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News Article | February 13, 2017
Site: www.techradar.com

UPDATE: Though not available yet, Stan has announced that it is bringing 4K streams and offline viewing to its service this year – two highly requested features that could add a lot of value for subscribers and put Stan on a level playing field with its competitors. We'll keep you informed of when these features will drop as soon as we know more – updated article below! Now that streaming media has become a mainstay in Australian homes, Aussies have plenty of options to choose from when it comes to getting their home entertainment fix. When combined, Netflix, Stan and Amazon Prime Video offer an enormous range of content that can be instantly streamed into your home. However, if you can only afford one subscription service, narrowing down a definitive choice can be harder than it seems. As each service brings with it a unique range of television shows and movies aimed at different segments of the streaming audience, not to mention differing price points, device compatibility and streaming qualities, we've taken it upon ourselves bring you an in-depth guide to what you can expect from Australia's three major SVOD platforms. With the constantly evolving nature of each service discussed in this guide, we will endeavour to keep you updated on any significant changes and updates that may occur to these streaming giants in the future. Here's how the Australian streaming situation stacks up in 2016. Probably the best thing about having so many streaming options to choose from, is that it forces each service to be priced competitively. Last to arrive to Australia, Netflix offers the cheapest stream of the main three, with a single stream in standard definition at $8.99, which, if we're being honest, isn't particularly good value, but may appeal to those who live alone and have a poor quality internet connection. Thankfully, for $11.99 a month you can get a dual-stream subscription that offers HD streaming quality. If 4K streams are what you're after, you'll need to subscribe to Netflix's premium package, which costs $14.99 a month and allows you to watch the service on four devices simultaneously. This is probably the most ideal subscription for families with differing tastes in shows and movies. It should also be noted that a proposed Netflix Tax may raise the price slightly in the near in future. Though Netflix is obviously working off of how it's priced overseas, Stan has chosen to come out at the low, no-nonsense price of $10 a month. This kind of price cuts straight to the point – once you've tested the service's 30 day trial, you're either on board with forking over a tenner each month, or you're not. Undercutting Netflix's pricing substantially, Amazon has a special introductory offer that grants new subscribers access to the service for a monthly fee US$2.99 (AU$4) for the first six months, after which it will renew at US$5.99 (AU$8) each month after that. For many people, the decision of which streaming service to sign up for may come down to the devices they own. Netflix has the biggest global reach and has been around the longest, which is why it can be streamed on the largest number of devices. The Netflix app is available on a wide range of smart TVs from manufacturers like Samsung, Sony, LG, Panasonic, Philips and Hisense, though you should check your television model to see if the service is supported. Stan is available on all 2013-2015 Samsung smart TVs featuring Smart Hub software, 2014-2016 Sony smart TVs (running Android TV) and all 2014-2015 LG smart TVs running WebOS and Netcast software. It's also just been announced that Stan is now streaming on selected 2015 and 2016 model Hisense smart TVs, and will also be available on every Hisense TV released in 2017. At present, Amazon Prime Video only officially offers its service in Australia through computer browsers, however, the Amazon Prime app has sneakily appeared on a number of 4K smart TVs, such as Sony's Android TV models. Before settling on Prime, you should check and see if you smart TV has an app for it. And, while Amazon Prime Video hasn't officially released console apps in Australia yet, there is a simple trick to streaming the service on your Xbox One. If your smart TV is of the 4K/UHD variety, chances are that its Netflix app supports 4K streaming. You can also get a 4K Netflix stream for the latest wave of Ultra HD Blu-ray players, such as the Panasonic DMP-UB900 and the Samsung UBD-K8500. Microsoft's newest console, the Xbox One S, also offers 4K playback. The Apple TV also supports Netflix and has features built around service, such as the ability to use Siri to search for titles by voice, which places Netflix titles appear alongside iTunes listings. A Stan app is also available for Apple TV, but Amazon won't allow its app on Apple TV or Chromecast for business reasons. With that said, you should be able to display Amazon Prime Video on your Apple TV through AirPlay. So far, Siri functionality is only available to Netflix. Netflix, Stan and Amazon Prime Video are all available on iOS and Android smartphones and tablets, though some older Android models may not be compatible. When it comes to game consoles, Netflix has the biggest reach, with apps for Xbox 360, Xbox One, Xbox One S, PS3, PS4 and the Nintendo Wii U. Stan has most of