Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center

Pumpkin Center, NC, United States

Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center

Pumpkin Center, NC, United States

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Spector is Chairman Emeritus of New York College of Health Professions. He is widely recognized as one of the world's most prolific inventors with hundreds of issued patents. He has opened several multi-billion dollar industries with major corporations including Bristol-Myers Squibb which set up a separate division for some of his patents, AMF which launched the first hydraulic exerciser as the world famous Bruce Jenner Exerciser, also called the Muscleworker, as well as products for Mattel, Hasbro, Sun Chemical, Faberge, Remington and numerous other companies. Aside from hundreds of licensed products Spector also developed the first known patents for location based advertising, which was the basis for one of the first Super Apps and now is one of the largest businesses on the Internet. He has donated today's new patent to New York College, under the IP policy of the College. Also known for his ventures into the entertainment industry, Donald Spector partnered with Mitsui & Co. (one of the largest companies in the world), where he helped broker the sale of NBC in the Pacific Rim to Mitsui, as well as introducing QVC to Mitsui , which purchased half the rights of QVC for Japan and other parts of the Pacific Rim. He has been an executive producer on Broadway and president of a major record label, which featured in its format artists such as Elvis Presley, Stevie Wonder, Paul McCartney and Pavarotti. His record label was in partnership with Handleman, at the time the largest audio/video distributor in the United States. Spector attended the Columbia Science Honors Program at the age of 12. He later partnered with Victor Frenkil, the owner of Baltimore Contractors, the builder of part of Baltimore Washington International Airport, the Chesapeake Bay Bridge, the Baltimore Subway system as well as hundreds of other major projects.  He then joined with his cousin the owner of John Henry, the richest horse in racing history to create a conglomerate of consumer product companies. Spector is well known for his work in the fragrance industry, with medical technologies, security systems and computer technologies. Lisa Pamintuan, President of New York College says, "This new technology, added to the College's massive Intellectual Technology Portfolio which includes other donations from Spector, including patents in 3D printing, UV destruction of bacteria, acupressure clothing, as well a breakthrough Hologram Technologies and other technologies, have made our College a major force in Intellectual Property on a world class stage." New York College has signed Memoranda of Understanding with Wake Forest Innovations, the commercialization enterprise of Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center and Wake Forest University, as well as New York Medical College, part of the Touro University System. Chartered by the New York State Board of Regents, New York College of Health Professions, a not-for-profit institution located in Syosset, Long Island, with additional sites in New York City, offers institutionally accredited undergraduate and graduate-level degree programs in Massage Therapy, Acupuncture, Oriental Medicine and Herbal Medicine, and Certificate programs in Holistic Nursing for Registered Nurses and The Science of Self Improvement. New York College maintains a 30-acre modern medical facility in Luo Yang, The People's Republic of China. The College has grown remarkably in the past several years and will continue to develop new educational programs as well as expand into many new areas. For more information about New York College of Health Professions visit www.nycollege.edu or https://www.facebook.com/NewYorkCollegeofHealthProfessions. NEW YORK COLLEGE OF HEALTH PROFESSIONS 6801 Jericho Turnpike Syosset, New York www.NYCollege.edu To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/one-of-the-worlds-most-prolific-inventors-patents-thermometer-that-can-also-diagnose-specific-bacterial-infections-in-the-throat-in-less-than-one-minute-300458767.html


