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PALO ALTO, Calif., Feb. 28, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Paysa, the only platform that uses artificial intelligence (AI) to deliver personalized career and hiring recommendations plus real-world salary insights, today announced the results of a new study, revealing the 10 worst cities and companies when it comes to undercompensating their employees (according to market value) by at least 10 percent or more. The study considered base salary, equity and bonus pay. To create this and an earlier study, revealing that more than one-third (nearly two million people) are underpaid by 10 percent or more, Paysa examined more than five million resumes of tech and engineering professionals and found that the pay gap can be significant. Considering that the average salary for a software engineer is $112,000.00, this translates into a minimum of $11,200.00, per person, per year in lost wages. Considering the total number of people underpaid by this amount, as found in the study, this translates into more than $20 billion in lost wages for employees, which these companies kept for their own profits. These lost wages represent a significant negative impact to local economies since these employees did not have this money to spend locally. In addition, per this earlier Paysa research, within the next six months, seven percent of all tech and engineering workers across the U.S. will be due for a promotion with a salary increase of $17,756.00, on average. Where do employees have the greatest likelihood of being undercompensated? According to this latest study, the top five cities are Seattle, Boston, San Francisco, San Jose and Los Angeles and the top five companies are Accenture, Glassdoor, Pinterest, Microsoft and Dropbox. The same study also shows that women in markets across the U.S. are 45 percent likely to be undercompensated while their male counterparts are only 38 percent likely to have the same experience. Overall, the Paysa research shows that younger workers or those with only 0-2 years-of-experience are 42 percent likely to be underpaid, indicating that the more junior an employee is in terms of years-of-experience, the greater propensity they have to be taken advantage of in terms of not getting compensated according to market value. At the same time, those with 2-5 years of experience are 44 percent likely to be undercompensated and employees with 20 years or more under their belts are only 24 percent likely to be affected by a gap in pay. On the flip side, the 10 companies least likely to undercompensate their tech and engineering talent include Intuit, Amazon, WalmartLabs, MZ, Capital One, Yelp, Yahoo!, Qualcomm, Bloomberg LP and Netflix. The full study and report is now available from Paysa. Highlights from the study’s findings include the following. The 10 cities that are most likely to undercompensate their tech and engineering pros and the likelihood of them doing so are: The 10 companies that are most likely to pay their tech and engineering the worst and the likelihood of them doing so include: Employees who think they might be underpaid can benefit from Paysa’s new Get A Raise Tool, which shows them how they are currently doing, in terms of getting paid according to market value and their skills, background and education. The tool also shows employees what they could be getting, available jobs that match their unique profile and offers resources for negotiating a raise with their current employer, if that is the path they want to pursue. “The gap between actual pay and market value can be remarkable – even in top cities and at leading companies,” said Chris Bolte, CEO of Paysa. “Thankfully, the tables are now turning for tech and engineering employees across the board, giving them a level of data transparency that is long overdue in a way that was never before possible. At Paysa, we’re on a mission to make this happen with greater control for the employee.” “Our goal is to help tech and engineering employees make sure their pay reflects what they bring to the table -- not their gender or where they work, where they are originally from or where they now live,” added Bolte. “We’re excited to share this and other research to help individuals have more productive conversations with their employers around salary and pay and, in the end, get what they deserve.” About Paysa  Paysa offers personalized career and hiring recommendations plus real-world salary insights for maximizing opportunity, earning potential and value at all stages of an individual’s career. Using proprietary artificial intelligence technology and machine learning algorithms, Paysa analyzes millions of data points including jobs, resumes and compensation information, providing professionals with actionable tools, insights, and research. They can then see and understand their individual worth in the market today, and how to increase their value. Paysa also empowers enterprises with the knowledge they need to be competitive in today’s fierce tech hiring market. Employers can learn which skills, real-world company experience and educational background offers the greatest predictor of a candidate’s or employee’s future success at their organization.