the consoles covered but lacks support for Xbox 360 and Wii U. Netflix and Stan are also available on Fetch TV, which is quite handy for the hundreds of thousands of Australians currently subscribed to Fetch. If you don't have any of the TV-connected devices listed above and still want to watch Netflix and Stan on your television, each service can also be streamed to a Google Chromecast, which ostensibly provides regular TVs with smart TV functionality (so long as you have a smartphone or tablet to stream from). Finally, you can watch Netflix and Stan on the Roku 2-powered Telstra TV media streaming box. When it comes to kids shows and movies, each service has its own strengths and weaknesses. Stan has a wide selection of children-friendly shows that mostly stem from its partnerships with Turner Broadcasting (the Cartoon Network), the ABC and Viacom. Cartoon Network favourites like Adventure Time, Ben 10, Regular Show, The Powerpuff Girls, Cow and Chicken, Generator Rex and Ed, Edd, n Eddy are all ready to stream on Stan. Likewise, classic ABC titles like The Wiggles, Dorothy the Dinosaur, Guess How Much I Love You and Justine Clarke, as well as overseas titles like Octonauts, Angelina Ballerina, Bob the Builder, Thomas and Friends, Fireman Sam, Sesame Street and Mister Maker are available to stream on the app, and its Viacom deal brings with it a large range of shows from Nickelodeon and Nick Jr, like Avatar: The Last Airbender; Octonauts, Ni Hao, Kai-Lan, Bubble Guppies, and popular live-action shows like iCarly, VICTORiOUS, and Drake & Josh. Like the rest of Amazon Prime Video's content library, its Kids selection is quite sparse at present. You'll find a number of Amazon Original kids shows you've probably never heard of, like Wishenpoof!, Tumble Leaf and Just Add Magic, alongside some tried-and-true kids movies classics, like The Little Rascals, Casper, Spy Kids and Babe. Netflix also has a wide-ranging partnership with Walt Disney, bringing with it films and TV shows from Walt Disney Animation Studios, Pixar Animation Studios, Marvel Studios and Lucasfilm. Animation fans will be happy to know that Netflix has also produced some original shows based on classic DreamWorks properties, including Puss in Boots and How to Train Your Dragon. Deals with other big children's program distributors Saban, DHX Media and Hasbro Studios have also provided Netflix with numerous incarnations of Power Rangers and My Little Pony. Special mention should also be given to inclusion of the classic Aussie kid's show, Round the Twist, on both Netflix and Stan's respective catalogues. A wide and varied range of television shows are available on Netflix, Stan and Amazon Prime Video, thanks to individual deals between each of the SVOD services and their content partners. Because of this, each service should have something for everyone in your family. While there's a lot of crossover when it comes to the availability of shows on each platform, perhaps the most important deciding factor comes down to the exclusives and original shows available on each service. Netflix is without question the leader in this regard, with a large, global slate of original shows that are, for the most part, available in every one of its territories around the world. The service has achieved huge success with its diverse lineup, which includes award-winning shows House of Cards and Orange is the New Black, long-form superhero shows like Marvel's Daredevil and Jessica Jones, internationally-targeted shows like Narcos, animated sitcoms such as BoJack Horseman and F is For Family, comedies like Fuller House, Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt and Master of None, and countless stand up comedy specials, to name but a small selection from its rapidly-expanding library. Though Stan is only available in Australia, it has already begun creating its own original content, having produced the improvised comedy series No Activity, the upcoming TV spin-off of Wolf Creek and the second season of Plonk. Stan is notable for also having a large range of exclusive shows in its stable, with Mozart in the Jungle, Transparent, Power, UnReal, Community, Lost Girl, Dig, Gallipoli, Ash vs Evil Dead, 11.22.63 and Better Call Saul tied to the service for the entire life of each series. Unlike its competitors, Stan also fast-tracks new episodes of its exclusive shows as soon as they air overseas. As the newest service to hit Australian shores, Amazon Prime Video doesn't currently have much of a content library on offer, then again, that probably goes a long way to explaining why the subscription price is so cheap for the first six months. Most people considering a Prime subscription are probably looking to watch The Grand Tour, the new car enthusiast show from the team behind the beloved series, Top Gear. If that's what you're after, you'll happy to know that every available episode of the series is available on Amazon Prime Video in HDR, with new episodes arriving weekly. Other big Amazon Original shows include Mozart in the Jungle and Transparent, though these shows have been available on Stan direct from the US for quite some time. That said, there are others which are only available to stream on Amazon Prime, including The Man in the High Castle, Red Oaks, Hand of God and Bosch. You'll also find a small selection of classic shows, like The Shield and Justified.


