Tokyo, Japan
Tokyo, Japan

Waseda University , abbreviated as Sōdai , is a private university mainly located in Shinjuku, Tokyo, Japan. As the second private university to be founded in Japan, Waseda University is considered to be one of Japan's most prestigious universities, consistently ranking amongst the top universities in Japanese university rankings. The university has many notable alumni in Japan, with seven Prime Ministers of Japan and many CEOs, including Tadashi Yanai, the CEO of UNIQLO.Established in 1882 as the Tōkyō Senmon Gakkō or Tōkyō College by Ōkuma Shigenobu, the school was renamed Waseda University in 1902 after the founder's hometown village. The university consists of 13 undergraduate schools and 23 graduate schools, and is one of the 13 universities in the Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology's "Global 30" Project.The university holds a memorandum of agreement with Cambridge University, the University of Hong Kong, and Yale University among its 432 partnership institutions in 79 countries. Wikipedia.

SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Patent
MItsubishi Electric and Waseda University | Date: 2017-01-04

A measurement apparatus (100) comprising a three-dimensional point cloud model memory unit (199) for storing a three-dimensional point cloud model including a point cloud each showing a three-dimensional position; an image displaying unit (341) for displaying an image captured by a camera on a displaying device (901) and prompting a user to specify a position within the image; a measurement image point obtaining unit (342) for inputting the position within the image specified by the user as a measurement image point from an inputting device; a vector calculating unit (140) for calculating a vector showing direction from a center of the camera to the measurement image point inputted by the measurement image point obtaining unit (342); a neighborhood extracting unit (171) for extracting one neighboring point of the measurement image point from the point cloud of the three-dimensional point cloud model; a neighboring plane calculating unit (173) for calculating a particular plane including the one neighboring point extracted by the neighborhood extracting unit (171); and a feature position calculating unit (174) for calculating an intersecting point of the particular plane calculated by the neighboring plane calculating unit (173) and the vector calculated by the vector calculating unit (140) as a three-dimensional position of the measurement image point.


