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News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: www.decentralized-energy.com

COGEN Europe has announced its new managing director. Hans Korteweg, a former director of communications and government affairs, EMEA Region, for the Westinghouse Electric Company, has been appointed to the role and is keen to ensure cogeneration receives its due attention as the EU puts together its clean energy package. Commenting on his appointment, Mr. Korteweg said: “Europe's energy policy is at a crossroads. Today’s energy and climate decisions will shape Europe’s energy system for the next decades, thereby determining the future level of greenhouse gas emissions, security of energy supply and the competitiveness of European economies.”   “I look forward to leading COGEN Europe and ensuring that the cogeneration sector continues to have a strong and united voice in Brussels and Europe. The ongoing debate at EU level on the Clean Energy Package is key to ensure a cost-effective and secure energy transition. This is where COGEN Europe can make a meaningful contribution towards establishing a ambitious, yet balanced and predictable legislative framework, creating new opportunities for the sector and rewarding the benefits of cogeneration to save energy, reduce CO2 emissions as well as to boost energy efficiency and competitiveness in Europe”.   COGEN Europe chairman Wouter-Jan van der Wurff, said: “COGEN Europe members are delighted that Hans is joining us at this pivotal time for the cogeneration sector. His breadth of experience will be a key asset to our association in driving forward our ambitions for Combined Heat and Power (CHP) in Europe".   A French-born Dutch-American, Mr Korteweg has a BA in international affairs and politics from Vesalius College - Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Belgium and also an Advanced Management Programme graduate of the IE Business School in Madrid, Spain.


News Article | December 9, 2016
Site: phys.org

The findings—which could apply to other African and Asian primates known as Old World monkeys—suggest that human speech stems mainly from the unique evolution and construction of our brains, and is not linked to vocalization-related anatomical differences between humans and primates, the researchers reported Dec. 9 in the journal Science Advances. Co-corresponding author Asif Ghazanfar, a Princeton University professor of psychology and the Princeton Neuroscience Institute, said that scientists across many disciplines have long debated if—and to what extent—differences between the human and primate vocal anatomy allow people to speak but not monkeys and apes. "Now nobody can say that it's something about the vocal anatomy that keeps monkeys from being able to speak—it has to be something in the brain. Even if this finding only applies to macaque monkeys, it would still debunk the idea that it's the anatomy that limits speech in nonhumans," Ghazanfar said. "Now, the interesting question is, what is it in the human brain that makes it special?" Thore Jon Bergman, an assistant professor of psychology and ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of Michigan, said that the research could help narrow down the origin of human speech. "It looks like mainly neuro-cognitive—as opposed to anatomical—differences contribute to the broader range of sounds we produce relative to other primates," said Bergman, who is familiar with the research but was not involved in it. "An important part of understanding human uniqueness is to know what