News Article | December 9, 2016
Site: www.24-7pressrelease.com

LOS ANGELES, CA, December 09, 2016 /24-7PressRelease/ -- Concluding 2016, NFMLA invites families to enjoy three fun-filled screening programs dedicated to well crafted family friendly content that will appeal to both children and adults. The fourth short program is a collection of powerful stories from the creative cinematic community of the Middle East. Filmmakers and talent will be in attendance and participating in the audience Q&A led by Danny DeLillo. Short Program #1 Dust Buddies - directed by Sam Wade and Beth Tomashek Beth Tomashek is a Character Designer and Visual Development Artist based in Sarasota, FL where she is currently studying Computer Animation at the Ringling College of Art and Design. Sam Wade is a Ringling graduate and has "expert knowledge of the entire animation production pipeline with a special interest in production management, animation, and modeling." Illegal Move - directed by Sana Srinivasan and Kyle Lopez The three-minute CG short Illegal Move was written and directed by Sana Srinivasan and Kyle Lopez. Sana is a senior Computer Animation student at Ringling College with a minor in Business of Art and Design. Kyle Lopez a Ringling College Computer Animation graduate with experiences in animation, modeling, lighting, and compositing. Last Shot - directed by Aemilia Widodo Up-and coming filmmaker Aemilia Widodo is a senior in Computer Animation at Ringling College. Her thesis film Last Shot was a Finalist for the university's Student Academy Awards. The short tells the story of a girl who, just discovering the joys of photography, ends up breaking her camera by accident. Rupee Run - directed by Tarun Lak Filmmaker Tarun Lak is a Computer animation senior at Ringling College based in Sarasota. Originally, he is from Chennai, India. Rupee Run is his senior thesis film and has won the President's award that was honored by the President of Ringling College in 2016. The Bookworm - directed by Richard Wiley Richard Wiley is a 2016 Ringling graduate, where he studied Computer Animation. His short The Bookworm was an official selection at the Gold Coast International Film Festival 2016, and the Camelot Films International Film Festival. The Wish Granter - directed by Echo Wu, Kal Athannassov, and John McDonald Echo Wu, Kal Athannassov, and John McDonald are Ringling College graduates with a Bachelor degree in Computer Animation. Following her graduation, Echo interned at Blue Sky Studios as a production manager and hopes to one day be a Producer. Kal always knew he wanted to be in animation and is currently a Character Artist at PullString, Inc. John remembers ever since he could hold a pencil that he wanted to be an artist. In the summer of 2015 he interned as a dimensional designer at Walt Disney Imagineering. The Controller - directed by Bob Yong, Ian Ie, and Kang Yung Ho Bob Yong, Ian Ie, and Kang Yung Ho worked for 16 months on their short film The Controller. Bob is a Ringling College graduate and "a passionate animator seeking for opportunities to grow and learn in productions ranging from feature films to television ads and video game apps". Ian is currently completing his Bachelor's degree in Computer animation. Trashunauts - directed by Jack Corpening Jack Corpening is a Visual Development Artist & Animation Major at the Ringling College of Art + Design and works as 2D/3D Artist at Psyop in Los Angeles: "Strong design occurs in both 2D and 3D. My goal is to make that spark ignite in any dimension through any means." His Specialties include character and environment visual development / concept art. I Can't Sleep - directed by Cole Montminy Young filmmaker Cole Montminy's short animation film I Can't Sleep tells the story of an insomnia ridden boy, who is sensorially overwhelmed due to the urban environment that surrounds him. The Trees of Eden - directed by Dwight Hwang Dwight Hwang worked fifteen years in the animation industry as a storyboard artist. He is a past winner of a Student Emmy in 1999 with his CalArts Thesis, and his next short was selected to the Official Selection at Cannes (Court Metrage) in 2000. He is currently a recent USC film graduate. Stars - directed by Han Zhang Han Zhang graduated from the China Academy of Art with a BFA in 2D Animation and did his MFA at the Academy of Art university. As an animator, Han likes to "explore different visual styles to make his film look pretty". Short Program #2 Hamburger High - directed by Joe Swanson Lisa Pizza, a slice of pepperoni pizza, navigates her way through high school. Student Emmy Award-winner Joe Swanson is writer and first-time director. Swanson is NFMLA alumni having shown the short film he wrote in 2011, 'The Maiden and the Princess' at the festival. Nelson Bixby Takes on the Whole Wide World - directed by Francisco Lorite Spaniard Francisco Lorite wrote and directed his first film at 14. He appeared in Off-Broadway plays, indie films, and commercials. He also became a member of the Shakespeare Lab at the celebrated Joseph Papp Public Theatre. His shorts won several awards including the prestigious Imagen Award for Best Theatrical Short Film. Virtual High - directed by Camille Stochitch Camille Stochitch and Alexander Berman serve as writers and directors. Stochitch won a Student Academy Award for her short Interstate, which was also nominated for a Student BAFTA Award. Berman's short App premiered at the 2014 Tribeca Film Festival. Arcanum - directed by Mitchell Gould In the Arcanum short, a young rock and roller seeks a mystical artifact to save the world from an ancient evil, but the mysterious librarian who owns it has other plans. Up-and-coming filmmaker Mitchell Gould serves as writer and director. Actors Leo Howard, Louis Mandylor, Leah Lewis, and Jason Earles star in this short. Nu Skool Records - directed by Matthew Pizzano Inspired by true events, the short was written and