News Article | May 22, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - May 22, 2017 - A new study by researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center has shown that aggressive lowering of blood pressure in people with hypertension reduced the risk of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). This condition, the enlargement and thickening of the walls of the heart's main pumping chamber, is the most common complication of high blood pressure and greatly increases the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. The study is published in the early online edition of the journal Circulation. "We know that high blood pressure could lead to LVH and we know that lowering this pressure to the recommended levels improves it, but we didn't know if intensive lowering of blood pressure beyond recommended would lead to more improvement in heart muscle," said Elsayed z. Soliman, M.D., lead author of the study and director of the epidemiological cardiology research center at Wake Forest School of Medicine, a part of Wake Forest Baptist. The objective of the study was to determine if lowering blood pressure below what is generally recommended would lead to more benefits to the heart muscle in terms of thickening (hypertrophy). And if so, would it also prevent other cardiovascular events. The research team examined these questions through analysis of 8,164 participants from the National Institutes of Health's Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention (SPRINT) trial, which included patients with hypertension but not diabetes. Participants were randomized to the intensive blood pressure lowering group or the standard treatment group. Study findings showed that lowering systolic blood pressure to less than120 mmHg compared to the standard recommendation of 140 mmHg prevented development of new LVH in those without it and caused regression of LVH in those who already had it. "We thought that reducing heart muscle thickening would correlate with fewer heart incidents associated with intensive lowering of high blood pressure, but surprisingly that was not the case," Soliman said. "However, this favorable impact on heart muscle did not explain most of the reduction in cardiovascular events associated with intensive blood pressure lowering. More research is needed to understand what factors determine which patients get the most benefits and less of the harm." These findings provide further evidence of the benefits of the intensive blood pressure lowering in patients with hypertension, and suggest that these benefits go beyond reducing the pressure and stress on the heart structure. Support for the study was provided by the National Institutes of Health (SPRINT) and the Department of Veterans Affairs. Co-authors include: Walter T. Ambrosius, Ph.D., and Zhu-ming Zhang, M.D., of Wake Forest Baptist; William C. Cushman, M.D., Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Memphis; Jeffrey T. Bates, M.D., Michael E. DeBakey VAMC and Baylor College of Medicine; Javier A. Neyra, M.D., University of Kentucky; Thaddeus Y. Carson, M.D., Augusta University; Leonardo Tamariz, M.D., University of Miami; Lama Ghazi, M.D., University of Minnesota; Monique E. Cho, M.D., University of Utah; Brian P. Shapiro, M.D., Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Fla.; Jiang He, M.D., Ph.D., Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine; Lawrence J. Fine, M.D., Dr.PH, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Cora E. Lewis, M.D., University of Alabama at Birmingham.