PALO ALTO, Calif., Feb. 28, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Paysa, the only platform that uses artificial intelligence (AI) to deliver personalized career and hiring recommendations plus real-world salary insights, today announced the results of a new study, revealing the 10 worst cities and companies when it comes to undercompensating their employees (according to market value) by at least 10 percent or more. The study considered base salary, equity and bonus pay. To create this and an earlier study, revealing that more than one-third (nearly two million people) are underpaid by 10 percent or more, Paysa examined more than five million resumes of tech and engineering professionals and found that the pay gap can be significant. Considering that the average salary for a software engineer is $112,000.00, this translates into a minimum of $11,200.00, per person, per year in lost wages. Considering the total number of people underpaid by this amount, as found in the study, this translates into more than $20 billion in lost wages for employees, which these companies kept for their own profits. These lost wages represent a significant negative impact to local economies since these employees did not have this money to spend locally. In addition, per this earlier Paysa research, within the next six months, seven percent of all tech and engineering workers across the U.S. will be due for a promotion with a salary increase of $17,756.00, on average. Where do employees have the greatest likelihood of being undercompensated? According to this latest study, the top five cities are Seattle, Boston, San Francisco, San Jose and Los Angeles and the top five companies are Accenture, Glassdoor, Pinterest, Microsoft and Dropbox. The same study also shows that women in markets across the U.S. are 45 percent likely to be undercompensated while their male counterparts are only 38 percent likely to have the same experience. Overall, the Paysa research shows that younger workers or those with only 0-2 years-of-experience are 42 percent likely to be underpaid, indicating that the more junior an employee is in terms of years-of-experience, the greater propensity they have to be taken advantage of in terms of not getting compensated according to market value. At the same time, those with 2-5 years of experience are 44 percent likely to be undercompensated and employees with 20 years or more under their belts are only 24 percent likely to be affected by a gap in pay. On the flip side, the 10 companies least likely to undercompensate their tech and engineering talent include Intuit, Amazon, WalmartLabs, MZ, Capital One, Yelp, Yahoo!, Qualcomm, Bloomberg LP and Netflix. The full study and report is now available from Paysa. Highlights from the study’s findings include the following. The 10 cities that are most likely to undercompensate their tech and engineering pros and the likelihood of them doing so are: The 10 companies that are most likely to pay their tech and engineering the worst and the likelihood of them doing so include: Employees who think they might be underpaid can benefit from Paysa’s new Get A Raise Tool, which shows them how they are currently doing, in terms of getting paid according to market value and their skills, background and education. The tool also shows employees what they could be getting, available jobs that match their unique profile and offers resources for negotiating a raise with their current employer, if that is the path they want to pursue. “The gap between actual pay and market value can be remarkable – even in top cities and at leading companies,” said Chris Bolte, CEO of Paysa. “Thankfully, the tables are now turning for tech and engineering employees across the board, giving them a level of data transparency that is long overdue in a way that was never before possible. At Paysa, we’re on a mission to make this happen with greater control for the employee.” “Our goal is to help tech and engineering employees make sure their pay reflects what they bring to the table -- not their gender or where they work, where they are originally from or where they now live,” added Bolte. “We’re excited to share this and other research to help individuals have more productive conversations with their employers around salary and pay and, in the end, get what they deserve.” About Paysa  Paysa offers personalized career and hiring recommendations plus real-world salary insights for maximizing opportunity, earning potential and value at all stages of an individual’s career. Using proprietary artificial intelligence technology and machine learning algorithms, Paysa analyzes millions of data points including jobs, resumes and compensation information, providing professionals with actionable tools, insights, and research. They can then see and understand their individual worth in the market today, and how to increase their value. Paysa also empowers enterprises with the knowledge they need to be competitive in today’s fierce tech hiring market. Employers can learn which skills, real-world company experience and educational background offers the greatest predictor of a candidate’s or employee’s future success at their organization.


