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Zhu Y.,University of California at Irvine | Qiu G.,Broadcom Corporation | Chi K.H.,University of California at Irvine | Wang B.B.T.,Wang Nmr Inc. | And 2 more authors.
IEEE Transactions on Magnetics | Year: 2010

In this paper, a compact X-band tunable Bandpass Filter (BPF) module which employs a pair of passive microstrip composite-BPFs in cascade on RT/Duroid 6010 substrate is reported. The passive microstrip composite-BPF was realized by combining four open-circuited stubs of a microstrip X-band BPF with four inductive elements of a stepped impedance low-pass filter. Placement of one YIG/GGG layer upon each of the passive microstrip composite-BPFs enables the resulting composite-BPFs to function simultaneously as an X-band BPF and a tunable Band-Stop Filter. By tuning the bias magnetic fields to 1780 and 2670 Oe, 2450 and 3250 Oe, and 1780 and 3 250 Oe on the pair of the composite-BPF, respectively, the passband of the module was tuned toward the high end, the low end, and the center frequencies. The corresponding center frequencies of 12, 7.9 and 10 GHz, minimum 3 dB bandwidth of 0.6, 0.4, and 0.5 GHz, respectively, and an insertion loss of 2.5 dB were measured. Compared to the BPF module reported recently, reductions of 43.5% in circuit area and 52.8% in insertion loss were achieved. The minimum 3 dB bandwidth was narrowed by 40%, 63.6%, and 58.3%, and its tuning ranges were extended from 3.7, 3.6, and 3.5 GHz to 4.1, 4.3, and 4.2 GHz, respectively. This newly realized tunable BPF module has demonstrated superior features such as more compact device structure, smaller device dimensions, lower insertion loss, and improved frequency tunability and selectivity. © 2006 IEEE.


Wang B.,Wang Nmr Inc. | Wahrer B.,Wang Nmr Inc. | Taylor C.,Wang Nmr Inc. | Zbasnik J.,Wang Nmr Inc. | And 17 more authors.
IEEE Transactions on Applied Superconductivity | Year: 2011

Hall B at Jefferson Laboratory (JLAB) will need a 5 T, 78 cm bore polarized target magnet with a field uniformity of ΔB/B0 < 10 -4 in a useful cylinder of the dimensions 0.04 m long X 0.02 m in diameter. The large magnet is designed with a superconducting coil that provides the solenoid with nearly perfect self shielding in order to reduce the fringe field at nearby photo multiplier tubes (PMTs) to less than 3.5 mT. Because the solenoid is also very close to the Clas12 Torus, the nearly perfect shielding provided by the self shielded solenoid greatly reduces force, field, and torque interactions with the six-coil Torus magnet. The solenoid coil consists of 18 coil modules which are made of coils mounted in aluminum plate discs. Each coil module consists of dual double pancake coils with main coils and shield coil partitioned into separate winding cavities in the aluminum plate discs to distribute and reduce radial hoop load and radial coil forces. Each coil module is effectively an enclosed aluminum box and this serves to partition the axial load and thus reduces coil axial forces. Since overall coil forces within each coil module are reduced, this will greatly reduce the number coil training quenches. This is a very important consideration for this solenoid coil because the coil cooling is adiabatic, using in-direct conduction cooling by 4.5 K supercritical helium, which will provide only a relatively small temperature stability margin. Super critical helium is used as per JLAB specification. Detail design of the coil structure, coil assembly, cold mass, and cryogenic control will be presented. The magnet protection system shall be capable of the following features: (1) quench and fault detection, (2) fast discharge of the magnet, (3) limit fault voltages to safe values, (4) monitor interlock signals to prevent unsafe operation, and (5) provide control logic necessary for safe operation of the solenoid. The instrument systems shall be capable of the following features: (1) monitors and display temperatures within the solenoid magnet, (2) measure loads or stress on the magnet suspension, (3) monitor voltages within the solenoid magnet and charging bus, (4) monitor pressures and (5) use data logging system to save all sensor data. These systems will be described and a quench analysis presented. © 2010 IEEE.


Wang B.,Wang Nmr Inc. | Wahrer B.,Wang Nmr Inc. | Taylor C.,Wang Nmr Inc. | Zbasnik J.,Wang Nmr Inc. | And 17 more authors.
IEEE Transactions on Applied Superconductivity | Year: 2011

Hall B at Jefferson Laboratory (JLAB) will need a 6-coil Torus producing a required integral of B-dl for an upgrade 12 GeV beam. In Sept. 2009, Wang NMR was awarded a contract to design, fabricate, assemble, deliver, and test at JLAB this exciting magnet. The preliminary design review was completed by Dec. 2009 and intermediate design review will be completed by July 2010. Prototype coil construction, production of soldered conductor with SSC cable and final design review will be completed in 2010. We shall describe preliminary design and intermediate design for coil/cryostat, Torus central cylinder (hub), 48 cold mass suspensions, two intercoil support rings, cryocontrol tower, and adapter to Torus coil, magnet quench protection, and charge/discharge control, and the two parallel path cooling design using supercritical helium. Because of coil in-plane and out-of-plane EM forces over these huge thin coils in addition to vacuum load, gravity load, and cool down thermal stress, we shall present the finite element analyses (FEA) on coil structure, 48 cold mass supports, intercoil cold rings, coil/cryostat vacuum vessel, cryotower cryostat, and Torus hub. Finally, we shall shows that all pressure/vacuum vessels and its weldment has satisfied ASME code. © 2011 IEEE.