News Article | May 22, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Doctors want you to get up. They want you to move. Americans are too sedentary, they say -- and fitness is one of the greatest predictors of heart health in middle-aged adults. But are some exercises better than others to keep our hearts healthy? Doctors say yes. And one is recommended more than all the rest: brisk walking. "Walking is remarkably beneficial," says Dr. Walter C. Willett, professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and professor of epidemiology and nutrition at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. "A half-hour a day can make quite a bit of difference. In terms of return for your investment of time, it really is a big bargain." A casual walk won't do it, though; you need to be huffing and puffing a bit. Doctors like other exercises that get our hearts pumping, as well, such as jogging, biking, dancing and swimming. But experts point to walking, in particular, because most healthy people can do it and stick to it, and research shows great benefits. A National Runners' and Walkers' Health Study comparing runners and walkers found that runners who ran an hour a day reduced their risk of heart disease by 4.5 percent, while walkers who used the same amount of calories reduced their risk of heart disease by 9 percent. [See: 17 Ways Heart Health Varies in Women and Men.] Willett says vigorous exercise brings other benefits, including increased athletic ability and fitness. "There is some additional benefit of higher intensity activity, but most of the benefit can be obtained by brisk walking," he says. The American Heart Association recommends exercising at least 30 minutes a day, five days a week. The sweet spot for exercise is hitting your target heart rate, which refers to how fast your heart should be pumping based on your age and resting heart rate. The rule of thumb is to increase heart rate to between 50 and 85 percent of your maximum heart rate. Moderate exercise such as light bicycling or brisk walking gets your heart pumping between 50 and 70 percent of your maximum. During high-intensity exercise such as playing singles tennis, jogging or snow shoveling, your heart pumps between 70 and 85 percent of its maximum. Here's a calculator to help you figure yours out. "You should be challenging yourself a bit," Willett says. Brisk walking, running and other cardio activities are aerobic exercises, which means they increase the body's demand for oxygen, causing faster breathing and heart rate. It's an activity you can generally do while speaking some words, but singing a song would be nearly impossible. When done correctly, it improves the efficiency of the body's cardiovascular system as it absorbs and transports oxygen. Studies show that the greatest gains in survival outcomes are when someone goes from being sedentary to becoming moderately active, according to a study published in the American Heart Association Journals. "Researchers have found that for heart attack patients who participated in a formal exercise program, the death rate is reduced by 20 to 25 percent," the study says. Exercise helps maintain healthy arteries and an ideal weight. People who want to lose weight will likely need to kick up their workout to about an hour a day, says Jonathan Rifkin, an exercise physiologist at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center's cardiac rehabilitation center. For those just starting to get fit, Rifkin recommends walking or another moderate-intensity activity. "If you are able to have a baseline level of fitness, you can have drastic changes in body composition and overall fitness level with not a lot of time required to do that," he says. Perks of walking, Rifkin adds, include that it can be either social or solitary, and when done outdoors, reduces anxiety and depression. But he says that for fitness levels to improve further, people need to push themselves. That's where interval training comes in, meaning short bursts of high intensity. For a brisk walker who is healthy and exercising five days a week, Rifkin adds, try jogging a few minutes during one of those walks a week. Once that becomes comfortable, continue to challenge yourself in small increments so you don't get injured. "If you're able to improve your fitness level, you're going to be a lot better off," Rifkin says. [See: The 12 Best Heart-Healthy Diets.] Strength training is a critical but often overlooked component of cardiovascular health. Exercising with weights or body resistance -- such as sit-ups and push-ups -- is recommended by the American Heart Association twice a week, and Willett says strength training for 5 to 10 minutes several times a week is important. It makes us stronger and actually helps prevent diabetes, which is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, Willett says. He explains that when we exercise our muscles, it reduces their insulin resistance, which is a fundamental problem that leads to prediabetes. He adds that weight training increases metabolism and vascular health. Even if you're not able to exercise the recommended amount each week, any exercise helps. A study in the Journal of American Medical Association analyzed the effects of different kinds of exercise on healthy men and found that running for at least an hour per week showed a 42 percent reduced risk for a heart attack. Vigorous exercise is good, but only after a vigorous warm-up, says Dr. William A. Zoghbi, chair of the department of cardiology at Houston Methodist DeBakey Heart and Vascular Center, and professor of medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College and the Institute of Academic Medicine. Zoghbi encourages his patients to do yoga, stretching and strength training, as well as cardio. "I think about total body, not just the heart," he says. "Do some aerobic exercise. Toning is important, flexibility is important for core body and joints. If the heart is doing well and joints are not, I don't think we're doing well." Zoghbi recommends everyone know their weight, blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar numbers. "It's important to keep the engine running healthy," he says. "We need to look under the hood sometimes." However, if you have a heart condition, always check with your doctor before starting a routine. You can discuss the best exercises for you and what your target heart rate should be during activity. [See: Easy Ways to Get 10,000 Steps per Day.] For people who do not set aside time to exercise, there are small steps that can incorporate movement into daily life, such as going for two 10-minute walks during the day, taking the stairs instead of the elevator or parking at the back of a parking lot and walking up to the door. All exercise is important, experts say, and the hardest step is the first one out the door. Allison Klein is a freelance Health reporter at U.S. News. Her focus is heart health and heart disease. She is an award-winning journalist with more than 20 years of experience writing about health, criminal justice, education and family life in The Washington Post, The Baltimore Sun and The Miami Herald. She is a nutrition enthusiast and a recreational runner on the streets and trails of Washington D.C. You can connect with her on LinkedIn, Twitter or email her at allisonklein18@gmail.com.