PALO ALTO, Calif., Feb. 28, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Paysa, the only platform that uses artificial intelligence (AI) to deliver personalized career and hiring recommendations plus real-world salary insights, today announced the results of a new study, revealing the 10 worst cities and companies when it comes to undercompensating their employees (according to market value) by at least 10 percent or more. The study considered base salary, equity and bonus pay. To create this and an earlier study, revealing that more than one-third (nearly two million people) are underpaid by 10 percent or more, Paysa examined more than five million resumes of tech and engineering professionals and found that the pay gap can be significant. Considering that the average salary for a software engineer is $112,000.00, this translates into a minimum of $11,200.00, per person, per year in lost wages. Considering the total number of people underpaid by this amount, as found in the study, this translates into more than $20 billion in lost wages for employees, which these companies kept for their own profits. These lost wages represent a significant negative impact to local economies since these employees did not have this money to spend locally. In addition, per this earlier Paysa research, within the next six months, seven percent of all tech and engineering workers across the U.S. will be due for a promotion with a salary increase of $17,756.00, on average. Where do employees have the greatest likelihood of being undercompensated? According to this latest study, the top five cities are Seattle, Boston, San Francisco, San Jose and Los Angeles and the top five companies are Accenture, Glassdoor, Pinterest, Microsoft and Dropbox. The same study also shows that women in markets across the U.S. are 45 percent likely to be undercompensated while their male counterparts are only 38 percent likely to have the same experience. Overall, the Paysa research shows that younger workers or those with only 0-2 years-of-experience are 42 percent likely to be underpaid, indicating that the more junior an employee is in terms of years-of-experience, the greater propensity they have to be taken advantage of in terms of not getting compensated according to market value. At the same time, those with 2-5 years of experience are 44 percent likely to be undercompensated and employees with 20 years or more under their belts are only 24 percent likely to be affected by a gap in pay. On the flip side, the 10 companies least likely to undercompensate their tech and engineering talent include Intuit, Amazon, WalmartLabs, MZ, Capital One, Yelp, Yahoo!, Qualcomm, Bloomberg LP and Netflix. The full study and report is now available from Paysa. Highlights from the study’s findings include the following. The 10 cities that are most likely to undercompensate their tech and engineering pros and the likelihood of them doing so are: The 10 companies that are most likely to pay their tech and engineering the worst and the likelihood of them doing so include: Employees who think they might be underpaid can benefit from Paysa’s new Get A Raise Tool, which shows them how they are currently doing, in terms of getting paid according to market value and their skills, background and education. The tool also shows employees what they could be getting, available jobs that match their unique profile and offers resources for negotiating a raise with their current employer, if that is the path they want to pursue. “The gap between actual pay and market value can be remarkable – even in top cities and at leading companies,” said Chris Bolte, CEO of Paysa. “Thankfully, the tables are now turning for tech and engineering employees across the board, giving them a level of data transparency that is long overdue in a way that was never before possible. At Paysa, we’re on a mission to make this happen with greater control for the employee.” “Our goal is to help tech and engineering employees make sure their pay reflects what they bring to the table -- not their gender or where they work, where they are originally from or where they now live,” added Bolte. “We’re excited to share this and other research to help individuals have more productive conversations with their employers around salary and pay and, in the end, get what they deserve.” About Paysa  Paysa offers personalized career and hiring recommendations plus real-world salary insights for maximizing opportunity, earning potential and value at all stages of an individual’s career. Using proprietary artificial intelligence technology and machine learning algorithms, Paysa analyzes millions of data points including jobs, resumes and compensation information, providing professionals with actionable tools, insights, and research. They can then see and understand their individual worth in the market today, and how to increase their value. Paysa also empowers enterprises with the knowledge they need to be competitive in today’s fierce tech hiring market. Employers can learn which skills, real-world company experience and educational background offers the greatest predictor of a candidate’s or employee’s future success at their organization.


