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News Article | May 19, 2017
Site: www.scientificcomputing.com

The HumanTool project being led by VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland involves the testing of new indoor temperature control concepts for adjusting spaces to individual needs. Energy is saved when unused rooms can be left unheated or uncooled. The final result of the project will be a completely new product. We spend around 90% of our time indoors. Our experience of thermal sensation is important to productivity and comfort, and is mainly affected by a room's temperature level. The HumanTool project aims to enhance the comfort level of indoor temperatures, which affects the thermal comfort, health and well-being of a facility's users. Begun last autumn, the project will involve the practical testing and development of a smart temperature control concept in hospital and office conditions during two heating and cooling seasons. The first pilot sites will be VTT's main office, Digitalo, in Espoo, the Seinäjoki Central Hospital and Kuopio University Hospital. In the hospitals, testing will begin in office premises and then proceed to patient facilities. The experiences of various end-users of the rooms, such as staff and patients, will be gathered. "We will use the Human Thermal Model (HTM) method developed by VTT. We will evaluate the thermal sensations of various user groups, which will be taken into account in the design of comfortable and energy-efficient buildings. Because digital solutions for facility monitoring are now cost-efficient, we will use the latest technology for temperature control," says project manager Pekka Tuomaala of VTT. The results will be ready at the end of 2018 and can be applied in places such as offices, hospitals, hotels, schools and in vehicles. VTT is coordinating the HumanTool project, which began in October 2016. The project sponsors and partners are VTT, the Seinäjoki Central Hospital, Kuopio University Hospital, Senate Properties, Siemens, Uponor, Granlund, Mecastep and New Nordic Engineering.


News Article | May 19, 2017
Site: www.scientificcomputing.com

The HumanTool project being led by VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland involves the testing of new indoor temperature control concepts for adjusting spaces to individual needs. Energy is saved when unused rooms can be left unheated or uncooled. The final result of the project will be a completely new product. We spend around 90% of our time indoors. Our experience of thermal sensation is important to productivity and comfort, and is mainly affected by a room's temperature level. The HumanTool project aims to enhance the comfort level of indoor temperatures, which affects the thermal comfort, health and well-being of a facility's users. Begun last autumn, the project will involve the practical testing and development of a smart temperature control concept in hospital and office conditions during two heating and cooling seasons. The first pilot sites will be VTT's main office, Digitalo, in Espoo, the Seinäjoki Central Hospital and Kuopio University Hospital. In the hospitals, testing will begin in office premises and then proceed to patient facilities. The experiences of various end-users of the rooms, such as staff and patients, will be gathered. "We will use the Human Thermal Model (HTM) method developed by VTT. We will evaluate the thermal sensations of various user groups, which will be taken into account in the design of comfortable and energy-efficient buildings. Because digital solutions for facility monitoring are now cost-efficient, we will use the latest technology for temperature control," says project manager Pekka Tuomaala of VTT. The results will be ready at the end of 2018 and can be applied in places such as offices, hospitals, hotels, schools and in vehicles. VTT is coordinating the HumanTool project, which began in October 2016. The project sponsors and partners are VTT, the Seinäjoki Central Hospital, Kuopio University Hospital, Senate Properties, Siemens, Uponor, Granlund, Mecastep and New Nordic Engineering.


News Article | May 16, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

The joint European project PROGRESS, which is being led by VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, is developing new utilizations models based on the circular economy. The aim is to increase the recovery and reuse of steel components from demolished buildings, which can be used in the new construction projects. The EU is contributing EUR 1 million in funding to the project. The construction and demolition sector creates Europe's largest waste flow and new measures are needed to increase the reuse and recovery of wastes. In order to achieve this, it will be increasingly important to understand at the design stage how to deconstruct buildings to enable the use of their durable components in new applications. Due to begin in June, the PROGRESS project will develop new design tools, methods and recommendations with focus on the economic and environmental aspects. The goal is to increase the amount of reused steel components in buildings by assisting the demolition and planning of steel structures with the aim of decrease virgin raw material use. Hence, energy use in manufacturing of new building structures can be reduced. In addition, existing opportunities and obstacles of reusing components will be identified. The results will benefit the entire construction industry, manufacturers, designers and contractors. New business opportunities are foreseen as recycled components and raw materials become an increasingly easy and cost-efficient option for the entire construction sector value chain. The environmental load, material costs and energy consumption will be reduced at the same time. As an initial step the PROGRESS project will focus on single-storey steel buildings, a large number of which are used by the industrial, retail, warehousing, sports and exhibition sectors. The project, which will start in June 2017 and continue until May 2020, has a budget of EUR 1.6 million, EUR 1 million of which is being contributed by the EU. The project is led by VTT from Finland. The project partners are Ruukki Construction (Finland), Steel Construction Institute (United Kingdom), the RWTH Aachen University and Paul Kamrath Ingenieurrückbau (Germany), Universitatea Politehnica Timi?oara (Romania) and ECCS, European Convention for Constructional Steelwork (Belgium). VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd is the leading research and technology company in the Nordic countries. We use our research and knowledge to provide expert services for our domestic and international customers and partners, and for both private and public sectors. We use 4,000,000 hours of brainpower a year to develop new technological solutions. VTT in social media: Twitter @VTTFinland, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, Instagram and Periscope.