our relatives do," he said. "This study shows that the anatomical capability to make a variety of sounds, as we do with speech, was present long ago. This is useful for understanding the starting point for the evolution of language." Ghazanfar and his co-authors investigated the range of movements that the primate vocal anatomy could produce. Previous examinations of primate vocal anatomy conducted on cadavers had concluded that monkeys and apes have a very limited range of sounds they could produce relative to humans. Ghazanfar and co-corresponding author Tecumseh Fitch, a professor of cognitive biology at the University of Vienna in Austria, however, used X-ray videos to capture and then trace the movements of the different parts of a macaque's vocal anatomy—such as the tongue, lips and larynx—during a number of orofacial behaviors. These data were converted by coauthor Bart de Boer of the VUB Artificial Intelligence Laboratory in Belgium into a computer model that could predict and simulate a macaque's vocal range based on the physical attributes recorded by X-ray. Human speech stems from a source sound produced by the larynx that is changed by the positions of the vocal anatomy such as the lips and tongue, Ghazanfar said. For example, the same source sound lies behind the words "bat" and "bot" with the facial anatomy generating the different sound we hear. The researchers plugged the source sound of a macaque's grunt call into their computer model of the primate's vocal anatomy. They found that a macaque could produce comprehensible vowel sounds—and even full sentences—with its vocal tract if it had the neural ability to speak. The researchers note, however, that while a macaque would be understandable to the human ear, it would not sound precisely like a human. "This new result tells us that there's still a big mystery concerning where human speech came from," said Laurie Santos, a psychology professor at Yale University who is familiar with the research but had no role in it. The existence of a human-like vocal tract in an old species such as the macaque suggests that more recently evolved species such as chimpanzees—which are closely related to humans—very likely have one as well, Santos said. And if that is true, it could mean that studying the chimpanzee brain could help reveal the neural networks that allow humans to speak while their evolutionary cousins cannot. "The paper opens whole new doors for finding the key to the uniqueness of humans' unparalleled language ability," Santos said. "If a species as old as a macaque has a vocal tract capable of speech, then we really need to find the reason that this didn't translate for later primates into the kind of speech sounds that humans produce," she said. "I think that means we're in for some exciting new answers soon." Because this work shows that macaques express nearly the same range of physical movements as humans during vocalization, primates could be used as models for understanding early human speech development and human speech evolution, Ghazanfar said. "Their value as a model system for studying the parts of the brain that directly control the biomechanics of orofacial movements during speech and other vocal behaviors will increase," Ghazanfar said. "Moreover, it's going to force us to think more carefully about how speech evolved, how our brain is uniquely human and how we can use these model animals in the future to understand what goes wrong when we are unable to speak." Explore further: Monkey lip smacks provide new insights into the evolution of human speech