PALO ALTO, Calif., Feb. 28, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Paysa, the only platform that uses artificial intelligence (AI) to deliver personalized career and hiring recommendations plus real-world salary insights, today announced the results of a new study, revealing the 10 worst cities and companies when it comes to undercompensating their employees (according to market value) by at least 10 percent or more. The study considered base salary, equity and bonus pay. To create this and an earlier study, revealing that more than one-third (nearly two million people) are underpaid by 10 percent or more, Paysa examined more than five million resumes of tech and engineering professionals and found that the pay gap can be significant. Considering that the average salary for a software engineer is $112,000.00, this translates into a minimum of $11,200.00, per person, per year in lost wages. Considering the total number of people underpaid by this amount, as found in the study, this translates into more than $20 billion in lost wages for employees, which these companies kept for their own profits. These lost wages represent a significant negative impact to local economies since these employees did not have this money to spend locally. In addition, per this earlier Paysa research, within the next six months, seven percent of all tech and engineering workers across the U.S. will be due for a promotion with a salary increase of $17,756.00, on average. Where do employees have the greatest likelihood of being undercompensated? According to this latest study, the top five cities are Seattle, Boston, San Francisco, San Jose and Los Angeles and the top five companies are Accenture, Glassdoor, Pinterest, Microsoft and Dropbox. The same study also shows that women in markets across the U.S. are 45 percent likely to be undercompensated while their male counterparts are only 38 percent likely to have the same experience. Overall, the Paysa research shows that younger workers or those with only 0-2 years-of-experience are 42 percent likely to be underpaid, indicating that the more junior an employee is in terms of years-of-experience, the greater propensity they have to be taken advantage of in terms of not getting compensated according to market value. At the same time, those with 2-5 years of experience are 44 percent likely to be undercompensated and employees with 20 years or more under their belts are only 24 percent likely to be affected by a gap in pay. On the flip side, the 10 companies least likely to undercompensate their tech and engineering talent include Intuit, Amazon, WalmartLabs, MZ, Capital One, Yelp, Yahoo!, Qualcomm, Bloomberg LP and Netflix. The full study and report is now available from Paysa. Highlights from the study’s findings include the following. The 10 cities that are most likely to undercompensate their tech and engineering pros and the likelihood of them doing so are: The 10 companies that are most likely to pay their tech and engineering the worst and the likelihood of them doing so include: Employees who think they might be underpaid can benefit from Paysa’s new Get A Raise Tool, which shows them how they are currently doing, in terms of getting paid according to market value and their skills, background and education. The tool also shows employees what they could be getting, available jobs that match their unique profile and offers resources for negotiating a raise with their current employer, if that is the path they want to pursue. “The gap between actual pay and market value can be remarkable – even in top cities and at leading companies,” said Chris Bolte, CEO of Paysa. “Thankfully, the tables are now turning for tech and engineering employees across the board, giving them a level of data transparency that is long overdue in a way that was never before possible. At Paysa, we’re on a mission to make this happen with greater control for the employee.” “Our goal is to help tech and engineering employees make sure their pay reflects what they bring to the table -- not their gender or where they work, where they are originally from or where they now live,” added Bolte. “We’re excited to share this and other research to help individuals have more productive conversations with their employers around salary and pay and, in the end, get what they deserve.” About Paysa  Paysa offers personalized career and hiring recommendations plus real-world salary insights for maximizing opportunity, earning potential and value at all stages of an individual’s career. Using proprietary artificial intelligence technology and machine learning algorithms, Paysa analyzes millions of data points including jobs, resumes and compensation information, providing professionals with actionable tools, insights, and research. They can then see and understand their individual worth in the market today, and how to increase their value. Paysa also empowers enterprises with the knowledge they need to be competitive in today’s fierce tech hiring market. Employers can learn which skills, real-world company experience and educational background offers the greatest predictor of a candidate’s or employee’s future success at their organization.


PALO ALTO, Calif., Feb. 28, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Paysa, the only platform that uses artificial intelligence (AI) to deliver personalized career and hiring recommendations plus real-world salary insights, today announced the results of a new study, revealing the 10 worst cities and companies when it comes to undercompensating their employees (according to market value) by at least 10 percent or more. The study considered base salary, equity and bonus pay. To create this and an earlier study, revealing that more than one-third (nearly two million people) are underpaid by 10 percent or more, Paysa examined more than five million resumes of tech and engineering professionals and found that the pay gap can be significant. Considering that the average salary for a software engineer is $112,000.00, this translates into a minimum of $11,200.00, per person, per year in lost wages. Considering the total number of people underpaid by this amount, as found in the study, this translates into more than $20 billion in lost wages for employees, which these companies kept for their own profits. These lost wages represent a significant negative impact to local economies since these employees did not have this money to spend locally. In addition, per this earlier Paysa research, within the next six months, seven percent of all tech and engineering workers across the U.S. will be due for a promotion with a salary increase of $17,756.00, on average. Where do employees have the greatest likelihood of being undercompensated? According to this latest study, the top five cities are Seattle, Boston, San Francisco, San Jose and Los Angeles and the top five companies are