education that has been certified by an accrediting agency. Our community resource materials and tools span topics such as college accreditation, financial aid, opportunities available to veterans, people with disabilities, as well as online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning programs that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational success.


News Article | March 2, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Denver Court Reporting is proud to announce their partnership with Spark Digital Marketing to expand court reporting services across Colorado. Midwest Reporters has already earned a reputation as a leading provider of court reporters in Colorado, Kansas, and Nebraska. Denver Court Reporting is a subsidiary of Midwest Reporters, Inc. which was originally established in 2000. Since then, they have build a staff of specialists including video and audio technicians and certified legal videographers. Their goal is to provide comprehensive assistance for all court and deposition-related tasks for attorneys. The company makes a firm commitment to make the scheduling and travel process as easy as possible so that attorneys and legal teams can focus on their most important tasks. Midwest Reporters was founded by Dana L. Burkdoll, CSR, RPR, CCR. She graduated from Washburn University in Topeka, KS with a degree in Court and Conference Reporting. She got her start in the field as a CART provider and closed captioner. She is a state-certified court reporter in Kansas, Iowa, Missouri, Georgia, and Oklahoma in addition to being nationally certified Registered Professional Reporter. The company maintains seven offices throughout the region for the convenience of their clients, ready to provide court reporting or legal videography services whenever they are needed. Dana L. Burkdoll founded the company to make it easy for busy attorneys to schedule depositions seamlessly and have access to experienced and dedicated court reporters for hearings or depositions. They provide a broad range of services designed to accomplish that goal, including rough drafts, expedited service, stenographic court reporting services, PDF transcripts, document management, exhibit scanning, realtime court reporting, and realtime internet streaming. In addition, the company offers legal videography and and litigation support. Denver Court Reporting is looking forward to an even bigger impact across Colorado by providing attorneys with access to experienced and dedicated court reporters. To learn more about the services offered by Denver Court Reporting, please visit https://midwestreporters.net/ Spark Digital Marketing offers a broad range of services out of North Carolina in the realm the online marketing. These include social media management, search engine optimization, website development, content marketing, and inbound marketing management. Spark Digital Marketing primarily works with court reporters to help them earn more deposition business from out-of-town attorneys. Spark Digital Marketing is owned and operated by Tony Wright. Tony Wright brings more than a decade of court reporting and digital marketing experience to Spark. To learn more about the services offered by Denver Court Reporting, please visit denverreporting.net.


Background: The cost of the implant as part of a total knee arthroplasty accounts for a substantial portion of the costs for the overall procedure: all-polyethylene tibial components cost considerably less than cemented metal-backed tibial components. We performed a systematic review of the literature to determine whether the clinical results of lower-cost all-polyethylene tibial components were comparable with the results of a more expensive metal-backed tibial component. Methods: We searched The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, EBSCO CINAHL, the bibliographies of identified articles, orthopaedic meeting abstracts, health technology assessment web sites, and important orthopaedic journals. This search was performed for the years 1990 to the present. No language restriction was applied. We restricted our search to Level-I studies involving participants who received either an all-polyethylene or a metal-backed tibial implant. The primary outcome measures were durability, function, and adverse events. Two reviewers independently screened the papers for inclusion, assessed trial quality, and extracted data. Effects estimates were pooled with use of fixed and random-effects models of risk ratios, calculated with 95% confidence intervals. Heterogeneity was assessed with the I2 statistic. Forest plots were also generated. Results: Data on 1798 primary total knee implants from twelve studies were analyzed. In all studies, the median or mean age of the participants was greater than sixty-seven years, with a majority of the patients being female. There was no difference between patients managed with an all-polyethylene tibial component and those managed with a metal-backed tibial component in terms of adverse events. There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of the durability of the implants at two, ten, and fifteen years postoperatively, regardless of the year or how durability was defined (revision or radiographic failure). Finally, with use of a variety of validated measures, there was no difference between the two groups in terms of functional status at two, eight, and ten years, regardless of the measure used. Conclusion: A less expensive all-polyethylene component as part of a total knee arthroplasty has results equivalent to those obtained with a cemented metal-backed tibial component. Using a total knee implant with a cemented allpolyethylene tibial component could save the healthcare system substantial money while obtaining equivalent results to more expensive cemented designs and materials. Level of Evidence: Therapeutic Level I. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. Copyright © 2011 by the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery Incorporated.

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