News Article | December 9, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Monkeys known as macaques possess the vocal anatomy to produce "clearly intelligible" human speech but lack the brain circuitry to do so, according to new research. The findings -- which could apply to other African and Asian primates known as Old World monkeys -- suggest that human speech stems mainly from the unique evolution and construction of our brains, and is not linked to vocalization-related anatomical differences between humans and primates, the researchers reported Dec. 9 in the journal Science Advances. Co-corresponding author Asif Ghazanfar, a Princeton University professor of psychology and the Princeton Neuroscience Institute, said that scientists across many disciplines have long debated if -- and to what extent -- differences between the human and primate vocal anatomy allow people to speak but not monkeys and apes. "Now nobody can say that it's something about the vocal anatomy that keeps monkeys from being able to speak -- it has to be something in the brain. Even if this finding only applies to macaque monkeys, it would still debunk the idea that it's the anatomy that limits speech in nonhumans," Ghazanfar said. "Now, the interesting question is, what is it in the human brain that makes it special?" Thore Jon Bergman, an assistant professor of psychology and ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of Michigan, said that the research could help narrow down the origin of human speech. "It looks like mainly neuro-cognitive -- as opposed to anatomical -- differences contribute to the broader range of sounds we produce relative to other primates," said Bergman, who is familiar with the research but was not involved in it. "An important part of understanding human uniqueness is to know what our relatives do," he said. "This study shows that the anatomical capability to make a variety of sounds, as we do with speech, was present long ago. This is useful for understanding the starting point for the evolution of language." Ghazanfar and his co-authors investigated the range of movements that the primate vocal anatomy could produce. Previous examinations of primate vocal anatomy conducted on cadavers had concluded that monkeys and apes have a very limited range of sounds they could produce relative to humans. Ghazanfar and co-corresponding author Tecumseh Fitch, a professor of cognitive biology at the University of Vienna in Austria, however, used X-ray videos to capture and then trace the movements of the different parts of a macaque's vocal anatomy -- such as the tongue, lips and larynx -- during a number of orofacial behaviors. These data were converted by coauthor Bart de Boer of the VUB Artificial Intelligence Laboratory in Belgium into a computer model that could predict and simulate a macaque's vocal range based on the physical attributes recorded by X-ray. Human speech stems from a source sound produced by the larynx that is changed by the positions of the vocal anatomy such as the lips and tongue, Ghazanfar said. For example, the same source sound lies behind the words "bat" and "bot" with the facial anatomy generating the different sound we hear. The researchers plugged the source sound of a macaque's grunt call into their computer model of the primate's vocal anatomy. They found that a macaque could produce comprehensible vowel sounds -- and even full sentences -- with its vocal tract if it had the neural ability to speak. The researchers note, however, that while a macaque would be understandable to the human ear, it would not sound precisely like a human. "This new result tells us that there's still a big mystery concerning where human speech came from," said Laurie Santos, a psychology professor at Yale University who is familiar with the research but had no role in it. The existence of a human-like vocal tract in an old species such as the macaque suggests that more recently evolved species such as chimpanzees -- which are closely related to humans -- very likely have one as well, Santos said. And if that is true, it could mean that studying the chimpanzee brain could help reveal the neural networks that allow humans to speak while their evolutionary cousins cannot. "The paper opens whole new doors for finding the key to the uniqueness of humans' unparalleled language ability," Santos said. "If a species as old as a macaque has a vocal tract capable of speech, then we really need to find the reason that this didn't translate for later primates into the kind of speech sounds that humans produce," she said. "I think that means we're in for some exciting new answers soon." Because this work shows that macaques express nearly the same range of physical movements as humans during vocalization, primates could be used as models for understanding early human speech development and human speech evolution, Ghazanfar said. "Their value as a model system for studying the parts of the brain that directly control the biomechanics of orofacial movements during speech and other vocal behaviors will increase," Ghazanfar said. "Moreover, it's going to force us to think more carefully about how speech evolved, how our brain is uniquely human and how we can use these model animals in the future to understand what goes wrong when we are unable to speak." The paper, "Monkey vocal tracts are speech-ready," was published Dec. 9 by Science Advances. The work was supported by the National Institutes of Health (grant no. R01NS054898), and a European Research Council Advanced Grant (SOMACCA 230604) and starting grant (ABACUS 283435).