News Article | May 25, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - May 25, 2017 - Individuals whose insurance covered the cost of a comprehensive medical weight-loss program had one-year outcomes very similar to those of patients who paid for the treatment out of pocket, according to an observational study conducted at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. The study, published in the June issue of the journal Obesity, reviewed the electronic medical records of 943 people who enrolled in comprehensive, non-surgical weight-loss programs at Wake Forest Baptist's Weight Management Center between January 2013 and June 2015. Of these, 480 had insurance that covered the cost of the program and 463 paid the cost out of pocket. The demographics of these two groups were comparable in terms of gender and ethnicity, but participants covered by insurance on average were slightly younger, had a lower body mass index, and resided in lower per capita neighborhoods. The researchers found that there was no real difference in 12-month weight loss between the two payment groups, with those covered by insurance having a mean weight loss of 13.4 percent compared to 13.6 percent for those who self-paid. Also very similar were the percentages of those who lost 5 percent or more of their baseline weight and the average time spent in the program and the number of clinic visits made. The greatest difference between the two groups was in the dropout rates: 12.7 percent for the covered patients and 17.6 percent for the out-of-pocket payers. "There's a rather pervasive idea that patients who pay more out of pocket for a weight-loss program, who have more 'skin in the game' so to speak, will be more engaged in the treatment and consequently have better outcomes than people whose treatment is covered by insurance," said the study's lead author, Jamy Ard, M.D., co-director of the Weight Management Center at Wake Forest Baptist. "Our data suggest that bearing responsibility for the majority of the treatment cost is not required to achieve engagement and clinically meaningful weight loss in a comprehensive medical weight-loss program." Ard added that further, larger-scale research could help determine how insurance status affects both initial motivation to seek weight-loss treatment and engagement in weight-loss programs. This is especially important as we try to expand coverage for obesity treatment and stem the tide of the obesity epidemic," he said. Co-authors of the study are Matt Emery, M.D., Miranda Cook, M.P.H., Erica Hale, M.S., Annette Frain, R.D., Kristina H. Lewis, M.D., M.P.H., and Eunyong Song, Ph.D., of Wake Forest Baptist.


News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - April 19, 2017 - A closed-loop acoustic stimulation brainwave technology significantly reduced symptoms in people suffering from post-traumatic stress in a small pilot study conducted at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. The study is published in the April 19 online edition of the journal BMC Psychiatry. "The effects of chronic stress are killing people and the medical profession has not yet found an answer for how best to treat them," said Charles H. Tegeler, M.D., professor of neurology at Wake Forest School of Medicine, a part of Wake Forest Baptist. "We believe there is a need for effective, non-invasive, non-drug therapies for symptoms of post-traumatic stress, which is why we conducted this trial." Nineteen volunteers who reported high scores on the Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist, civilian version (PCL-C), a commonly used symptom inventory, were included in this single-site study. Of those, 18 completed an average of 16 sessions over a total of 16.5 days, with eight days of actual visits to the office, Tegeler said. The intervention, high-resolution, relational, resonance-based, electroencephalic mirroring (HIRREM), focused on the brain, which is the organ of central command for managing responses to threat and trauma. Participants received a series of HIRREM sessions in which brain electrical activity was monitored noninvasively at high spectral resolution with software algorithms translating selected brain frequencies into audible tones in real time. Those tones were reflected back to participants via ear buds in as little as four milliseconds, providing the brain an opportunity for self-optimization of its electrical pattern. As a closed-loop neurotechnology, the process did not require any conscious, cognitive activity by the participant, who merely relaxed and listened to the tones. "It's as if the brain can look at itself in an acoustic mirror, recalibrate its patterns towards improved balance and reduced hyperarousal, and can relax," Tegeler said. HIRREM was developed by Brain State Technologies based in Scottsdale, Arizona, and has been licensed to Wake Forest Baptist for collaborative research since 2011. Participants completed the PCL-C, and 12 also had continuous recording of blood pressure and heart rate, before and after the intervention sessions. Changes in temporal lobe high frequency asymmetry were analyzed from baseline assessment through the first four sessions, and again for the last four sessions. Autonomic cardiovascular regulation was evaluated with analysis of heart rate variability and blood pressure modulation before and after the intervention. After the sessions, 89 percent (16 of 18) of the participants reported clinically meaningful decreases in symptoms of post-traumatic stress as indicated by a change of at least 10 points from their baseline PCL-C score, Tegeler said. In the entire study group, the average reduction in the PCL-C score was 24 points. There were no adverse events reported. There is ample scientific evidence that there is some brain asymmetry associated with chronic stress. This study is important because it also showed that there was improved balance in brain pattern activity and significant improvement in the autonomic nervous system function, as measured by heart rate variability and blood pressure modulation. All are relevant to a state of chronic stress, which now seems to affect so many people, Tegeler said. Study limitations included the case series design and the absence of a control group. Additionally, participants were selected based on self-reported symptoms and on the PCL-C score rather than a formal clinical assessment. The study was supported by a grant from The Susanne Marcus Collins Foundation, Inc., to the Department of Neurology at Wake Forest Baptist. Co-authors include: Jared F. Cook, M.A., Catherine L. Tegeler, B.S., Joshua R. Hirsch, B.S.E., Hossam A. Shaltout, Ph.D., Sean L. Simpson, Ph.D., Brian C. Fidali, B.A., of Wake Forest Baptist; and Lee Gerdes and Sung W. Lee, M.D., of Brain State Technologies.