Accenture, Glassdoor, Pinterest, Microsoft and Dropbox. The same study also shows that women in markets across the U.S. are 45 percent likely to be undercompensated while their male counterparts are only 38 percent likely to have the same experience. Overall, the Paysa research shows that younger workers or those with only 0-2 years-of-experience are 42 percent likely to be underpaid, indicating that the more junior an employee is in terms of years-of-experience, the greater propensity they have to be taken advantage of in terms of not getting compensated according to market value. At the same time, those with 2-5 years of experience are 44 percent likely to be undercompensated and employees with 20 years or more under their belts are only 24 percent likely to be affected by a gap in pay. On the flip side, the 10 companies least likely to undercompensate their tech and engineering talent include Intuit, Amazon, WalmartLabs, MZ, Capital One, Yelp, Yahoo!, Qualcomm, Bloomberg LP and Netflix. The full study and report is now available from Paysa. Highlights from the study’s findings include the following. The 10 cities that are most likely to undercompensate their tech and engineering pros and the likelihood of them doing so are: The 10 companies that are most likely to pay their tech and engineering the worst and the likelihood of them doing so include: Employees who think they might be underpaid can benefit from Paysa’s new Get A Raise Tool, which shows them how they are currently doing, in terms of getting paid according to market value and their skills, background and education. The tool also shows employees what they could be getting, available jobs that match their unique profile and offers resources for negotiating a raise with their current employer, if that is the path they want to pursue. “The gap between actual pay and market value can be remarkable – even in top cities and at leading companies,” said Chris Bolte, CEO of Paysa. “Thankfully, the tables are now turning for tech and engineering employees across the board, giving them a level of data transparency that is long overdue in a way that was never before possible. At Paysa, we’re on a mission to make this happen with greater control for the employee.” “Our goal is to help tech and engineering employees make sure their pay reflects what they bring to the table -- not their gender or where they work, where they are originally from or where they now live,” added Bolte. “We’re excited to share this and other research to help individuals have more productive conversations with their employers around salary and pay and, in the end, get what they deserve.” About Paysa  Paysa offers personalized career and hiring recommendations plus real-world salary insights for maximizing opportunity, earning potential and value at all stages of an individual’s career. Using proprietary artificial intelligence technology and machine learning algorithms, Paysa analyzes millions of data points including jobs, resumes and compensation information, providing professionals with actionable tools, insights, and research. They can then see and understand their individual worth in the market today, and how to increase their value. Paysa also empowers enterprises with the knowledge they need to be competitive in today’s fierce tech hiring market. Employers can learn which skills, real-world company experience and educational background offers the greatest predictor of a candidate’s or employee’s future success at their organization.


Arpit Bajpai and Vikrant Raj were in their final year of engineering at IIT Bombay, while Arpit’s schoolmate Anurag Shukla was at SIRT Bhopal. They were all about to graduate, and their batchmates were preparing for interviews, aptitude tests and group discussions to land jobs during placements. The trio were doing the same but they had a dilemma. “Everyone eventually gets a job, but when asked what exactly their job is, then they have just one common answer- ‘we will know about it once we get into the company and start working’,” says Vikrant. The same scenario is also applicable to those who start preparing for B schools and foreign universities. “We find it pretty shocking that even such educated bright minds of our country prepare and train themselves for something which they don’t have any idea about,” says Arpit. The trio believes that career decision-making at every stage is primarily driven by personal networking and it might not always be the best option for everyone. “This premise pointed us to a clear knowledge gap and we decided to fill it. Our driving force was to create a service which we needed at different points of our careers,” says Anurag. Bloomigo came to be on this premise. Bloomigo is a data-and-design-driven intelligent platform, which helps people explore and make better career decisions by doing predictive analysis on career paths already taken by relevant people and their experiences. The company is serving information to answer three basic questions about any career associated point: 1) How to get there? 2) What happens there? 3) What will happen after it? Bloomigo launched in September with trends and insights from 100+ colleges, 800+ companies and more than 400 alumni stories. For instance, if a person is looking for a job at HP, one can raise a query on the company and a skill-set (say business development, C++, Java). Bloomigo mines data from its pool and dishes out all the information related to that position at that particular firm. “We currently have over 2,000 users on board, an average session duration of eight minutes, and an exceptionally low bounce rate of just 25.67 per cent,” says Vikrant. The product is free to use right now and Bloomigo has raised an angel round from Taj Haslani (Valley-based HR tech evangelist), Ankit Gupta (former Google employee and current principal engineer at WalmartLabs) and Ankit Srivastava (IIT-D, IIM-A, currently Roposo). The focus is on product development but for revenue, Bloomigo is looking at the hiring and e-learning spaces and monetising via providing search and discovery of personalised ‘opportunity’ and ‘means to achieve them’. Bloomigo is a product in a space which is still charting out a direction. Jombay is an Indian startup in a similar space; there have been a few efforts like PayScale in India which let users estimate salaries at various companies, and globally there is Glassdoor which is a pioneer in the space. LinkedIn ideally would be a great match for these companies but the tech biggie hasn’t made aggressive progress. The vision for Bloomigo is to create a well-informed community where the decision making is driven by organised data and structured information. “We want to map each and every probable career path on our platform and will consider ourselves successful the day when people start taking the path which will take them to their potential and desired destination,” says Vikrant.