News Article | December 9, 2016
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

Monkeys known as macaques possess the vocal anatomy to produce "clearly intelligible" human speech but lack the brain circuitry to do so, according to new research. The findings -- which could apply to other African and Asian primates known as Old World monkeys -- suggest that human speech stems mainly from the unique evolution and construction of our brains, and is not linked to vocalization-related anatomical differences between humans and primates, the researchers reported Dec. 9 in the journal Science Advances. Co-corresponding author Asif Ghazanfar, a Princeton University professor of psychology and the Princeton Neuroscience Institute, said that scientists across many disciplines have long debated if -- and to what extent -- differences between the human and primate vocal anatomy allow people to speak but not monkeys and apes. "Now nobody can say that it's something about the vocal anatomy that keeps monkeys from being able to speak -- it has to be something in the brain. Even if this finding only applies to macaque monkeys, it would still debunk the idea that it's the anatomy that limits speech in nonhumans," Ghazanfar said. "Now, the interesting question is, what is it in the human brain that makes it special?" Thore Jon Bergman, an assistant professor of psychology and ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of Michigan, said that the research could help narrow down the origin of human speech. "It looks like mainly neuro-cognitive -- as opposed to anatomical -- differences contribute to the broader range of sounds we produce relative to other primates," said Bergman, who is familiar with the research but was not involved in it. "An important part of understanding human uniqueness is to know what our relatives do," he said. "This study shows that the anatomical capability to make a variety of sounds, as we do with speech, was present long ago. This is useful for understanding the starting point for the evolution of language." Ghazanfar and his co-authors investigated the range of movements that the primate vocal anatomy could produce. Previous examinations of primate vocal anatomy conducted on cadavers had concluded that monkeys and apes have a very limited range of sounds they could produce relative to humans. Ghazanfar and co-corresponding author Tecumseh Fitch, a professor of cognitive biology at the University of Vienna in Austria, however, used X-ray videos to capture and then trace the movements of the different parts of a macaque's vocal anatomy -- such as the tongue, lips and larynx -- during a number of orofacial behaviors. These data were converted by coauthor Bart de Boer of the VUB Artificial Intelligence Laboratory in Belgium into a computer model that could predict and simulate a macaque's vocal range based on the physical attributes recorded by X-ray. Human speech stems from a source sound produced by the larynx that is changed by the positions of the vocal anatomy such as the lips and tongue, Ghazanfar said. For example, the same source sound lies behind the words "bat" and "bot" with the facial anatomy generating the different sound we hear. The researchers plugged the source sound of a macaque's grunt call into their computer model of the primate's vocal anatomy. They found that a macaque could produce comprehensible vowel sounds -- and even full sentences -- with its vocal tract if it had the neural ability to speak. The researchers note, however, that while a macaque would be understandable to the human ear, it would not sound precisely like a human. "This new result tells us that there's still a big mystery concerning where human speech came from," said Laurie Santos, a psychology professor at Yale University who is familiar with the research but had no role in it. The existence of a human-like vocal tract in an old species such as the macaque suggests that more recently evolved species such as chimpanzees -- which are closely related to humans -- very likely have one as well, Santos said. And if that is true, it could mean that studying the chimpanzee brain could help reveal the neural networks that allow humans to speak while their evolutionary cousins cannot. "The paper opens whole new doors for finding the key to the uniqueness of humans' unparalleled language ability," Santos said. "If a species as old as a macaque has a vocal tract capable of speech, then we really need to find the reason that this didn't translate for later primates into the kind of speech sounds that humans produce," she said. "I think that means we're in for some exciting new answers soon." Because this work shows that macaques express nearly the same range of physical movements as humans during vocalization, primates could be used as models for understanding early human speech development and human speech evolution, Ghazanfar said. "Their value as a model system for studying the parts of the brain that directly control the biomechanics of orofacial movements during speech and other vocal behaviors will increase," Ghazanfar said. "Moreover, it's going to force us to think more carefully about how speech evolved, how our brain is uniquely human and how we can use these model animals in the future to understand what goes wrong when we are unable to speak."


