Vobra Special Petfoods BV

Veghel, Netherlands

Vobra Special Petfoods BV

Veghel, Netherlands

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Beynen A.C.,Vobra Special Petfoods BV | Saris D.H.J.,Vobra Special Petfoods BV | de Jong L.,Van Hall Larenstein University of Applied Sciences | Staats M.,Van Hall Larenstein University of Applied Sciences | Einerhand A.W.C.,Innovation Center
American Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences | Year: 2011

Problem statement: Osteoarthritis is an inflammatory joint disease associated with loss of cartilage matrix. There is suggestive evidence that the intake of polydextrose fiber has anti-inflammatory activity. It was reasoned that polydextrose may have a positive influence on canine osteoarthritis. Approach: A double-blind, placebo-controlled trial with privately owned dogs was carried out to assess the efficacy of STA-LITE® polydextrose in the treatment of osteoarthritis. With the use of a questionnaire, five clinical signs were evaluated by the owners. For a period of 8 weeks, the dogs received a complete dry food without or with 3% polydextrose. There were 16 control and 19 test dogs. Results: The baseline values of the clinical scores for swelling of joints, stiffness and lameness indicated that the severity of osteoarthritis was much less in the test dogs than in the controls. The initial scores for activity and pain were similar in the two groups. Comparing the changes in clinical scores over time between control and test dogs would be biased by the difference in baseline severity of osteoarthritis. On strict terms, a maximum number of pairs of matched control and test dogs was formed for each clinical sign. It was found that all five clinical signs showed more group-mean improvement in the dogs fed the diet containing polydextrose than in those given the control diet. The difference between the pooled group-mean changes of the control and test dogs was statistically significant. As an overall index of the improvement of osteoarthritis, the sum of the changes for the five clinical variables was calculated. Polydextrose was found to induce a marked improvement of osteoarthritis: The polydextrose-mediated increase in the osteoarthritis improvement index was 57%. Conclusion: Polydextrose can be considered safe and it is suggested that a dose of 3% in a dry food would be beneficial for dogs with osteoarthritis. © 2011 Science Publications.


Beynen A.C.,Sudan University of Science and Technology | Beynen A.C.,Vobra Special Petfoods BV | Saris D.H.J.,Vobra Special Petfoods BV | van Altena F.,Van Hall Larenstein University of Applied Sciences | And 4 more authors.
American Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences | Year: 2011

Problem statement: There was evidence that beta-1,3/1,6-glucans modulate inflammatory activity. In an open, non-controlled trial, purified beta-1,3/1,6-glucans were found to improve the clinical signs of dogs with undefined chronic skin disorders. Given the design of that study, further work was required on the efficacy of beta-1,3/1,6-glucans in the treatment of canine atopy. Approach: The influence of a purified preparation of beta-1,3/1,6-glucans (MacroGard ®) on canine atopy was assessed in a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Privately owned dogs were used and the clinical signs of atopic dermatitis were evaluated by the owners. For a period of 8 weeks, the dogs daily received a complete dry food without (n = 16) or with 800 ppm beta-1,3/1,6-glucans (n = 15). During the trial, all dogs were treated three times with the use of a flea remedy in order to exclude any influence of flea-bite allergy. To assess the severity of atopic dermatitis, the clinical signs scored were itching, redness, scaling, thickening and stripping of skin. Results: For all five clinical signs, the group-mean improvement, expressed as change of severity score over time, was greater in the test group than in the controls. Within each group, the changes for the five clinical signs were added up to 1arrive at an overall index of improvement of atopic dermatitis. The extra improvement caused by the ingestion of beta-1,3/1,6-glucans was 63%. The difference between the pooled group-mean changes of the scores for the control and test dogs was statistically significant (P<0.001). To correct for the differences in baseline scores, dose equivalents required for the observed change between baseline and final scores were calculated. It was found that the dose equivalents for the combined placebo and treatment effects seen in the test group were much greater than those required for the placebo effect in the control group. Conclusion: Beta-1,3/1,6-glucans can be considered safe and it is put forward that a dose of 800 ppm in a dry food is beneficial for dogs with atopic dermatitis. © 2011 Science Publications.