A few decades ago discovering events was difficult and there was no unified platform to search for them. Fast forward to present, technology has made our lives easy and it is now simple for people to discover events around them and also keep up to date with the latest news and developments. But with the sheer volume of content available both online and offline, a new problem has arisen — searching for relevant events among all the clutter. EventsHigh aims to help people with this pain point. What is it? EventsHigh is an event discovery platform that aims to bring all events under one roof and help people find relevant events based on their location, interest and availability. While there are many events discovery platforms in the market, EventsHigh’s USPs include a map and list based UI, recommendations and other personalized features. In a survey they conducted, EventsHigh found that 85% of the participants generally came to know about an event after it had happened and then regretted missing it. So they aim to make event discovery easier and more seamless through their mobile and web based app.The app is functional in Delhi, Mumbai, Bangalore, Pune, Hyderabad, Chennai, Kolkata and two international cities, Singapore and Jakarta. They cover over 20 categories of events some of which include events related to music, technology, comedy, and literature etc. – User Interface: While checking out events under various categories for a particular area, users can opt for either a list or a map-view based on their preference -Users can also keep themselves up to date about events happening ‘today’, ‘tomorrow’ or ‘weekend’ and ‘favourite’ or invite a friend to an event. –Custom feed: Based on the categories users chose and their likes and dislikes they can customize their feeds and see events they may be interested in. –Notifications: Users can set alerts for their interests and the app will send them a notification whenever a relevant event comes up. The event detail page on the app gives users details like venue, time, link to book tickets etc. EventsHigh was started by Nikesh Garera and Arvind Batra, who were part of the Kosmix team in the Bay Area that was later acquired and became WalmartLabs. They developed a strong background in machine learning and big data as a result. Nikesh (CEO) is an alumnus from Carnegie Mellon and Johns Hopkins where he pursued his MS and Ph.D respectively. Arvind (CTO) did his MS from Georgia Tech. Parag Sarda, a ME from Indian Institute of Science, joined them a few months ago. He leads their Android effort and brings his engineering experience from his prior work at Google and WalmartLabs to the table. While Arvind and Nikesh were working at Kosmix, they had a strong yearning to attend the Google I/O event but kept missing out on the announcements and were never able to book tickets for it. So they built a web-based crawler that would notify them when the Google I/O tickets went up for sale. This was how the idea for EventsHigh came about. They realized that there was a need for an event discovery platform and started working on it after moving back to Bangalore recently. They found that most Indian cities had thousands of events happening every week, but as all the information was scattered the onus was on the user to sift through and find what he or she needed. So they developed a product to address this pain point. EventsHigh bagged the second place at Tie Pitchfest San Francisco, first place for their Android app at Startup Launchpad and were among the top 10 startups shortlisted by TiE Bangalore for ‘AnthahPrerna’. They were also selected for the $20K bootstrap track of FBStart mobile app programme. While their mobile app is free to download and use, they have a B2C business model through which they help event organisers get the right leads and reach the right target audience for their events. They have events from over 50,000+ event organizers on their platform and about 100,000+ monthly unique visitors. What we liked? While the content, layout and overall user experience is good, what stands out is the map based UI, which gives users a bird’s eye view of events happening in their area. Users can also pinch and zoom in on events and favourite or invite their friends while still in the map mode. The notifications for various events are a boon for absent minded users. The volume of events and search filters makes event discovery simple and easy. The search bar in the app delivered desired results for different keywords as well. What could be improved? While the app makes event discovery easier, the next step could be to make it more social and let users know if their friends or contacts are attending a particular event or if they have also checked out the details about the same event. Nikesh confirmed that they are working on this and are in the process of adding other new features too. For example, in the future users will be able to see more event attributes such as whether an event is free or ticketed, kid ­friendly or not, parking available at venue etc. With an experienced team and a well-executed product, EventsHigh is a unique app and it is definitely worth trying out if you are interested in discovering and attending events in your city. What do you think about this app, do let us know in the comments. Also do check out other apps under our App Fridays and Pursuit of APPiness series.