SUWANEE, GA / ACCESSWIRE / December 15, 2016 / SANUWAVE Health, Inc. (OTC QB: SNWV) is pleased to announce that the Company, in partnership with Ortho-Medico, a member of B&Co, Herzele, Belgium, is sponsoring continuing clinical investigation on diabetic foot ulcers (DFU). This trial is expected to begin in January 2017, and will be conducted by the VUB (Free University of Brussels) and UZ Brussel (University Hospital). Earlier work in 2015 at this hospital found that DFU patients, treated in-home with dermaPACE system, responded positively to the treatment. This trial will take the home-care procedures, used in a limited basis, and extend them to a randomized, controlled trial of 100 subjects. The intent of this trial is to compare the effectiveness of in-home treatment of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) using dermaPACE as compared to in-home treatment of DFUs using standard of care only. This trial will help to provide evidence that dermaPACE can be used outside the clinical setting and in essence increase the potential for expanded sales in Europe. Ortho-Medico has long been SANUWAVE's partner in the European Union. With their strength, experience, and knowledge of the orthopedics and wound care market, they are well positioned to help expand SANUWAVE's market penetration via increased clinical presence and to continue to promote the Company's core products, dermaPACE, and orthoPACE systems. Commenting on today's announcement, Kevin A. Richardson II, SANUWAVE's Chairman of the Board, said, "We are very excited about this opportunity to investigate the use of dermaPACE in the home environment. We are equally excited that this opportunity is the first of many that SANUWAVE will partner with Ortho-Medico to help expand the clinical evidence associated with the use of dermaPACE system on diabetic foot ulcers." Added Jo Schops, General Manager of Ortho-Medico, "Our company has long been a proponent of dermaPACE and orthoPACE and this clinical trial will help to show the strong efficacy exhibited by the use of dermaPACE on DFU's. We are pleased to be partnering with SANUWAVE and the combined strength of our two companies will only help to expand market penetration in the European Union." SANUWAVE Health, Inc. (www.sanuwave.com) is a shock wave technology company initially focused on the development and commercialization of patented noninvasive, biological response activating devices for the repair and regeneration of skin, musculoskeletal tissue and vascular structures. SANUWAVE's portfolio of regenerative medicine products and product candidates activate biologic signaling and angiogenic responses, producing new vascularization and microcirculatory improvement, which helps restore the body's normal healing processes and regeneration. SANUWAVE applies its patented PACE technology in wound healing, orthopedic/spine, plastic/cosmetic and cardiac conditions. Its lead product candidate for the global wound care market, dermaPACE®, is CE Marked throughout Europe and has device license approval for the treatment of the skin and subcutaneous soft tissue in Canada, Australia and New Zealand. In the U.S., dermaPACE is currently under the FDA's Premarket Approval (PMA) review process for the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. SANUWAVE researches, designs, manufactures, markets, and services its products worldwide, and believes it has demonstrated that its technology is safe and effective in stimulating healing in chronic conditions of the foot (plantar fasciitis) and the elbow (lateral epicondylitis) through its U.S. Class III PMA approved OssaTron® device, as well as stimulating bone and chronic tendonitis regeneration in the musculoskeletal environment through the utilization of its OssaTron, Evotron®, and orthoPACE® devices in Europe, Asia, and Asia/Pacific. In addition, there are license/partnership opportunities for SANUWAVE's shock wave technology for non-medical uses, including energy, water, food and industrial markets. Ortho-Medico has been a known player in the Benelux since 1987 with its full range of orthopedic aids and specific treatments as Shockwave. Ortho-Medico's final aim, its mission, is to keep the patient as dynamic and active as possible, therefor our innovative expansion in the field of wound care and neurology. Ortho-Medico's success is founded on a very high-quality, complete product portfolio, very close collaboration with specialists and orthopedic technicians, very quick terms of delivery, reliable advice and an attitude which is aimed at finding solutions. This press release may contain "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, such as statements relating to financial results and plans for future business development activities, and are thus prospective. Forward-looking statements include all statements that are not statements of historical fact regarding intent, belief or current expectations of the Company, its directors or its officers. Investors are cautioned that any such forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance and involve risks and uncertainties, many of which are beyond the Company's ability to control. Actual results may differ materially from those projected in the forward-looking statements. Among the key risks, assumptions and factors that may affect operating results, performance and financial condition are risks associated with the regulatory approval and marketing of the Company's product candidates and products, unproven pre-clinical and clinical development activities, regulatory oversight, the Company's ability to manage its capital resource issues, competition, and the other factors discussed in detail in the Company's periodic filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. The Company undertakes no obligation to update any forward-looking statement. For additional information about the Company, visit www.sanuwave.com. SUWANEE, GA / ACCESSWIRE / December 15, 2016 / SANUWAVE Health, Inc. (OTC QB: SNWV) is pleased to announce that the Company, in partnership with Ortho-Medico, a member of B&Co, Herzele, Belgium, is sponsoring continuing clinical investigation on diabetic foot ulcers (DFU). This trial is expected to begin in January 2017, and will be conducted by the VUB (Free University of Brussels) and UZ Brussel (University Hospital). Earlier work in 2015 at this hospital found that DFU patients, treated in-home with dermaPACE system, responded positively to the treatment. This trial will take the home-care procedures, used in a limited basis, and extend them to a randomized, controlled trial of 100 subjects. The intent of this trial is to compare the effectiveness of in-home treatment of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) using dermaPACE as compared to in-home treatment of DFUs using standard of care only. This trial will help to provide evidence that dermaPACE can be used outside the clinical setting and in essence increase the potential for expanded sales in Europe. Ortho-Medico has long been SANUWAVE's partner in the European Union. With their strength, experience, and knowledge of the orthopedics and wound care market, they are well positioned to help expand SANUWAVE's market penetration via increased clinical presence and to continue to promote the Company's core products, dermaPACE, and orthoPACE systems. Commenting on today's announcement, Kevin A. Richardson II, SANUWAVE's Chairman of the Board, said, "We are very excited about this opportunity to investigate the use of dermaPACE in the home environment. We are equally excited that this opportunity is the first of many that SANUWAVE will partner with Ortho-Medico to help expand the clinical evidence associated with the use of dermaPACE system on diabetic foot ulcers." Added Jo Schops, General Manager of Ortho-Medico, "Our company has long been a proponent of dermaPACE and orthoPACE and this clinical trial will help to show the strong efficacy exhibited by the use of dermaPACE on DFU's. We are pleased to be partnering with SANUWAVE and the combined strength of our two companies will only help to expand market penetration in the European Union." SANUWAVE Health, Inc. (www.sanuwave.com) is a shock wave technology company initially focused on the development and commercialization of patented noninvasive, biological response activating devices for the repair and regeneration of skin, musculoskeletal tissue and vascular structures. SANUWAVE's portfolio of regenerative medicine products and product candidates activate biologic signaling and angiogenic responses, producing new vascularization and microcirculatory improvement, which helps restore the body's normal healing processes and regeneration. SANUWAVE applies its patented PACE technology in wound healing, orthopedic/spine, plastic/cosmetic and cardiac conditions. Its lead product candidate for the global wound care market, dermaPACE®, is CE Marked throughout Europe and has device license approval for the treatment of the skin and subcutaneous soft tissue in Canada, Australia and New Zealand. In the U.S., dermaPACE is currently under the FDA's Premarket Approval (PMA) review process for the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers. SANUWAVE researches, designs, manufactures, markets, and services its products worldwide, and believes it has demonstrated that its technology is safe and effective in stimulating healing in chronic conditions of the foot (plantar fasciitis) and the elbow (lateral epicondylitis) through its U.S. Class III PMA approved OssaTron® device, as well as stimulating bone and chronic tendonitis regeneration in the musculoskeletal environment through the utilization of its OssaTron, Evotron®, and orthoPACE® devices in Europe, Asia, and Asia/Pacific. In addition, there are license/partnership opportunities for SANUWAVE's shock wave technology for non-medical uses, including energy, water, food and industrial markets. Ortho-Medico has been a known player in the Benelux since 1987 with its full range of orthopedic aids and specific treatments as Shockwave. Ortho-Medico's final aim, its mission, is to keep the patient as dynamic and active as possible, therefor our innovative expansion in the field of wound care and neurology. Ortho-Medico's success is founded on a very high-quality, complete product portfolio, very close collaboration with specialists and orthopedic technicians, very quick terms of delivery, reliable advice and an attitude which is aimed at finding solutions. This press release may contain "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, such as statements relating to financial results and plans for future business development activities, and are thus prospective. Forward-looking statements include all statements that are not statements of historical fact regarding intent, belief or current expectations of the Company, its directors or its officers. Investors are cautioned that any such forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance and involve risks and uncertainties, many of which are beyond the Company's ability to control. Actual results may differ materially from those projected in the forward-looking statements. Among the key risks, assumptions and factors that may affect operating results, performance and financial condition are risks associated with the regulatory approval and marketing of the Company's product candidates and products, unproven pre-clinical and clinical development activities, regulatory oversight, the Company's ability to manage its capital resource issues, competition, and the other factors discussed in detail in the Company's periodic filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. The Company undertakes no obligation to update any forward-looking statement. For additional information about the Company, visit www.sanuwave.com.