Beynen A.C.,Vobra Special Petfoods BV | Legerstee E.,Van Hall Larenstein University of Applied Sciences
American Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences | Year: 2010

Problem statement: There are indications for a beneficial effect of beta-1,3/1,6-glucans on the clinical signs of dogs with osteoarthritis. Data from a controlled trial were necessary to prove or disprove the indications. Approach: A double-blind, placebo-controlled trial with privately owned dogs was carried out to assess the efficacy of a preparation of beta-1,3/1,6-glucans in the treatment of osteoarthritis. With the use of a questionnaire, the clinical signs were evaluated by the owners. For a period of 8 weeks, the test dogs daily received a complete dry food without or with 800 ppm beta- 1,3/1,6-glucans. There were 23 dogs per experimental group. Results: When compared with the baseline values, the administration of beta-1,3/1,6-glucans significantly improved activity (vitality) and significantly reduced stiffness, lameness and pain. In the placebo group there only was a significant change in the clinical signs of stiffness. When the changes over time for the two groups were compared, there were no statistically significant differences, but the test group showed greater numerical improvement as to the scores for activity, stiffness, lameness and pain. Conclusion: Beta- 1,3/1,6-glucans can be considered safe and it is suggested that a dose of 800 ppm in a dry food would be beneficial for dogs with osteoarthritis. © 2010 Science Publications.


Beynen A.C.,Vobra Special Petfoods BV | Middelkoop J.,University of Applied science Den Boschs | Saris D.H.J.,Vobra Special Petfoods BV
American Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences | Year: 2011

Problem statement: The intake of cellulose may delay gastric emptying and raise the intestinal transit rate. These effects could antagonize hairball formation. Thus, it was hypothesized that a diet enriched with a cellulose preparation (Arbocel BWW40®), forming a completely insoluble fiber network, would diminish the severity of clinical symptoms of hairballs in cats. Approach: In a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial with parallel design, 24 privately owned cats were used and the clinical signs were evaluated by the owners. For a period of four weeks, the cats (n = 12 per treatment group) consumed a complete dry food without or with 4% (w/w) cellulose. During the test period, the control or test diet was the only source of nutrition. The trial questionnaire was in the form of a booklet in which each day the occurrence of hairball symptoms (vomiting, retching and coughing) were recorded by the owners. Results: When compared with the control diet, the feeding of the diet with added cellulose lowered the total incidence of vomiting, retching and coughing by 79, 91 and 70%, respectively. The cellulose-induced decrease in vomiting was statistically significant. It is suggested that cellulose ingestion had caused delayed gastric emptying, leading to binding of single strands of hair to food particles so that more hair is transferred into the duodenum. The cellulose-mediated increase in transit rate of digesta may subsequently promote the excretion of hairs with the feces. Conclusion: This study shows that a diet fortified with cellulose reduced the severity of clinical signs in cats with existing hairballs, but the diet may also be effective in the prevention of hairball development. © 2011 Science Publications.


Beynen A.C.,Vobra Special Petfoods BV | van Geene H.W.,Robert Bosch GmbH | Grim H.V.,Robert Bosch GmbH | Jacobs P.,Robert Bosch GmbH | van der Vlerk T.,Robert Bosch GmbH
American Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences | Year: 2010

Problem statement: There are indications that the intake of gelatin hydrolysate has a beneficial impact on the clinical signs of osteoarthritis in dogs. Data from a controlled trial were required to substantiate these indications. Approach: A double-blind, placebo-controlled trial with privately owned dogs was carried out to assess the efficacy of a preparation of gelatin hydrolysate in the treatment of osteoarthritis. With the use of a questionnaire, the clinical signs were evaluated by the owners. For a period of 8 weeks, the test dogs daily received 10 g of gelatin hydrolysate; as a placebo, soya protein isolate was used. The supplements were mixed with the diet; all dogs were fed on the same dry food. There were 15 dogs per treatment group. Results: The administration of gelatin hydrolysate significantly improved activity (vitality) and significantly reduced stiffness and lameness. Conclusion: Gelatin hydrolysate is commonly used as a component of human foods and is generally considered as safe. It is suggested that a dose of about 2.5% in a dry food would be beneficial for dogs with osteoarthritis. © 2010 Science Publications.

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