News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

La Jolla, Calif., May 8, 2017 - An international collaborative study led by researchers at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP), with major participation from Yokohama School of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and UC San Diego, has identified the molecular mechanism behind lithium's effectiveness in treating bipolar disorder patients. The study, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), utilized human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPS cells) to map lithium's response pathway, enabling the larger pathogenesis of bipolar disorder to be identified. These results are the first to explain the molecular basis of the disease, and may support the development of a diagnostic test for the disorder as well as predict the likelihood of patient response to lithium treatment. It may also provide the basis to discover new drugs that are safer and more effective than lithium. Bipolar disorder is a mental health condition causing extreme mood swings that include emotional highs (mania or hypomania) and lows (depression) and affects approximately 5.7 million adults in the U.S. Lithium is the first treatment explored after bipolar symptoms, but it has significant limitations. Only approximately one-third of patients respond to lithium treatment, and its effect is only found through a trial-and-error process that takes months--and sometimes years--of prescribing the drug and monitoring for response. Side effects of lithium treatment can be significant, including nausea, muscle tremors, emotional numbing, irregular heartbeat, weight gain, and birth defects, and many patients choose to stop taking the medicine as a result. "Lithium has been used to treat bipolar disorder for generations, but up until now our lack of knowledge about why the therapy does or does not work for a particular patient led to unnecessary dosing and delayed finding an effective treatment. Further, its side effects are intolerable for many patients, limiting its use and creating an urgent need for more targeted drugs with minimal risks," said Evan Snyder, M.D., Ph.D., professor and director of the Center for Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine at SBP, and senior author of the study. "Importantly, our findings open a clear path to finding safe and effective new drugs. Equally as important, it helped give us insight into what type of mechanisms cause psychiatric problems such as these." "We realized that studying the lithium response could be used as a 'molecular can-opener' to unravel the molecular pathway of this complex disorder, that turns out not to be caused by a defect in a gene, but rather by the posttranslational regulation (phosphorylation) of the product of a gene--in this case, CRMP2, an intracellular protein that regulates neural networks," added Snyder. In hiPS cells created from lithium-responsive and non-responsive patients, researchers observed a physiological difference in the regulation of CRMP2, which rendered the protein to be in a much more inactive state in responsive patients. However, the research showed that when lithium was administered to these cells, their regulatory mechanisms were corrected, restoring normal activity of CRMP2 and correcting the underlying cause of their disorder. Thus, the study demonstrated that bipolar disorder can be rooted in physiological--not necessarily genetic--mechanisms. The insights derived from the hiPS cells were validated in actual brain specimens from patients with bipolar disorder (on and off lithium), in animal models, and in the actions of living neurons. "This 'molecular can-opener' approach--using a drug known to have a useful action without exactly knowing why--allowed us to examine and understand an underlying pathogenesis of bipolar disorder," said Snyder. "The approach may be extended to additional complex disorders and diseases for which we don't understand the underlying biology but do have drugs that may have some beneficial actions, such as depression, anxiety, schizophrenia and others in need of more effective therapies. One cannot improve a therapy until one knows what molecularly really needs to be fixed." This study was performed in collaboration with Veterans Administration Medical Center in La Jolla, University of California San Diego, Yokohama City University, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Mailman Research Center at McLean Hospital, University of Connecticut School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, National Institute of Mental Health, Vala Sciences, Inc., Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard University, Dalhousie University, Beth-Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Örebro University, Janssen Research & Development Labs, Waseda University, and RIKEN . Funding was provided by the National Institutes of Health (grants RC2MH090011, R21MH093958, R33MH087896 and R01MH095088 and the Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures Program), the Viterbi Foundation Neuroscience Initiative, the Stanley Medical Research Institute, the Tau Consortium, the California Institute of Regenerative Medicine, the California Bipolar Foundation and the International Bipolar Foundation. Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) is an independent nonprofit medical research organization that conducts world-class, collaborative, biological research and translates its discoveries for the benefit of patients. SBP focuses its research on cancer, immunity, neurodegeneration, metabolic disorders and rare children's diseases. The Institute invests in talent, technology and partnerships to accelerate the translation of laboratory discoveries that will have the greatest impact on patients. Recognized for its world-class NCI-designated Cancer Center and the Conrad Prebys Center for Chemical Genomics, SBP employs about 1,100 scientists and staff in San Diego (La Jolla), Calif., and Orlando (Lake Nona), Fla. For more information, visit us at SBPdiscovery.org or on Facebook at facebook.com/SBPdiscovery and on Twitter @SBPdiscovery.


Patent
Mitsubishi Group and Waseda University | Date: 2016-10-11

A mobile robot 1 having a plurality of kinds of moving forms includes a body unit 11 having a front face and a back face, four limb units 12 having a plurality of limb-side drive shafts, and front end tools 13 provided on a front end side of the limb units 12. A base end side of the limb unit 12 is connected to the body unit 11. The four limb units 12 are the same units. The body unit 11 and the four limb units 12 are movable by switching a front face side and a back face side so that a moving operation of the front face side and a moving operation of the back face side are symmetrical across the center of a thickness direction of the body unit 11.


Patent
Waseda University and Nissan Chemical Industries Ltd. | Date: 2016-03-09

A ion-conductive fused-ring quinone polymer includes recurring units of formula (1) and/or (2) below wherein each X is independently a single bond or a divalent group, and A^(1 )and A^(2 )are each independently an aromatic hydrocarbon ring or an oxygen atom or sulfur atom-containing aromatic heterocycle that forms together with two carbon atoms on a benzoquinone skeleton. This polymer is a material having charge-storing properties which, when used as an electrode active material, is capable of providing a high-performance battery possessing high capacity, high rate characteristics and high cycle characteristics.


Patent
Waseda University and Nissan Chemical Industries Ltd. | Date: 2016-03-09

Materials having charge-storing properties and made variously of dipyridine-fused benzoquinones of formula (1) below or derivatives thereof, dipyridine-fused benzoquinones of formula (4) below or derivatives thereof, or dipyridine-fused benzoquinone skeleton-containing polymers are provided. In the formulas, Ar^(1 )and Ar^(2 )are each independently a pyridine ring that forms together with two carbon atoms on a benzoquinone skeleton, or a derivative thereof. When used as electrode active materials, these charge storage materials are capable of providing high-performance batteries possessing a high capacity, high rate characteristics and high cycle characteristics.