executive produced by John Swetnam, who also wrote Step Up All In and Into the Storm. Director Matthew Pizzano's short film Becoming: Bradley Theodore played at the 2016 Tribeca Film Festival. How to Catch a Ghost - directed by Chris Scott Christopher Scott attended Hollywood High School, where he was accepted into the performing arts magnet program. During his four years in the program, he had leading roles in several stage productions and studied various styles of dance, particularly excelling in tap. How to Catch a Ghost is his first short film. Penelope and the Treehouse - directed by Jonathan Langager Jonathan Langager is a Student Academy Award winning filmmaker based in Los Angeles. After spending his adolescence painting and playing the piano and majoring in music at Carleton College, he finally moved to Los Angeles to attend USC graduate film school. His films have played at numerous festivals, winning awards at Slamdance, Cleveland International Film Festival, and more. Jonathan has created commercials and animations for brands such as Fresh Step, vitaminwater, and Benjamin Moore. Short Program #3 Lucy & Bear - directed by Angela Chen Director/producer Angela Chen's works have screened internationally at the Tribeca Film Festival, SXSW, Austin Film Festival, U.Frame Portugal, and many others.When asked about her objectives in filmmaking, Angela, rooted in both Taiwan and China, stated that she "likes to enlighten the human condition, the paradoxes of cause and effect, and the dynamics of the universe." Marty: A Wild West Neverland - directed by Vu Hoang Vũ Thị Hoang My is a Vietnamese beauty queen, athlete, humanitarian activist and a filmmaker. She was a multimedia design student at RMIT University (2011), Saigon South Campus and a BFA in filmmaking student at New York Film Academy. As a filmmaker, she produces both action and documentary features. Helix - directed by Matthew Merenda Filmmaker Matthew Merenda attended Ithaca College in New York to be a Cinema Photographer and received the full film school training. "It all started when I was middle school and my parents had an old VHS camcorder and my friends and I started making movies with it." He worked as a storyboard artist on the ad campaigns for The Social Network, Rio, and Disney's Tangled. The Royal Cake - directed by Sam Marin Sam Marin is animator and voice actor on Cartoon Network's Regular Show, voicing Benson, Pops and Muscle Man. He graduated from CalArts, and worked at Walt Disney Animation Studios as an animator, working there for three years before Regular Show was greenlit, leaving Disney to work for Cartoon Network. Short Program #4 - InFocus: Middle Eastern - A transcontinental journey of relevant stories through ancient lands of the middle east Avo - directed by Golnaz Jamsheed Director Golnaz Jamsheed was born in San Francisco. She received a Bachelor of Arts in Film from UCLA and was given a scholarship from the London Film School in order to receive her Masters degree in Filmmaking. Through filmmaking, she wants to "create new meaning and beauty by comparing our past and present, making a journey through the history of our country and exploring how things are evolving around us with technology, while we're using the spiritual essence of our culture." Old Friend - directed by Haider Hazim Iraqi Haider Hazim is credited as the film's director, writer, producer, editor, and visual effects editor. His first short Old Friend tells the story of Aran, an Iraqi private who narrowly escaped a recent battle. As he is hiding near a house, surrounded by militants, an old friend pops up, bringing new thoughts and emotions. Will that be enough to save him? Zaar - directed by Ibrahim Nada Ibrahim Nada is a young Egyptian director with a dystopian view of the world and society. His passion for filmmaking goes beyond transforming worth telling stories into movies. He believes that movies can "shed the light on the shadows of the dark world we live in." His main focus is to challenge the audience with these emotions by creating an experience that keeps them at their toes. And So Do I - directed by Jana Younes Jana Younes is a Lebanese filmmaker, choreographer, and dancer. Her work is focused on filming dance and body movement, "I want to do film, I have to dance" Her main work is focused on contemporary jazz, a fusion between the classical jazz and new contemporary techniques. Jana graduated as a filmmaker from the St Joseph University in Beirut. Her work is focused on filming dance. Her short And So Do I is "An exploration of family, love, absence, and hope. This freshly orchestrated film is a journey to the world of movement storytelling." Expire - directed by Henri Bassil Dubai-based Filmmaker Henri Bassil has directed commercials for companies including STC, Nissan, BMW, and Porsche. According to his own words, "Expire is my first short film since film school. It tells the story of a young man who goes on a journey of a lifetime." Security - directed by Neel Kumar Neel Kumar was born in Calcutta, India. A former copywriter, his works won a fair few international awards. He wrote, shot, and directed a short film about the company that was sent to Saatchi's network offices around the world. He helped set up a film production company based in Dubai, Neel and has since directed and produced commercials and corporate films for clients like Emirates, Land Rover, Toshiba, Samsung, Sharp, Anta Sports and a number of Dubai-based startups. Located in Downtown LA, South Park Center is the Presenting Venue Sponsor of NewFilmmakers LA film festival. Founded in 2007, NFMLA has screened over 1750+ films from over 69 countries. The organization provides a forum where filmmakers can be recognized with title supporters Sony Pictures Entertainment, SAG-AFTRA and FilmLA. For information or to reserve tickets to the NewFilmmakers LA December 17th, 2016 Film Festival, please visit http://www.NFMLA.org