News Article | July 29, 2014
Site: www.zdnet.com

Walmart could be on the way to honing its recommendations skills through a new purchase made by its tech R&D group, WalmartLabs. The item in the digital shopping cart is Luvocracy, a three-year-old online community for surfacing product recommendations made by the most persuasive of tastemakers: family, friends and select online influencers. Ben Galbraith, vice president of Global Products at Walmart.com, described Luvocracy in a blog post on Tuesday, highlighting trending and collection features while also suggesting throwback references to the heyday of retail catalogs. "In the retail business, we thrive on these moments — on finding products we think our customers will love and introducing them to each other," said Galbraith. "Whether in pages, pixels, or aisles, facilitating such moments is at the very core of what we at Walmart do." Financial terms of the deal have not been disclosed. WalmartLabs noted that "sixteen highly talented people" will be joining the new parent company. That includes some of the existing leadership at Luvocracy, such as CEO and co-founder Nathan Stoll. But Luvocracy's team page lists a few dozen developers and specialists, some of whom will not be moving over to WalmartLabs for undisclosed reasons. Some of WalmartLabs's previous acquisitions include web developer Torbit , Platform-as-a-Service startup OneOps , and product search and e-commerce outfit Adchemy. Most recently, the division marked its 13th takeover in three years with the purchase of Stylr, a location-based mobile app that allows shoppers to find clothes in nearby stores.


News Article | February 21, 2015
Site: www.economist.com

AT A recent dinner party in Silicon Valley, Schumpeter was chatting with an impressive entrepreneur who was grumbling about how hard it was to find a decent date. The tech types she meets turn out to be too geeky, even for a self-confessed nerd who runs her own computing startup. “The odds are very good,” she explained, “but many of the goods are very odd.” For recruiters trying to hire software whizzes, the odds are poor. A recovering economy in America and an explosion of entrepreneurial activity are driving up demand for tech talent. According to the Bureau of Labour Statistics, the unemployment rate among software developers and engineers was just 2.5% in the fourth quarter of 2014, compared with a national joblessness rate of 5.7%. A global search engine for jobs, Indeed, tracks the ten hardest positions to fill; in the final three months of last year, seven of these were roles related to computer science. It is all reminiscent of the late-1990s dotcom boom. Chunky signing-on bonuses and “precations”—paid vacations before taking up a new position—are being dangled in front of tech folk to tempt them to jump ship. Bidding battles are breaking out, with salaries and bonuses rising fast for experts in popular computer languages such as Python and Ruby on Rails. Some programmers are even being wooed for their celebrity potential by talent-management agencies that also represent musicians or sports stars. Look out for the rise of the geek entourage. Although the competition for talent is particularly stiff in Silicon Valley, the phenomenon is a global one. In India, e-commerce giants such as Flipkart and Snapdeal are scrapping for software engineers to help them compete with Amazon there. One of China’s largest internet firms, Baidu, is sponsoring matchmaking events for workers because surveys have shown that married employees are less likely to hop to a rival. In a broad spread of industries, from carmaking to aerospace to domestic appliances, products have ever more lines of code embedded in them. These firms, too, are struggling to hire enough developers. Ford advertises as many jobs in software as many a midsized tech firm. As they seek to serve their customers via smartphone apps, all sorts of service businesses, from banking to retailing, need more people with software skills. If the battle for programming talent is not just being fought among the titans of tech, that is where the front line lies. To a greater extent than makers of hardware, software-based firms are dependent on the hard-to-replicate talent that walks through their doors each morning. Hence the effort they put into recruitment and retention. Tangible rewards in the form of large salaries and attractive share options are part of it. But there is more to their human-resources strategies than generous compensation and perks such as on-site yoga classes and free gourmet meals. Corny as it may sound, tech types really do want to feel they are somehow making “a dent in the universe”, to borrow a phrase from the late Steve Jobs. Grandiose mission statements