News Article | April 25, 2017
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

People with pre-existing mental health conditions had nearly identical results in weight loss after bariatric surgery as compared to those with no known mental health conditions. Published in Obesity, the scientific journal of The Obesity Society (TOS), this is the first large scale study of its kind to examine the relationship of preoperative mental illness to weight loss and health care use after bariatric surgery. "Many clinicians are hesitant to consider bariatric surgery in the mentally ill population due to the assumption that they will not fare well. This research counters those assumptions, showing no difference, on average, in weight loss in the mentally ill versus non-mentally ill population," said TOS spokesperson Scott Kahan, MD, MPH, FTOS, Director of National Center for Weight and Wellness. "No prior research has evaluated this research question in a large and detailed study group. While all potential surgical patients should receive a thorough evaluation prior to considering surgery, this research suggests that there appears to be no outright reason to deny consideration of bariatric surgery in patients with mental illness who otherwise are good surgical candidates." Researchers reviewed electronic health record (EHR) data from over 8,000 adults with and without mental illness, from several health care systems across the United States in 2012-2013, to study weight loss and health care use patterns after bariatric surgery including post-surgery emergency department visits and hospitalization days. The study divided patients with mental illness into three groups: (1) mild to moderate depression or anxiety, (2) severe depression or anxiety and (3) bipolar, psychosis or schizophrenia spectrum disorders. In the study, groups were compared on weight loss by using generalized estimating equations using B-spline bases, and on all-cause emergency department (ED) visits and hospital days using zero-inflated Poisson and negative binomial regression, up to 2 years after surgery. The results concluded that mental illness was not predictive of differential weight loss up to 2 years after bariatric surgery. "Our findings suggest that this powerful weight loss tool can be equally effective for different groups of patients regardless of pre-existing mental health conditions," said Kristina Henderson Lewis, MD, MPH, SM, Assistant Professor, Department of Epidemiology & Prevention Division of Public Health Sciences at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. Dr. Lewis cautioned that the majority of patients in this study came from systems where patients are psychologically screened prior to surgery, supporting the use of such screening to identify clinically-stable patients. Importantly, patients with pre-operative mental illness were observed to have higher use of the emergency department and hospital after bariatric surgery, a finding that may have clinical implications and requires further study. In an accompanying editorial published in Obesity, James Mitchell, MD, discussed the impact of pre-surgery mental illness on post-surgery weight loss, as well as post-surgery emergency department visits and hospitalization. He pointed out that while more research is needed on this topic, "The most important finding is that those with mental illness, even in its more severe forms, can experience significant weight loss after bariatric procedures that is similar to the weight loss seen in the non-mentally ill patients. The current findings suggest that health care providers need to strongly consider bariatric surgical procedures for their severely obese mentally ill patients who are in a period of relative stability."