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: www.techrepublic.com

The clearest sign that "software is eating the world" is the rush by companies both in and out of tech to open source their code. Recently the following headlines hit my inbox: Everything, it would seem, is open to open source, including presidential candidates. As to the question posed in the first headline, the answer to "Why open source?" is always "Because developers." Hence, in a world increasingly dependent on developers, enterprises need to get serious about open source, or figure out a good attorney to handle their bankruptcy proceedings. While the importance of developers has been an open secret for some time, the manner in which companies engage them has changed. Gone are the days when a wacky dance and an array of impressive developer tools could be considered sufficient. Microsoft took that strategy and turned it into multiple billion-dollar businesses, but today's environment requires more than tools. SEE Why every developer is an open source developer now In discussing why Pixar was open sourcing its Universal Scene Description (USD) technology, which aids filmmakers to work with 3D scene data, Ed Catmull, president of Pixar and Walt Disney Animation Studios, declared: "We believe that being open with our technology and sharing it with our peers in the industry is how we can best continue to drive innovation." Sure, but drive innovation for whom? After all, this technology is core to Pixar's technology strategy and, hence, its business. Why would the company gift its secret sauce to competitors? Pixar offered a big clue in its press release announcing the open sourcing of USD, when it mentioned: "The open-source Alembic project brought standardization of cached geometry interchange to the VFX industry" and that "USD hopes to build on Alembic's success, taking the next step of standardizing the 'algebra' by which assets are aggregated and refined in-context." Pixar benefited from Alembic, but arguably Lucasfilm and Sony Pictures, which jointly created the Alembic project in 2011, benefited more. Why? Because they were able to rally developers to their standard, freeing up resources to innovate in other areas. Pixar hopes to do the same with USD. Even if the de facto standardization effort fails, Pixar wins, because it sends a signal to developer recruits and existing employees that it's a great place for them to build code. Developers don't want their best work hidden behind a proprietary license. They want to work with the best people employed by their organization and with those outside their firewall. Which brings me to my last point: Whatever kind of enterprise you run, you need more developers. SEE The one way you can make your company run more like Facebook Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst clearly knows the value of selling services around open source, having shepherded his company to over $2 billion in annual revenue. But as he stressed, the real open source innovation is happening elsewhere. "As technology matures, we should expect the majority of IT innovation is going to come out of users, not vendors," Whitehurst said. Unlike vendors, who jealously guard their code so that they can license it, organizations like Pixar and The State of California have different motivations, leading them to treat software very differently, as Whitehurst called out: "The vast majority of that user-driven innovation is put out in open source." Such open source is a signal to developers that an employer is developer-friendly, and it also allows companies to collaborate on code even as they compete for box office market share, automobile customers, etc. Whatever your organization, in short, you need more developers, which means you also need more open source. A lot more.