News Article | May 17, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Available to industry for the first time: New computation tools enable much faster and cheaper product development Faster, more accurate and agile computation tools and methods have been developed through the SEMTEC project, led by VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland. This will enable the elimination of the expensive and time-consuming prototype phase in the electromechanical industry. Finnish industry will gain a competitive advantage due to the faster product development of electrical motors, generators and transformers, which will enter the markets at lower cost. The project will also result in quieter and more energy-efficient machines. The key result of the SEMTEC project is new computation methods, which can now be exploited by industry for the first time, using companies' own tools. The project produced innovative and accurate methods to control vibrations, dampen noise and improve the energy efficiency of devices. Beneficiaries of the results include the electromechanical industry in particular, which manufactures electric motors, generators and transformers. In addition, cooperation between research and industry will increase when all results are available to everyone via the open-source Elmer software. "Finnish industry will gain a competitive advantage from leaner design processes. Electromechanical devices are seldom mass-produced -- each product unit tends to be separately designed. Accelerating product development will therefore markedly shorten delivery times and create a major competitive edge," says project manager Janne Keränen of VTT. For example, the noise generated by lifts and transformers will be reduced. This will enable the reducing of disturbing and tiresome noise in homes and workplaces. "SEMTEC has led to close and symbiotic cooperation between industrial enterprises, research institutes and universities. Open source code means that new models developed by researchers can be tested immediately in the industry's own design systems. The project has enabled the productisation of new, world-class modelling toolset, which we have already been using to win major deals," says Eelis Takala, Lead Research Specialist at Trafotek. As computing power grows and the use of open source software increases, electromagnetic computation is reaching a turning point. Old software is seldom suitable for the world of parallel computing. The Elmer tool, an open-source finite element method (FEM) software developed by CSC, was used in the project. Elmer features numerically efficient parallel computing and advanced coupling of multiple phenomena. "Only genuine cooperation enabled the development of software for a new application area so quickly. The importance of parallel computing will continue to grow as number of computational cores in CPUs increases. This leads us to believe that long and fruitful cooperation lies ahead," says Peter Råback of CSC, Product Manager of the Elmer software. The project began in February 2015 and will end in May 2017. The following companies are participants: ABB Oy, Kone Corporation, Konecranes Finland Corporation, Trafotek Oy, Sulzer Pumps Finland Oy, Ingersoll-Rand Finland Oy and CSC - IT Center for Science (CSC). The research organisations involved were VTT, Aalto University, Lappeenranta University of Technology and Tampere University of Technology. The SEMTEC project was funded by Tekes and the companies and research institutes participating in the project. SEMTEC final, open seminar will be held in Aalto University on Tuesday 23 May 2017. For further details on the project, go to http://www. . More information about the project: VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd is the leading research and technology company in the Nordic countries. We use our research and knowledge to provide expert services for our domestic and international customers and partners, and for both private and public sectors. We use 4,000,000 hours of brainpower a year to develop new technological solutions. VTT in social media: Twitter @VTTFinland, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, Instagram and Periscope.


