Brussels, Belgium

Vrije Universiteit Brussel

www.vub.ac.be/en
Brussels, Belgium

The Vrije Universiteit Brussel About this sound listen is a Dutch-speaking university located in Brussels, Belgium. It has three campuses referred to as Etterbeek, Jette and Kaai .The university's name is sometimes abbreviated by "VUB" or translated to "Free University of Brussels". However, it is an official policy of the university not to use abbreviations or translations of its name, because of possible confusion with another university that has the same translated name: the French-speaking Université Libre de Bruxelles.In fact, the Vrije Universiteit Brussel was formed by the splitting in 1970 of the same Université Libre de Bruxelles, which was founded in 1834 by the Flemish-Brussels lawyer Pierre-Théodore Verhaegen. He wanted to establish a university independent from state and church, where academic freedom would be prevalent. This is today still reflected in the university's motto Scientia vincere tenebras, or Conquering darkness by science, and in its more recent slogan Redelijk eigenzinnig , or Reasonably opinionated. Accordingly, the university is pluralistic — it is open to all students on the basis of equality regardless of their ideological, political, cultural or social background – and it is managed using democratic structures, which means that all members – from students to faculty – participate in the decision-making processes.The university is organised into 8 faculties that accomplish the three central missions of the university: education, research, and service to the community. The faculties cover a broad range of fields of knowledge including the natural science, classics, life science, social science, humanities, and engineering. The university provides bachelor, master, and doctoral education to about 8,000 undergraduate and 1,000 graduate students. It is also a strongly research-oriented institute, which has led to its top-189th position among universities worldwide. Its research articles are on average more cited than articles by any other Flemish university. Wikipedia.

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Patent
Vrije Universiteit Brussel | Date: 2017-04-26

A micro-reactor system for contacting fluids is described. The system comprises a first microfluidic channel structure for guiding a first fluid to at least one output nozzle thus generating a first sub-flow, a second microfluidic channel structure for guiding a second fluid to at least a second output nozzle thus generating a second sub-flow, said first output nozzle being aligned with said second output nozzle and arranged for contacting the first sub-flow and the second sub-flow. The micro-reactor comprises at least a third microfluidic channel structure for at least a third,inert,fluid generating at least a third sub-flow arranged to be positioned adjacent at least the first and/or the second sub- flows so as to act as a wall between said first and/or second sub-flows.


With the current invention, we provide new methods of enhancing the T-cell stimulatory capacity of human dendritic cells (DCs) and their use in cancer vaccination. The method comprises the introduction of different molecular adjuvants to human DCs through transfection with at least two mRNA or DNA molecules encoding markers selected from the group of: CD40L, CD70, constitutively active TLR4 (caTLR4), IL-12p70, EL-selectin, CCR7 and/or 4-1 BBL; or in combination with inhibition of SOCS, A20, PD-L1 and/or STAT3 expression, for example through siRNA transfection. We could show a clear increase in the immunostimulatory capacity of DCs obtained in this way, enabling them to elicit an unexpectedly high T-cell immune response in vitro. Introduction of at least two of the above molecules, in combination with a tumor-specific antigen enables the DCs to elicit a significant host-mediated T-cell immune response in vivo against the tumor antigen and thus makes them very attractive in the manufacturing of anti-cancer vaccines.


Patent
Vib Vzw, Vrije Universiteit Brussel and Stanford University | Date: 2017-01-18

The present invention relates to the field of GPCR structure biology and signaling. In particular, the present invention relates to protein binding domains directed against or capable of specifically binding to a functional conformational state of a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). More specifically, the present invention provides protein binding domains that are capable of increasing the stability of a functional conformational state of a GPCR, in particular, increasing the stability of a GPCR in its active conformational state. The protein binding domains of the present invention can be used as a tool for the structural and functional characterization of G-protein-coupled receptors bound to various natural and synthetic ligands, as well as for screening and drug discovery efforts targeting GPCRs. Moreover, the invention also encompasses the diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic usefulness of these protein binding domains for GPCR-related diseases.