News Article | May 25, 2017
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

As represented by conventional radiograph, radiological images provide only black and white figures in 2D space. The situation is basically the same for Single photon emission tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET), which are the two most common molecular imaging techniques used in nuclear medicine. PET is used especially for early cancer and Alzheimer's disease detection, but radioactive tracers suitable for each detector are limited in terms of energy. For example, PET can only image monochromatic gamma rays thus provide black and white 2D images. Moreover, production of PET tracers, usually made by a cyclotron facility in medical centers, is inevitably costly. "All of these problems could be addressed if gamma rays of arbitrary energy could be easily visualized in 3D space," points out Jun Kataoka, professor of applied physics at Waseda University. "This would be as revolutionary as black and white television turning into color, dramatically increasing the amount of information we could obtain from an image." Thus, Professor Kataoka's research group invented a medical gamma-ray detector (Compton camera) and succeeded in high-resolution, multicolor 3D molecular imaging of a live mouse which was administered with three different radioactive tracers. They discovered that the tracers iodine, strontium, and zinc accumulated in the thyroid, bones and liver respectively, confirming that these new tracers concentrated in each target organ. What's more, this camera only weighs 580g and fits in the palm of a hand, making it the world's most compact Compton camera. "The measurement time took 10 minutes per angle, so we were able to obtain an image taken from 12 angles in just 2 hours. The time could be reduced even more by using multiple Compton cameras. For example, if there are 12 Compton cameras surrounding an object, the same image as this study could be obtained in just 10 minutes, suggesting a new way to understand biodynamics by looking at how a drug is taken into the body in 10-minute increments." This research was published in Scientific Reports. Although SPECT and PET are widely used, the radioactive tracers suitable for each detector have been limited. SPECT only images low-energy gamma rays less than 400 kilo-electron volts (keV), and PET can image only positron emitting sources of 511keV. Thus, the use of a Compton camera, which can image energy from a few hundred keV to more than mega-electron volts (MeV), was eagerly awaited for, along with development of new potential tracers. Professor Kataoka's research group developed the world's lightest, medical Compton camera with high detection efficiency and practical spatial resolution, enabling flexible measurements. The camera was then rotated around the mouse from 12 angles, which was administered with three different radioactive tracers: iodine (131I, 364 keV), strontium (85Sr, 514 keV), and zinc (65Zn, 1116 keV). The measurement time totaled 2 hours, and the group successfully demonstrated the effectiveness of simultaneous in vivo imaging of multiple tracers and imaged the gamma rays nearly real-time with a resolution of 3mm, equivalent to PET. Based on this study, Professor Kataoka is now working towards developing a gamma-ray camera which works like the human eye. "The human eye can instantly distinguish the colors and brightness of light from all directions, as well as determine the object's shape in 3D from the displacement between the left and right eye. Therefore, stereoscopic imaging becomes theoretically feasible by using multiple ultra-compact Compton cameras." Though not limited to the medical field, this technology could help track behaviors of cancer cells and minerals in the body by combining the conventional PET drugs with newly found tracers, calculate the survival rate of a transplanted organ, develop cheaper and more convenient drugs for medical imaging, and monitor online the effectiveness of particle therapy by measuring various prompt gamma rays emitted during treatment. "As radiation technology is still emerging, we look forward to expanding the possibilities of next-generation radiation imaging with this 'on demand' Compton camera," Professor Kataoka says.


Patent
Waseda University and Nissan Chemical Industries Ltd. | Date: 2016-03-09

A fused-ring quinone-substituted polynorbornene has recurring units of formula (1) and/or (2) below. In formulas (1) and (2), A^(1 )is independently a substituent of formula (3) or (4) below, n is an integer from 1 to 6, and A^(2 )is a substituent of formula (5) or (6) below. In formulas (3) to (6), each X is independently a single bond or a divalent group, and Ar^(1 )and Ar^(2 )are each independently an aromatic hydrocarbon ring or an oxygen atom or sulfur atom-containing aromatic heterocycle that forms together with two carbon atoms on a benzoquinone skeleton. This polymer has charge-storing properties and, when used as an electrode active material, is capable of providing a high-performance battery possessing high capacity, high rate characteristics and high cycle characteristics.


