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Srivastava S.,Chandra Dental College and Hospital | Bodade P.R.,Vyws Dental College And Hospital | Rastogi V.,Mln Medical College
BMJ Case Reports | Year: 2013

Osteoma is a benign tumour consisting of mature bone tissue. It is an uncommon lesion that occurs in the bones of the craniofacial complex. Only a few cases involving the temporomandibular joint have been reported. An osteoma of the left temporomandibular joint causing limited mouth opening in a 22-year-old man with CT findings revealing the unusual possibility in differential diagnosis of trismus. Copyright 2013 BMJ Publishing Group. All rights reserved.


Wankhade A.D.,Vyws Dental College And Hospital
BMJ case reports | Year: 2013

Lateral luxation is defined as the displacement of the tooth in a direction other than axially. The present case report narrates management of laterally luxated primary maxillary central incisor with occlusal interference using an inclined plane fabricated with composite resin. The composite resin inclined plane was successfully used for correction of cross-bite caused due to lateral luxation particularly in delayed presentation of the case to the Pedodontics clinic after traumatic injury with occlusal interference.


Kalele K.P.,Vyws Dental College And Hospital | Patil K.P.,Periodontics and Oral Implantology | Nayyar A.S.,Saraswati Dhanwantari Dental College and Hospital and Post Graduate Research Institute | Sasane R.S.,Terna Dental College and Hospital
Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research | Year: 2016

Introduction: Lymphocytes are often termed to be isomorphic, having a monotonous light microscopic appearance. Morphological aspects of lymphocytes in tissue sections thereby are not routinely taken notice of as their morphology seems to vary only in case of lymphoid malignancies, hematological malignancies apart from certain viral infections. Atypical lymphocytes are the lymphocytes with unusual shape, size or overall structure. These are more commonly known as reactive lymphocytes. The unusual histomorphological feature of these cells include larger size than normal lymphocytes; in some cells the size exceeds even 30 microns. The large size is the result of antigenic stimulation of the cell. Alongwith these, the other rare feature which is recently coming under light is “Cellular Cannibalism” which is defined as a large cell enclosing a slightly smaller one within its cytoplasm. Previously, this feature was noted only in cases of malignant tumors. Aim: The objectives of this study were to determine the proportion of atypical lymphocytes in chronic periapical granulomas and cysts; to determine the proportionate cellular cannibalism in these periapical lesions. Materials and Methods: This was a descriptive, observational study conducted in the Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology and Oral Pathology and Microbiology. Haematoxylin and eosin stained 30 slides of chronic periapical granulomas and 20 slides of cysts reported in the year 2014–15 and the clinical proformas of the patients were retrieved from the files of the Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology and Oral Pathology and Microbiology. These slides were evaluated by 3 experts from the specialization of Oral Pathology and Microbiology to determine the presence of atypical lymphocytes and cellular cannibalism under high power magnification (400X). Results: Out of the 30 slides of chronic periapical granulomas, about 12 slides (40%) revealed presence of atypical lymphocytes. In case of slides of chronic periapical cysts, however, only 4 out of the 20 slides (20%) examined histopathologically showed presence of atypical lymphocytes. An interesting feature of cellular cannibalism was noted in tissues with atypical cells. Cannibalistic cells were present in 12 out of the 30 slides of chronic periapical granulomas (40%). None of the cysts, however, revealed cannibalistic cells (0%). Conclusion: In the present study, we have quoted our observations on the unique cellular composition that was seen in histopathological sections of chronic periapical lesions. As also it was noted that those cases in which atypical cells and cellular cannibalism was evident the lesion clinically showed size more than 5cm. The question arises that whether presence of atypical cells from the tissue sections in these lesions denotes an aggressive clinical behavior and should be given a due consideration in deciding the treatment protocols for such cases to provide an optimum patient care. © 2016, Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research. All rights reserved.


Wankhade A.D.,Vyws Dental College And Hospital | Pandey R.K.,Chhatrapati Shahuji Maharaj Medical University | Singh R.K.,Chhatrapati Shahuji Maharaj Medical University | Naphade M.V.,Vyws Dental College And Hospital
BMJ Case Reports | Year: 2013

Traumatic injuries to primary dentition may result in a wide range of developmental disturbances to succedaneous permanent teeth. The prevalence of morphological disturbances, secondary to dental injuries in the primary dentition, ranges from 12% to 69%. One of the morphological disturbances are crown dilacerations which are defined as the displacement of a portion of the developing crown at an angle to the longitudinal axis of the tooth. The prevalence of crown dilaceration constitutes 3% of the total injuries in developing teeth and is usually because of intrusion or avulsion of their primary predecessors. The present article narrates a case of crown dilaceration of a permanent mandibular right central incisor with open apex and large periradicular pathosis and its endo-aesthetic management with 2 years of follow-up. Copyright 2013 BMJ Publishing Group. All rights reserved.


Wankhade A.D.,Vyws Dental College And Hospital
BMJ case reports | Year: 2013

Traumatic injuries to primary dentition may result in a wide range of developmental disturbances to succedaneous permanent teeth. The prevalence of morphological disturbances, secondary to dental injuries in the primary dentition, ranges from 12% to 69%. One of the morphological disturbances are crown dilacerations which are defined as the displacement of a portion of the developing crown at an angle to the longitudinal axis of the tooth. The prevalence of crown dilaceration constitutes 3% of the total injuries in developing teeth and is usually because of intrusion or avulsion of their primary predecessors. The present article narrates a case of crown dilaceration of a permanent mandibular right central incisor with open apex and large periradicular pathosis and its endo-aesthetic management with 2 years of follow-up.

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