Quettier L.,Jefferson Lab | Burkert V.,Jefferson Lab | Elouadrhiri L.,Jefferson Lab | Kashy D.,Jefferson Lab | And 11 more authors.
IEEE Transactions on Applied Superconductivity | Year: 2011

Hadron physics has been an essential part of the physics program with the CLAS detector in experimental hall B at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab). With the 12 GeV upgrade of the CEBAF machine, hadron physics in Hall B will be extended to a new domain of higher mass resonances and the range of higher transferred momentum using up to 11 GeV electron beams and the upgraded CLAS12 detector. In this paper, status of the hall B superconducting magnets for the 12 GeV upgrade is presented. © 2011 IEEE.


Arbelaez D.,Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | Black A.,Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | Prestemon S.O.,Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | Wang S.,Wang Nmr Inc. | And 2 more authors.
IEEE Transactions on Applied Superconductivity | Year: 2011

An eight-pole superconducting magnet is being developed for soft x-ray magnetic dichroism (XMD) experiments at the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkley National Laboratory (LBNL). Eight conical Nb3Sn coils with Holmium poles are arranged in octahedral symmetry to form four dipole pairs that provide magnetic fields of up to 5 T in any direction relative to the incoming x-ray beam. The dimensions of the magnet yoke as well as pole taper, diameter, and length were optimized for maximum peak field in the magnet center using the software package TOSCA. The structural analysis of the magnet is performed using ANSYS with the coil properties derived using a numerical homogenization scheme. It is found that the use of orthotropic material properties for the coil has an important influence in the design of the magnet. © 2011 IEEE.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2013

This project proposal is for nanometer wavelength undulators with a low energy electron beam (1-2 GeV) and with a ultrashort period (less than 10 mm) which meet the requirements for the next generation of undulator radiation sources. The proposed design will have a deflection parameter K=1 and a peak gap field B & gt; 1 T. We have performed feasibility studies on second generation high temperature superconducting (2G HTS) YBCO wires and we concluded that, at 4.2 K, a coil with an average current density of 1,500 A/ mm2 can be designed and used to construct an ultra short period undulator with a period less than 10 mm and generate 1.1 T peak field at 3 mm beam gap. The proposed YBCO wire will be 3 mm width x 0.1 mm thick with kapton insulation, and is available from Superpower Inc. It is proposed to have an iron pole of 1.6 to 2.0 mm in thickness and an overall axial coil thickness equal to 6 mm for a pair of adjacent YBCO coils wound as double pancake. Thus, the period will be 9.6 mm to 10.0 mm. We shall compute coil forces and perform finite element stress analysis to confirm that a critical tensile coil stress will be less than 550 MPa and conductor critical axial tensile strain will be less than 0.45%. Today, YBCO wire can be obtained from Superpower Inc for a reasonable price of $50-$60 per 50 A-m for a continuous length of 50-100 m. A typical 50 pole YBCO undulator magnet will need an approximately 2500 m length of 2G HTS wire. Thus, the total wire cost for a 50 pole undulator magnet will be about $150K. These wires can be connected with a lap-joint at the outermost turns of a YBCO double pancake coil. A lap joint made by soft soldering can achieve a resistivity of about 40-50 n-cm2. In Phase 1, we shall design a race track YBCO coil with a minimum bending diameter of 12.5 mm which is feasible as compared with the critical bending diameter of 11 mm for both tension and compression. In addition, we shall complete the cryostat design for the YBCO undulator coils. The cryostat will have a clear cold beam aperature of 3 mm. Furthermore, we shall develop a 5-pole prototype YBCO SCU and perform test in an open dewar. In Phase 2, the 50-pole YBCO SCU magnet will be built and operated at 4.2 K in open dewar. Then, we shall install in a two-cooler-cryostat with a gold plate OFHC cold beam duct. The beam duct will have a clear beam aperature of 3 mm. We shall completely test the YBCO undulator and its coil cryostat. When Phase 2 is successfully completed, the system will be ready to be installed for use in USA & apos;s advanced light source facilities.


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2016

Electron-ion colliders (EIC) have been identified as an ideal tool to study the next frontier of nuclear physics – the gluon force that holds the building blocks of matter together, and which is a fundamental component of the theory of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). Future electron-ion colliders under consideration can be based on the Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) architecture. The beam lines for this architecture could be built of the newly developed Non-Scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (NS FFAG) structure, so that they can transfer multiple energies within the same aperture. This structure allows for the use of compact, economical quadupole permanent magnets. In this SBIR, we propose to design and to manufacture prototype quadrupole permanent magnets of focusing/defocusing combined function for use in this beam line. Wang NMR propose to design and build the focusing/defocusing quadrupole with a gradient strength of 50 T/m and with a beam gap of 16mm. The proposed permanent magnet material is SmCo because of its higher radiation resistance as compared to NdBFe2. The use of permanent magnets will reduce the overall cost. In Phase I, we shall take the recent design by Dr. Dejan Trbojevic, and then rerun Tosca code on the design to optimize the iron yoke with respect to the thickness of SmCo. In Phase I, we shall fabricate one prototype focusing/defocusing combined function quadruple. Wang NMR shall measure field quality dG/Go. In Phase II, based on Wang NMR’s Phase I prototype experience, Wang NMR shall improve the design and fabricate a production quadruple, and design and incorporate coils for skew dipoles and normal quadrupole correctors, etc. In addition, we shall fabricate enough quadrupoles for one cell. The development of quadrupole permanent magnets is of fundamental importance for there application in the future electron-ion colliders. This accelerator structure will also advance the development of muon accelerators and allow for the development of compact, simplified, less expensive proton accelerators which will promote their use in areas such as proton cancer therapy, and for high-power proton drivers for tritium and neutron production, waste transmutation, driving a sub-critical nuclear reactor to produce energy, cargo contain inspection, and radioisotope production.

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