Patent
Vrije Universiteit Brussel | Date: 2017-01-18

A chromatographic column assembly (2) is described, comprising a channel as the chromatographic column (12) and a vortex flow inducer (5). The channel (12) comprises an inlet (13) for receiving a sample liquid and an outlet (14), and is adapted for separating the sample liquid into components when the sample liquid flows through the channel in an axial direction from the inlet to the outlet. The vortex flow inducer (5) is adapted for inducing, when the sample fluid is flowing through the channel, a motion (19) of the sample liquid in the channel in a plane substantially orthogonal to the axial direction (A).


Patent
Vrije Universiteit Brussel | Date: 2017-03-29

The present invention relates to an optical system comprising a zoom lens system with at least two lenses and means for moving said at least two lenses with respect to one another in a given direction so that a plurality of energy or irradiance distributions of the received light can be generated, whereby at least one of said lenses has at least one freeform shaped optical surface.


Telecommunications device comprising: an electrical-balance duplexer, EBD, circuit coupled to at least one output node of a transmit path (TXin), an antenna, and at least one input node of a receive path (RXout), the EBD circuit being configured to isolate the transmit path from the receive path by signal cancellation, and a balancing network (Zbal) as part of the EBD circuit. The balancing network is an integrated tunable impedance network configured to provide an impedance that matches a target impedance (Zant) associated with the antenna at a first frequency and simultaneously at a second, different frequency. The network comprises a first portion and a second portion, the first portion reducing the influence of the tuning of the second portion at the first frequency. The network preferably comprises no explicit resistors.


Patent
Vrije Universiteit Brussel and The General Hospital Corporation | Date: 2017-03-22

The invention relates to polynucleotides suitable for reducing or eliminating the expression of expanded repeat RNA (CUGexp) of the dystrophy myotonic-protein kinase (DMPK) gene in a cell of a DM-1 patient. The polynucleotides are a combination of a polynucleotide for a site specific nuclease targeting the dystrophy myotonic- protein kinase (DMPK) gene locus, and a donor polynucleotide having 5 and 3 regions which are homologous with the sequence of DMPK gene which flank the target site of the nuclease. The invention further relate to in vivo and in vitro methods to reduce or eliminate CTG repeats in the DMPK gene. The invention further relates to the medical use of polynucleotides and cells for treating DM-1 patient.


Patent
Vrije Universiteit Brussel | Date: 2017-04-12

The invention in general relates to human hepatic 3D co-culture models, more in particular 3D spheroid co-cultures of human hepatocyte-like cells and hepatic stellate cells. Furthermore, the invention provides a method for obtaining such co-cultures, as well as the use of said co-cultures in the identification of pro-fibrotic and/or anti-fibrotic compounds.


Patent
Vrije Universiteit Brussel and M2Wave Bvba | Date: 2017-04-19

A sensor for sensing a reflection property of a material, the sensor comprising an electromagnetic radiation input means for creating or receiving an electromagnetic radiation signal, a resonator for influencing the electromagnetic radiation input signal, a material holder for holding the material under test, a delay line positioned between the resonance filter and the material holder such that the electromagnetic radiation travels in the delay line after passing the resonance filter and prior to reaching the material under test, when it is positioned in the material holder, and a detection means for detecting a signal reflected by the material under test.


Muyldermans S.,Vrije Universiteit Brussel
Annual Review of Biochemistry | Year: 2013

Sera of camelids contain both conventional heterotetrameric antibodies and unique functional heavy (H)-chain antibodies (HCAbs). The H chain of these homodimeric antibodies consists of one antigen-binding domain, the VHH, and two constant domains. HCAbs fail to incorporate light (L) chains owing to the deletion of the first constant domain and a reshaped surface at the VHH side, which normally associates with L chains in conventional antibodies. The genetic elements composing HCAbs have been identified, but the in vivo generation of these antibodies from their dedicated genes into antigen-specific and affinity-matured bona fide antibodies remains largely underinvestigated. However, the facile identification of antigen-specific VHHs and their beneficial biochemical and economic properties (size, affinity, specificity, stability, production cost) supported by multiple crystal structures have encouraged antibody engineering of these single-domain antibodies for use as a research tool and in biotechnology and medicine. © 2013 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.

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