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.undercurrentnews.com

Japanese Parliament agreed unanimously to ratify the first international treaty tackling illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing—the Port State Measures Agreement (PSMA)—on Wednesday, the Nature Conservancy said in a release. "This puts Japan, one of the three major seafood consuming nations in the world, at the forefront in the global fight against IUU fishing," the organization said. Maria Damanaki, global director for oceans at The Nature Conservancy, called the decision an important milestone in the fight against IUU. “...We expect to see important behavioral changes in the water over the next few years,” said Damanaki. “We look forward to working with Japan and other countries to increase the number of ratifications of this treaty, and ensuring its effective implementation, for which inter-governmental cooperation is the key." IUU fishing costs the global economy up to $23.5 billion per year and threatens the environment and the fishing communities in Japan that are operating in line with the rules. Between 11 million and 26m metric ton of fish are caught illegally every year—in other words, one in every four fish consumed is being caught illegally. The PSMA allows Japan to strengthen seafood inspections in ports, and—if there is enough evidence—to refuse IUU fishing vessels port entry or access to port services, including the landing, trans-shipment, processing and packaging of seafood. This step will allow Japan to work closely with other key major market states such as the European Union and the US to strengthen and align their port control schemes. The Nature Conservancy is co-hosting with Waseda University and the Japanese Fisheries Research Agency an important international conference on Seafood Transparency and Traceability to address IUU fishing, taking place in Tokyo on May 16-17. During the conference, the latest research on the impacts of IUU fishing on the global and Japanese economies will be introduced and sessions will feature discussions on potential pathways for international cooperation to combat IUU fishing. The conference will be aimed at working with the Japanese government and other stakeholders on the implementation of the PSMA Treaty, and supporting the enhancement of international coordination and cooperation between major seafood market states.


Patent
Waseda University and Fuji Electric Co. | Date: 2016-11-17

A highly thermally conductive printed circuit board prevents electrochemical migration by inhibiting elution of copper ions. The printed circuit board is a metal-base printed circuit board including a metal base plate having an insulating resin layer and a copper foil layer stacked thereon in this order. In the printed circuit board, the insulating resin layer contains a first inorganic filler made of inorganic particles having particle diameters of 0.1 nm to 600 nm with an average particle diameter (D_(50)) of 1 nm to 300 nm, and a second inorganic filler made of inorganic particles having particle diameters of 100 nm to 100 m with an average particle diameter (D_(50)) of 500 nm to 20 m, and the first inorganic filler and the second inorganic filler are uniformly dispersed in the insulating resin layer.


Aprile E.,Columbia University | Doke T.,Waseda University
Reviews of Modern Physics | Year: 2010

This article reviews the progress made over the last 20 years in the development and applications of liquid xenon detectors in particle physics, astrophysics, and medical imaging experiments. A summary of the fundamental properties of liquid xenon as radiation detection medium, in light of the most current theoretical and experimental information is first provided. After an introduction of the different type of liquid xenon detectors, a review of past, current, and future experiments using liquid xenon to search for rare processes and to image radiation in space and in medicine is given. Each application is introduced with a survey of the underlying scientific motivation and experimental requirements before reviewing the basic characteristics and expected performance of each experiment. Within this decade it appears likely that large volume liquid xenon detectors operated in different modes will contribute to answering some of the most fundamental questions in particle physics, astrophysics, and cosmology, fulfilling the most demanding detection challenges. From detectors based solely on liquid xenon (LXe) scintillation, such as in the MEG experiment for the search of the rare " μ→eγ " decay, currently the largest liquid xenon detector in operation, and in the XMASS experiment for dark matter detection, to the class of time projection chambers which exploit both scintillation and ionization of LXe, such as in the XENON dark matter search experiment and in the Enriched Xenon Observatory for neutrinoless double beta decay, unrivaled performance and important contributions to physics in the next few years are anticipated. © 2010 The American Physical Society.

Loading Waseda University collaborators
Loading Waseda University collaborators