News Article | April 20, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - April 20, 2017 - Men who have sex with men (MSM) accounted for two thirds of all new HIV infections in the United States, with 26 percent occurring in Latinos, according to 2014 data. If those rates continue, it is estimated that one in four Latino MSM may be diagnosed with HIV during his lifetime. In an effort to reduce those infection rates, scientists at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, in partnership with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), developed, implemented and evaluated a behavioral intervention program called HOLA en Grupos. "We found that we can prevent HIV infection among a very hard-to-reach and growing population in the South," said the study's principal investigator Scott D. Rhodes, Ph.D., chair of social sciences and health policy and director of the Program in Community Engagement at Wake Forest School of Medicine, part of Wake Forest Baptist. "This is one of the first interventions specifically developed for Latino men and we had a 100 percent retention rate, which is unheard of in biomedical, behavioral and translational research." The findings are published in the April 20 online edition of the American Journal of Public Health. In the study, the researchers evaluated the Spanish language, small-group behavioral HIV prevention program designed to increase condom use and HIV testing - two methods proven to reduce infection - among Latinos who have sex with men. From 2012 to 2015, 304 Latino MSM ages 18 to 55 were recruited in North Carolina and randomized to the four-session HOLA en Grupos intervention or to a general health education intervention. Participants completed structured assessments at baseline and at six-month follow-up. At follow-up, the HOLA participants reported that consistent condom use during sex had increased from 33 percent to 65 percent, as compared to the control group that reported little change. The HOLA group also reported an increase in HIV testing from 32 percent to 80 percent as compared to the control group, which reported no significant change. HOLA participants also reported increased knowledge of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections, condom use skill, sexual communication skills and decreased fatalism, according to the study. "This has significant public health ramifications because we've learned how to reach people at high risk and reduce infection rates," Rhodes said. "We've developed a guide on how to implement the program so it should be easy to replicate in other states." Funding for the study was provided by the CDC. Co-authors are: Jorge Alonzo, J.D., Lilli Mann, M.P.H., Eunyoung Song, Ph.D., Jorge Elias Arellano, Manuel Garcia, Rodrigo Rodriguez-Celedon and Beth A. Reboussin, Ph.D., of Wake Forest Baptist; Amanda E. Tanner, Ph.D., of the University of North Carolina, Greensboro; and Arin Freeman, M.P.H., and Tom Painter, Ph.D., of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.


Even 10 minutes of daily high-intensity physical activity could help some children reduce the risk of developing heart issues and metabolic diseases such as diabetes, according to a new study. The research found that by replacing low-intensity activity with short periods of vigorous exercise could be beneficial for young overweight people who report a higher insulin level in the blood. The international study was carried out by a researcher at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, and it was published in the journal Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise. The research investigated data from 11,588 young people, who took part in 11 International Children's Accelerometry Database studies in European countries, the United States and Brazil. The scientists were especially interested in the records that provided the kids's age, gender, level of physical activity and at least one biomarker. A biomarker is a measurable indicator of a medical condition, and the biomarkers in this study referred to cardiometabolic risks. Among the biomarkers that most interested the researchers, weight circumference, diastolic and systolic blood pressure, cholesterol (both HDL and LDL), insulin, glucose, and triglycerides were the most important indicators of the kids's cardiometabolic states. The relationship between biomarkers and vigorous physical activity was conducted while taking a wide range of factors into consideration, from age and gender, to sedentary time and duration and levels of exercise. The researchers found 32 significant associations out of a possible total number of 360. All these associations were connected to reduced insulin levels and waist circumference. In the context of this study, the relationship between all the other biomarkers and performing high-intensity physical activity was inconsistent. The results of this study point out that replacing large amounts of light physical exercise with small amounts of vigorous physical activity could have better long-term metabolic benefits than moderate physical activity. "Substituting light physical activity with vigorous physical activity was inversely associated with waist circumference and insulin. However, vigorous physical activity was inconsistently related to the remaining biomarkers after controlling for time sedentary and medium physical activity," noted the study. According to the researchers, further studies will focus on incorporating a series of additional variables that could also play an important role, such as data on dietary habits and genetic information. This direction of the study is important, as it could allow the researchers to establish a stronger correlation between different levels of exercise and their impact on cardiometabolic biomarkers among children. According to data provided by the CDC, behavior has an important role in developing obesity among children. "Behaviors that influence excess weight gain include eating high-calorie, low-nutrient foods and beverages, not getting enough physical activity, sedentary activities such as watching television or other screen devices, medication use, and sleep routines," notes a CDC data sheet. At the same time, being physically active and following a healthy diet can significantly reduce a child's risks of becoming obese. Cardiometabolic diseases such as diabetes are associated with obesity, even among younger people. Furthermore, it is recommended for children aged six and higher to do at least 60 minutes of physical exercise every day. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