abound. Google wants to “organise the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful”. Facebook’s goal is to “give people the power to share and make the world more open and connected”. To help foster a sense of boundless possibilities, the firms are also spending heavily on adventurous projects outside their core businesses. Google is working on everything from driverless vehicles to web-connected gadgets for the home. Facebook has bought a company whose drones can provide internet connections to remote swathes of the Earth. And Apple is said to be working on electric cars and virtual-reality headsets. Like other creative types, the best software workers strongly believe that caring means sharing. All-hands meetings are not just for tiny startups; staff at even the largest tech firms expect their bosses to appear frequently in person or by video link, to be grilled about everything from corporate strategy to the quality of the office coffee. The prospect of such radical openness makes buttoned-up executives in other industries quake in their boots. Some hotshot developers still prefer to work in a small firm rather than be just another cog in a giant tech machine. To get their hands on such talent, the big technology firms “acqui-hire” it: they spend lavishly on buying companies with little revenue, just for their staff, and then seek to retain them by offering plenty of autonomy. Last year, for example, Google paid $400m for DeepMind, an artificial-intelligence startup that has some of the best engineers in the field working for it. The web giants are increasingly aware of the need to broaden the talent pool in which they are fishing. Some are making greater efforts to attract and retain female recruits, who are still woefully underrepresented in their ranks. Apple and Facebook have said they will cover the cost of freezing the eggs of female employees who want to delay having a baby while they pursue their careers. Facebook’s chief operating officer, Sheryl Sandberg, has championed the causes of getting more women into executive suites and more female students on to computer-science courses. Other types of companies—even the banks—will struggle to match the Silicon Valley firms in the lavishness of their compensation and their willingness to pamper their software talent. But they can compete for it more effectively by copying some of their techniques. Insurers, for instance, could woo developers by touting their mission of making the world safer from cybercrime and other big risks. Banks and retailers could infuse their ranks with more tech talent via acqui-hires. Indeed, WalmartLabs, the Silicon Valley research arm of Walmart, which faces stiff competition from Amazon, has been busy buying small startups, some of which it has swiftly shut down while keeping the employees. The odds may be stacked against it and other non-tech firms, but the goods are worth fighting for.


News Article | May 6, 2014
Site: searchengineland.com

Adchemy made significant inroads in the product search arena in its short time, powering Google Product Listing Ads for brand name customers such as Macy’s, Overstock.com, Finish Line and Walmart. Today, @WalmartLabs, the retailer’s technology lab based in Silicon Valley, announced it is acquiring Adchemy for an undisclosed sum. Adchemy’s technology takes a semantic search approach to streamlining and scaling product campaigns and moved away from pure keyword-driven targeting. The company designed the Adchemy IntentGraph, a semantic graph containing over 25 million products, their attributes and associated consumer intents. Advertisers could then automate their product feed campaigns to be organized by consumer shopping intent. The Adchemy acquisition marks the twelfth acquisition for @WalmartLabs in the past three years. The retail giant had been late to the e-commerce game, and its initial efforts were clunky — thus the creation of @WalmartLabs three years ago. The Silicon Valley based lab is tasked with making Walmart a tech-driven e-commerce leader globally by building capabilities in-house. “We set forth to recruit, acquire and integrate the best technologies and talent in Silicon Valley,” writes Jeremy King CTO of @WalmartLabs in the announcement VP of Products, Ethan Batraski, formerly the head of search innovation at Yahoo, who has spoken on PLA optimization at SMX conferences (see one of his presentation decks here), Rohit Deep who was the VP of Engineering and was previously the Chief Architect and Engineering Lead at WebEx and data scientist Esteban Arcaute, Head of Research, who holds a PhD from Stanford and also worked at Yahoo will be among the 60 members of the Adchemy team moving over to @WalmartLabs.

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