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Coulter M.M.,University of Toronto | Dinglasan J.A.,Vive Nano | Goh J.B.,University of Toronto | Goh J.B.,Vive Nano | And 3 more authors.
Chemical Science | Year: 2010

A counterion-induced polyelectrolyte collapse strategy has been developed for the preparation of poly(acrylic acid) stabilized palladium nanoparticles (NP-Pd-PAA). The structure and composition of the nanoparticles were investigated via transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, powder X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. NP-Pd-PAA catalyzed fully aqueous Suzuki coupling reactions at loadings as low as 0.01 mol% Pd. © The Royal Society of Chemistry.


Peters R.,McMaster University | Goh J.B.,Vive Nano | Dinglasan J.,Vive Nano | Thakur A.,McMaster University | And 3 more authors.
ECS Transactions | Year: 2010

Because of their superior photostability and fluorescence quantum yield, quantum dots are of great interest for biological applications. Unfortunately, most commercial quantum dots require a surfactant solubilizing layer to disperse in aqueous media. This significantly increases their effective diameter and limits their appeal for single molecule studies. Thus Carboxylate capped CdTe nanoparticles, which are water soluble, represent an attractive solution. We used fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to characterize the properties of these quantum dots. Our study confirms that they have small ∼ 10 nm hydrodynamic radii. It also confirms that they undergo an excitation intensity dependent blinking process characterized by a power law distribution of "on" and "off" dwell times. This power law breaks down at dwell times on the order of ∼10 μs. ©The Electrochemical Society.


Dinglasan J.A.,Vive Nano
Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.) | Year: 2011

Scientists constantly generate great ideas in the laboratory and, as most of us were meant to believe, we should publish or perish. After all, what use is a great scientific idea if it is not shared with the rest of the scientific community? What some scientists forget is that a good idea can be worth something - sometimes it can be worth a lot (of money)! What do you do if you believe that your idea has some commercial potential? How do you turn this idea into a business? This chapter gives the aspiring scientific entrepreneur some (hopefully) valuable advice on topics like choosing the right people for your management team, determining inventorship of the technology and ownership shares in the new company, protecting your intellectual property, and others; finally, it describes some of the various pitfalls you may encounter when commercializing an early stage technology and instructions on how to avoid them.


The present invention provides a composition including a polymer nanoparticle and at least one agricultural active compound incorporated with the nanoparticle, wherein the nanoparticle are less than 100 nm in diameter, and the polymer includes a polyelectrolyte.


Patent
Vive Nano | Date: 2011-06-17

A method for producing a composite nanoparticle, including the steps of, collapsing at least a portion of a polyelectrolyte polymer in solution about one or more precursor moieties to form a composite precursor moiety having a mean diameter in the range between about 1 nm and about 100 nm, wherein the polyelectrolyte polymer has an extended conformation in a first solution state and a more compact conformation in a second solution state; and cross-linking the polyelectrolyte polymer of the composite precursor moiety to form a composite nanoparticle wherein the precursory moiety is a charged organic ion.


Patent
Vive Nano | Date: 2011-06-17

A composite nanoparticle comprising a nanoparticle confined within a cross-linked collapsed polyelectrolyte polymer wherein the nanoparticle comprises a charged organic ion.


Patent
Vive Nano | Date: 2011-06-17

A method for producing a composite nanoparticle, including the steps of: changing the conformation of a dissolved polyelectrolyte polymer from a first extended conformation to a more compact conformation by changing a solution condition so that at least a portion of the polyelectrolyte polymer is associated with a precursor moiety to form a composite precursor moiety with a mean diameter in the range between about 1 nm and about 100 nm; and cross-linking the polyelectrolyte polymer of the composite precursor moiety to form a composite nanoparticle.


PubMed | Vive Nano
Type: | Journal: Methods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.) | Year: 2011

Scientists constantly generate great ideas in the laboratory and, as most of us were meant to believe, we should publish or perish. After all, what use is a great scientific idea if it is not shared with the rest of the scientific community? What some scientists forget is that a good idea can be worth something - sometimes it can be worth a lot (of money)! What do you do if you believe that your idea has some commercial potential? How do you turn this idea into a business? This chapter gives the aspiring scientific entrepreneur some (hopefully) valuable advice on topics like choosing the right people for your management team, determining inventorship of the technology and ownership shares in the new company, protecting your intellectual property, and others; finally, it describes some of the various pitfalls you may encounter when commercializing an early stage technology and instructions on how to avoid them.


The present invention provides a composition including a polymer nanoparticle and at least one agricultural active compound incorporated with the nanoparticle, wherein the nanoparticle are less than 100 nm in diameter, and the polymer includes a polyelectrolyte.


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