News Article | April 10, 2016
Site: www.techtimes.com

Apple has finally opened its 4-inch iPhone SE and 9.7-inch iPad Pro account in India this month. The devices are now available in the country through its retail partners, both online and offline. Already available in countries like the U.S., the UK, Australia, China, and Japan, these devices were launched by their maker at a later date in India that forms a part of the second-wave launch countries. The 4-inch iPhone SE is available in two variants: 32 GB and 64 GB, with the former priced at Rs39,000 (around $586) and the latter at Rs49,000 (or $736). Tagged as the "Most Powerful Phone with a Four-inch Display," the device boasts of an advanced 12 megapixel 'iSight' camera running on the same 64-bit A9 chip that powers iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus. Available in Wi-Fi only and Wi-Fi+cellular models, the 9.7-inch iPad Pro has three variants: 32 GB, 128 GB, and 256 GB. The Wi-Fi-only 32 GB variant is available for Rs49,900 (or $750), with the 128 GB and 256 GB variants priced at Rs61,900 (about $930) and Rs73,900 (about $1,110) respectively. The Wi-Fi+cellular 32 GB, 128 GB, and 256 GB devices, on the other hand, come at slightly elevated prices of Rs61,900, Rs73,900, and Rs85,900 that come to about $930, $1110, and $1290 respectively. This extremely portable tablet comes with the all-new Apple Pencil and Smart Keyboard that makes finger movement on the tablet very easy and natural. The chief creative officer at Pixar and Walt Disney Animation Studios has gone on record to say that "iPad Pro and Apple Pencil are the closest we've ever been able to get in the digital world to actually drawing on paper." The 'pro Retina' display, four-speaker camera, 12-megapixel 'iSight' camera, the A9X chip, 5-megapixel FaceTime HD camera, and the new True Tone feature that automatically fixes the brightness under varying lights — all make the new device the natural upgrade for the existing iPad and PC users. The current Apple distributors in India are Beetek Teletech Limited and Redington India. © 2016 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


Zhu Y.,University of California at Los Angeles | Sifakis E.,University of California at Los Angeles | Teran J.,Walt Disney Animation Studios | Brandt A.,Weizmann Institute of Science
ACM Transactions on Graphics | Year: 2010

We present a multigrid framework for the simulation of high-resolution elastic deformable models, designed to facilitate scalability on shared memory multiprocessors. We incorporate several state-of-the-art techniques from multigrid theory, while adapting them to the specific requirements of graphics and animation applications, such as the ability to handle elaborate geometry and complex boundary conditions. Our method supports simulation of linear elasticity and corotational linear elasticity. The efficiency of our solver is practically independent of material parameters, even for near-incompressible materials. We achieve simulation rates as high as 6 frames per second for test models with 256K vertices on an 8-core SMP, and 1.6 frames per second for a 2M vertex object on a 16-core SMP. © 2010 ACM.


Stomakhin A.,Walt Disney Animation Studios | Schroeder C.,University of California at Los Angeles | Jiang C.,University of California at Los Angeles | Chai L.,Walt Disney Animation Studios | And 2 more authors.
ACM Transactions on Graphics | Year: 2014

In this paper, we introduce a novel material point method for heat transport, melting and solidifying materials. This brings a wider range of material behaviors into reach of the already versatile material point method. This is in contrast to best-of-breed fluid, solid or rigid body solvers that are difficult to adapt to a wide range of materials. Extending the material point method requires several contributions. We introduce a dilational/deviatoric splitting of the constitutive model and show that an implicit treatment of the Eulerian evolution of the dilational part can be used to simulate arbitrarily incompressible materials. Furthermore, we show that this treatment reduces to a parabolic equation for moderate compressibility and an elliptic, Chorin-style projection at the incompressible limit. Since projections are naturally done on marker and cell (MAC) grids, we devise a staggered grid MPM method. Lastly, to generate varying material parameters, we adapt a heat-equation solver to a material point framework. Copyright © ACM.