According to Zion Research, "global demand for the flexible electronics market was valued at $5.13 billion in 2015 and is expected to generate revenue of $16.5 billion by 2021, growing at a CAGR of slightly above 21 percent between 2016 and 2021." Key elements of the market include flex displays, sensors, batteries, and memory. Applications also abound in the automotive, consumer electronics, healthcare, and industrial sectors. While technology advancement and accelerating to manufacturing are the primary themes of the FLEX Conference, applications and business trends are highlighted on the opening day: Sessions are planned for FHE manufacturing, standards and reliability, substrates, conductors, inspection, encapsulation and coating, nanoparticle inks, direct write, and 3D printing, among others. Well-known companies will present, such as Molex, Panasonic, Eastman Chemical, and Northrup Grumman, as well as leading universities, and the U.S. Army and U.S. Air Force Research Laboratories. Among the R&D organizations presenting at 2017FLEX are CEA-LITEN (France), ETRI (South Korea), Flexible Electronics & Display Center (USA), Fraunhofer Institute (Germany), Holst Center (Netherlands), National Research Council (Canada), PARC (USA), and VTT (Finland). Topics of the presentations range from new forms of flexible substrates to TFT and OLED pilot lines to printed health monitoring sensors. The exhibit floor, short courses and networking opportunities round out the event, as well as many member-only meetings. FlexTech, the Nano-Bio Manufacturing Consortium (NBMC) and NextFlex hold member and planning meetings for the governing councils, technical councils and technology working groups. Initiatives in manufacturing, mobile power, e-health, as well as project proposals will be discussed, all buoyed by the information shared during the technical conference. For more information on 2017FLEX, please visit:  www.semi.org/en/2017-flex SEMI® connects nearly 2,000 member companies and 250,000 professionals worldwide annually to advance the technology and business of electronics manufacturing. SEMI members are responsible for the innovations in materials, design, equipment, software, and services that enable smarter, faster, more powerful, and more affordable electronic products. Since 1970, SEMI has built connections that have helped its members grow, create new markets, and address common industry challenges together. SEMI maintains offices in Bangalore, Beijing, Berlin, Brussels, Grenoble, Hsinchu, Seoul, Shanghai, Silicon Valley (Milpitas, Calif.), Singapore, Tokyo, and Washington, D.C.  For more information, visit www.semi.org and follow SEMI on LinkedIn  and Twitter. FlexTech, a SEMI Strategic Association Partner, is focused on growth, profitability, and success throughout the manufacturing and distribution chain of flexible hybrid electronics, by developing solutions for advancing these technologies from R&D to commercialization. Visit FlexTech at www.flextech.org and follow FlexTech on LinkedIn and Twitter.


News Article | May 18, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Marilyn, the first automated car to be granted a road traffic testing permit in Finland, and its spouse Martti have taken things to a new level together and started exchanging information with each other and their driving environment. They will take the next step in their relationship in the autumn, when the public digital infrastructure can also talk with the couple. The automated cars developed by VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland can hear, see and sense, and Finnish intelligence hums in their brains. They are able to follow a pre-programmed route and avoid collisions with sudden obstacles without input from the driver. The cars currently require the lane markings or sides of the road to be visible. This is, however, only the first step; by 2020, the cars will be driving in more demanding conditions on roads covered in gravel and snow. "Our cars already have enough equipment required for automated driving, and now we are taking the most out of them with software technology. The challenges range from small to big ones, but that's fascinating," says project manager Matti Kutila from VTT. The autonomous cars feature a thermal camera for observing people and animals; a stereo camera and radar for high-resolution scanning of the vicinity; laser scanners and long-range radars for seeing farther; and GPS/Glonass receivers for positioning. The cars also have inertia units for determining direction and accelerations. The actuators are cylinders and motors. The sensors and actuators are connected by intelligence that creates a situational awareness and controls the actuators so that the car moves as planned at an accuracy of milliseconds and centimetres. "The communications channel of the automated cars is open, but the messages are not yet fully compliant with the standards. Come autumn, the cars will exchange information in a standard format, also allowing others to talk with them," says Kutila. "Big things will be seen in 2021" According to Kutila, the next step for VTT's automated cars will be changing the wavelengths of the optical components, increasing the resolution of the radar, and building more intelligence in the software monitoring the capabilities of the sensors. These are intended to do their part in tackling demanding weather conditions such as a slippery road surface, concealed edge of the road or fog. Different scenarios are added step by step in the development of the autonomous cars (such as cities, main roads, snow, exit ramps) that the car can manage, while increasing the driving speed and managing difficult driving conditions with improved intelligence. "Today, the automation of traffic is generally speaking just taking its first steps - the big things will not come until 2021 and later. This is a kind of a 'never ending story'. It is certain that the number of code lines in cars will grow explosively in the coming years - today, we are talking about maybe 3,000 lines in our cases," says Kutila. Autonomy will also be introduced into lorries and buses and even ships, but in a different form. Working machines, however, are marching in the front lines of the development of autonomy. Their working areas can be limited, which makes autonomous operation easier. In traffic, creating such limits is not as easy. Safety and cybersecurity threats will be increasingly involved when the IoT for vehicles, or Internet of Things, and information networks advance. A lot of work is still required to develop a car that operates completely reliably and observes its environment. "What the cars have today has not been built in six months; it is a result of over 20 years of work," says Kutila. VTT the Technical Research Centre of Finland also co-operates with global brands such as Daimler, Renault, Autoliv, Cerema, EICT, Hitachi, Ibeo, Innoluce, Technical University of Tampere, University of Ulm, Xenics, Oplatek, Vaisala and Modulight in the ECSEL co-funded initiative called DENSE. Finnish partners involved in the national TEKES co-funded project called UrbanAutoTest include LinkMotion, Tieto, TTS, Taipale Telematics, City of Tampere, Trafi and Here. VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd is the leading research and technology company in the Nordic countries. We use our research and knowledge to provide expert services for our domestic and international customers and partners, and for both private and public sectors. We use 4,000,000 hours of brainpower a year to develop new technological solutions. VTT in social media: Twitter @VTTFinland, Facebook, LinkedIn, YouTube, Instagram and Periscope.