News Article | December 8, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

Oslo (Norway) and Niel (Belgium), 8 December 2016 - PCI Biotech (OSE: PCIB), a cancer focused biopharmaceutical company, and eTheRNA immunotherapies NV, a VUB spin-off company backed by strong life science investors to continue the development of mRNA-based immunotherapies, today announced that they are initiating a preclinical research collaboration. The partnership is governed by a preclinical research collaboration agreement. In brief, the collaborators will evaluate technology compatibility and synergy based on in vivo studies. The companies will evaluate results achieved from this research collaboration and then explore the potential for a further partnership. Please see attached press release for further details. This information is subject to the disclosure requirements pursuant to section 5-12 of the Norwegian Securities Trading Act.


News Article | November 30, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Brain scientists are using tropical fish to investigate how the spinal cord can be coaxed to repair itself after injury. The European research team has received £1.1 million (€1.3m) to investigate how zebrafish are able to repair and replace damaged nerve cells. Researchers will explore how these mechanisms can be triggered in other animals and human cells. They hope their findings will reveal new therapies that could be tested in patients with neurodegenerative conditions, such as motor neuron disease and multiple sclerosis. Such treatments could also help people with certain types of paralysis. The spinal cord carries vital connections between the brain and muscles called motor neurons, which are crucial for controlling movement of the body. Damage to these fragile nerve cells - either by injury or disease - is permanent and results in irreversible paralysis. Zebrafish have the remarkable ability to repair injured connections and replace damaged motor neurons, enabling them to regain full movement within four weeks after injury. They are also able to repair the specialised sheath that surrounds nerve cells - called myelin - which helps speed up the transmission of nerve impulses that control movement. The team - coordinated by the University of Edinburgh - includes brain experts from the French National Institute of Health and Medical Research (Inserm), University Hospital Dresden, DFG Centre for Regenerative Therapies Dresden, the Free University of Brussels (VUB) and the Nencki Institute of Experimental Biology of the Polish Academy of Sciences. Researchers are developing specialised microscope techniques to monitor the mechanisms of nerve cell repair in action. They hope to identify the molecular signals that instruct stem cells in the zebrafish's spinal cord to produce new motor neurons and stimulate repair of the myelin sheath. These factors will then be examined in further animal studies and laboratory tests on human cells. At the end of the three-year study, the researchers hope to identify potential therapies that can be taken forward into clinical trials involving patients with neurodegenerative diseases. The study is funded by the European Commission through the European Research Area Network for Neuroscience Research (ERA-NET NEURON) and co-funded through national funding agencies. Lead researcher Professor Catherina Becker, Director of the University of Edinburgh's Centre for Neuroregeneration, said: "This exciting project brings together leading experts from across Europe to explore the intrinsic capacity of the spinal cord to repair itself. We hope this will eventually lead to urgently needed therapies for people who have damage to their spinal cord, either from disease or injury."


News Article | November 9, 2016
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

Enzymes called kinases manage a wide range of cell processes, from metabolism, cell signaling, nutrient transport, and many others. Because they can affect so many different cell activities, kinases are tightly regulated within cells to make sure that the enzymes only act when necessary. Improperly activated kinases are linked to illnesses such as cancer and Alzheimer's disease. A group of scientists from VIB, Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB) and Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB) led by Prof. Tom Lenaerts (VUB-ULB) and prof. Nico van Nuland (VIB-VUB) has uncovered a new mechanism for controlling the activation of a kinase implicated in Alzheimer's disease, generating novel insights into how to control this protein's activity. The research was published in the high-profile journal Structure, a Cell Press periodical. To make sure that the activities of kinase proteins are well-managed, proteins have evolved different methods to toggle them on and off by disrupting their interactions on a molecular level. Side chains are chemical groups directly attached to a protein's main chain or backbone that affect both the shape and function of a protein. In their new research on the activation of a specific enzyme called Fyn, Prof. Lenaerts and his team were able to identify the specific toggling mechanism that this protein uses to ensure its own regulation, revealing for the first time the role that side chains play in the process. Their observations may be important to the development of Alzheimer-treatment therapies, as Fyn interacts with the protein Tau, which has been identified as a cause of the disease. How cells switch their enzymes on and off Just like the thermostats in our homes, which turn the heat on and off based on temperature changes, changes in the interactions between the modules defining protein structures activate and deactivate kinases. Using both experimental and predictive techniques, the multidisciplinary team uncovered a network of communicating protein residues inside cells that control Fyn's activation. Research has shown that toggling off Fyn in mice with Alzheimer's disease reduces memory problems in these mice. Prof. Tom Lenaerts (VUB-ULB) said, "The insights presented by our research may provide important mechanistic knowledge of kinase regulatory systems, which could be used to develop new drugs that regulate Fyn's activity in Alzheimer's patients." This research is especially poignant to the Belgian scientific community, as Prof. Nico van Nuland, co-author and a pioneer in this research field, was diagnosed only a few years ago with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). He has been fighting this disease with courage and optimism, providing crucial support to the entire research team. He possesses expert knowledge of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, which was crucial in the reported research. "Without his contributions, these results would have never been realized," says Prof. Lenaerts.