Noris G.,ETH Zurich | Hornung A.,Disney Research Zurich | Sumner R.W.,Disney Research Zurich | Simmons M.,Walt Disney Animation Studios | Gross M.,ETH Zurich
ACM Transactions on Graphics | Year: 2013

Vectorization provides a link between raster scans of pencil-and-paper drawings and modern digital processing algorithms that require accurate vector representations. Even when input drawings are comprised of clean, crisp lines, inherent ambiguities near junctions make vectorization deceptively difficult. As a consequence, current vectorization approaches often fail to faithfully capture the junctions of drawn strokes. We propose a vectorization algorithm specialized for clean line drawings that analyzes the drawing's topology in order to overcome junction ambiguities. A gradient-based pixel clustering technique facilitates topology computation. This topological information is exploited during centerline extraction by a new reverse drawing procedure that reconstructs all possible drawing states prior to the creation of a junction and then selects the most likely stroke configuration. For cases where the automatic result does not match the artist's interpretation, our drawing analysis enables an efficient user interface to easily adjust the junction location. We demonstrate results on professional examples and evaluate the vectorization quality with quantitative comparison to hand-traced centerlines as well as the results of leading commercial algorithms. © 2013 ACM.


News Article | November 17, 2016
Site: www.cnet.com

Walt Disney Animation Studios heads out to sea with its next computer-generated feature film, called "Moana." It's a coming-of-age story about a girl named Moana, voiced by newcomer Auli'I Cravalho, who sets sail on a mission to save her people. Along the way she meets the mighty demigod Maui, voiced by Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson. I had a chance to sit down with visual effects supervisor Kyle Odermatt and head of effects Marlon West to get a deep dive on how they created Disney's most effects-filled movie ever. Water is wet. You might take it for granted, but every particle of water has been built from the ground up. Water isn't only a backdrop for the film. It's also one of the stars. West talks about how they gave water "life." Disney Animation also relies on their Hyperion Renderer and the Matterhorn engine from previous movies, like "Big Hero 6" and "Frozen." Te Ká, the living volcano, was made possible in "Moana" thanks to evolutions in those technologies. "Moana" will hit US theaters on November 23, 2016.


Whited B.,Walt Disney Animation Studios | Rossignac J.,Georgia Institute of Technology
IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics | Year: 2011

We define b-compatibility for planar curves and propose three ball morphing techniques between pairs of b-compatible curves. Ball-morphs use the automatic ball-map correspondence, proposed by Chazal et al. [1], from which we derive different vertex trajectories (linear, circular, and parabolic). All three morphs are symmetric, meeting both curves with the same angle, which is a right angle for the circular and parabolic. We provide simple constructions for these ball-morphs and compare them to each other and other simple morphs (linear-interpolation, closest-projection, curvature-interpolation, Laplace-blending, and heat-propagation) using six cost measures (travel-distance, distortion, stretch, local acceleration, average squared mean curvature, and maximum squared mean curvature). The results depend heavily on the input curves. Nevertheless, we found that the linear ball-morph has consistently the shortest travel-distance and the circular ball-morph has the least amount of distortion. © 2011 IEEE.


Ainsley S.,Columbia University | Vouga E.,Columbia University | Grinspun E.,Columbia University | Tamstorf R.,Walt Disney Animation Studios
ACM Transactions on Graphics | Year: 2012

We extend the Asynchronous Contact Mechanics algorithm [Harmon et al. 2009] and improve its performance by two orders of magnitude, using only optimizations that do not compromise ACM's three guarantees of safety, progress, and correctness. The key to this speedup is replacing ACM's timid, forward-looking mechanism for detecting collisions-locating and rescheduling separating plane kinetic data structures-with an optimistic speculative method inspired by Mirtich's rigid body Time Warp algorithm [2000]. Time warp allows us to perform collision detection over a window of time containingmany of ACM's asynchronous trajectory changes; in this way we cull away large intervals as being collision free. Moreover, by replacing force processing intermingled with KDS rescheduling by windows of pure processing followed by collision detection, we transform an algorithm that is very difficult to parallelize into one that is embarrassingly parallel. © 2012 ACM.

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