Schwartz G.G.,Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center
Anti-Cancer Agents in Medicinal Chemistry | Year: 2013

The hypothesis that vitamin D deficiency increases the risk of clinical prostate cancer has stimulated an extensive body of research. Ecologic studies have shown that mortality rates from prostate cancer are inversely correlated with levels of ultraviolet radiation, the principal source of vitamin D. Human prostate cells express receptors for 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D which exerts pleitropic anticancer effects on these cells in vitro and in animal models. Moreover, normal prostate cells synthesize 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D from circulating levels of 25-OHD, whose levels are dependent on exposure to ultraviolet light. Analytic epidemiologic studies of vitamin D and prostate cancer have focused on polymorphisms in the vitamin D receptor (VDR), on serum vitamin D levels, and on solar exposure. A role for VDR polymorphisms in prostate cancer risk and progression is established. Prospective studies of serum 25(OH)D do not support a protective role for higher levels of 25(OH)D on prostate cancer risk overall, but a role for vitamin D deficiency is supported by several studies. Conversely, a growing body of evidence implicates low levels of 25-OHD with an increased risk of fatal prostate cancer. The results of most epidemiologic studies of sunlight exposure are consistent with a protective effect of exposure to ultraviolet radiation. The discrepancy between the results of studies of solar exposure and studies of serum 25-OHD may be related to methodological differences and to uncertainties regarding the critical period for vitamin D exposure. Additionally, both high dietary intake of calcium and high levels of calcium in serum are positively associated with prostate cancer risk. The relationship between serum 25(OH)D levels and risk of prostate cancer may differ by calcium intake. © 2013 Bentham Science Publishers.


McMichael A.J.,Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center
The journal of investigative dermatology. Symposium proceedings / the Society for Investigative Dermatology, Inc. [and] European Society for Dermatological Research | Year: 2013

Alopecia areata (AA) is an autoimmune condition characterized by T cell-mediated attack of the hair follicle. The inciting antigenic stimulus is unknown. A dense perbulbar lymphocytic infiltrate and reproducible immunologic abnormalities are hallmark features of the condition. The cellular infiltrate primarily consists of activated T lymphocytes and antigen-presenting Langerhans cells. The xenon chloride excimer laser emits its total energy at the wavelength of 308 nm and therefore is regarded as a "super-narrowband" UVB light source. Excimer laser treatment is highly effective in psoriasis, another T cell-mediated disorder that shares many immunologic features with AA. The excimer laser is superior in inducing T cell apoptosis in vitro compared with narrowband UVB, with paralleled improved clinical efficacy. The excimer laser has been used successfully in patients with AA. In this context, evaluation of the potential benefit of 308-nm excimer laser therapy in the treatment of AA is clinically warranted. Herein, the use of a common treatment protocol with a specifically designed module to study the outcome of excimer laser treatment on moderate-to-severe scalp AA in adults is described.

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