News Article | February 3, 2016
Site: phys.org

Due to the tremendous growth of mobile data traffic, display and audio applications, new spectral resources in the mm-wave frequency bands are needed to support user demand for high data rates. One way to realize this is through mm-wave wireless networks based on small outdoor cells featuring beamforming, a signal processing technique using phased antenna arrays for directional transmission or reception. The beamforming steers the radiation in the desired direction while achieving a good link budget that supports high spectral efficiency. Imec's and VUB's 60GHz transceiver architecture features direct conversion and analog baseband beamforming with four antennas. The architecture is inherently simple and is not affected by image frequency interference. Moreover, a 24GHz phase-locked loop that subharmonically locks a 60GHz quadrature oscillator is inherently immune to the pulling disturbance of the 60GHz power amplifier. The prototype transceiver chip (7,9mm2), implemented in 28nm CMOS, integrates a four-antenna array. The chip was validated with a IEEE 802.11ad standard wireless link of 1m. The transmitter consumes 670mW and the receiver 431mW at 0.9V power supply. The transmitter-to-receiver EVM was better than -20dB in all the four WiGig frequency channels (58.32, 60.48, 62.64 and 64.8 GHz), with a transmitter equivalent isotropic radiated power (EIRP) of 24dBm. This allows for QPSK as well as 16QAM modulations according to the IEEE 802.11ad standard, achieving very high data rates up to 4.62 Gbps. Interested companies are invited to join imec's 60 GHz R&D as a research partner and benefit from collaboration in imec's Industrial Affiliation Program, development-on-demand, academic partnerships, or access to the technology for further development through licensing programs.


At this week's IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC2016), nanoelectronics research center imec and Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB) presented a self-calibrated high-speed (10Mbits/s) phase modulator achieving an excellent Error Vector Magnitude (EVM) of -37dB at 10.25 GHz. The modulator is based on a l analog fractional subsampling PLL featuring a world leading -246.6dB Figure of Merit (FOM). It is an attractive solution for phase modulation in highly efficient polar transmitters. Radio frequency synthesizers are ubiquitous building blocks of today's ever growing networking solutions. Whether for high throughput applications like LTE-Advanced or for sub-mW Internet-of-Things nodes, the phase noise of the RF synthesizer sets a limit to the achievable data rate or to the total radio power consumption, as one can often be traded for the other. On top of that, for efficient spectrum usage, the new standards typically involve higher order modulation schemes. Polar transmitters, using efficient nonlinear power amplifiers might be a good option, but they need highly accurate phase modulators. The PLL is built around an analog-based subsampling high-gain phase detector, which enables low-noise operation. The advanced 28nm CMOS technology is exploited to enhance its performance through innovative built-in background self-calibration that corrects all non-idealities of the analog building blocks. Together, these technique ensure a state-of-the-art noise performance resulting in only 176fsec jitter. Similarly, digital phase modulation is implemented, with quasi-ideal performance thanks to background calibration of all non-idealities. Combined with the intrinsic low noise of the PLL, a record EVM better than -37dB is achieved at 10GHz carrier. These results were presented at ISSCC2016 as paper 9.7 in the High performance wireless session: "N. Markulic et al.; A Self-Calibrated 10Mb/s Phase Modulator with -37.4dB EVM Based on a 10.1-to-12.4GHz, -246.6dB-FOM, Fractional-N Subsampling PLL."

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