16th Annual Conference and Exhibit is More Comprehensive and Global MILPITAS, Calif., May 16, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- FlexTech's annual Flexible Electronics Conference and Exhibit – 2017FLEX – is set for the Hyatt Regency Hotel & Spa in Monterey, Calif. from June 19-22, 2017. Consistently attracting 500+ registrants, the event is the premier technology conference for the emerging flexible electronics industry. Twenty-six sessions will cover the landscape of flexible hybrid electronics and printed electronics, including R&D, manufacturing and applications. Short courses and networking events round out 2017FLEX. According to Zion Research, "global demand for the flexible electronics market was valued at $5.13 billion in 2015 and is expected to generate revenue of $16.5 billion by 2021, growing at a CAGR of slightly above 21 percent between 2016 and 2021." Key elements of the market include flex displays, sensors, batteries, and memory. Applications also abound in the automotive, consumer electronics, healthcare, and industrial sectors. While technology advancement and accelerating to manufacturing are the primary themes of the FLEX Conference, applications and business trends are highlighted on the opening day: Sessions are planned for FHE manufacturing, standards and reliability, substrates, conductors, inspection, encapsulation and coating, nanoparticle inks, direct write, and 3D printing, among others. Well-known companies will present, such as Molex, Panasonic, Eastman Chemical, and Northrup Grumman, as well as leading universities, and the U.S. Army and U.S. Air Force Research Laboratories. Among the R&D organizations presenting at 2017FLEX are CEA-LITEN (France), ETRI (South Korea), Flexible Electronics & Display Center (USA), Fraunhofer Institute (Germany), Holst Center (Netherlands), National Research Council (Canada), PARC (USA), and VTT (Finland). Topics of the presentations range from new forms of flexible substrates to TFT and OLED pilot lines to printed health monitoring sensors. The exhibit floor, short courses and networking opportunities round out the event, as well as many member-only meetings. FlexTech, the Nano-Bio Manufacturing Consortium (NBMC) and NextFlex hold member and planning meetings for the governing councils, technical councils and technology working groups. Initiatives in manufacturing, mobile power, e-health, as well as project proposals will be discussed, all buoyed by the information shared during the technical conference. For more information on 2017FLEX, please visit:  www.semi.org/en/2017-flex SEMI® connects nearly 2,000 member companies and 250,000 professionals worldwide annually to advance the technology and business of electronics manufacturing. SEMI members are responsible for the innovations in materials, design, equipment, software, and services that enable smarter, faster, more powerful, and more affordable electronic products. Since 1970, SEMI has built connections that have helped its members grow, create new markets, and address common industry challenges together. SEMI maintains offices in Bangalore, Beijing, Berlin, Brussels, Grenoble, Hsinchu, Seoul, Shanghai, Silicon Valley (Milpitas, Calif.), Singapore, Tokyo, and Washington, D.C.  For more information, visit www.semi.org and follow SEMI on LinkedIn  and Twitter. FlexTech, a SEMI Strategic Association Partner, is focused on growth, profitability, and success throughout the manufacturing and distribution chain of flexible hybrid electronics, by developing solutions for advancing these technologies from R&D to commercialization. Visit FlexTech at www.flextech.org and follow FlexTech on LinkedIn and Twitter.

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