Vivantes Auguste Viktoria Klinikum

Berlin, Germany

Vivantes Auguste Viktoria Klinikum

Berlin, Germany
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PubMed | University of Würzburg, Charité - Medical University of Berlin, Vivantes Auguste Viktoria Klinikum, Hospital Universitari Vall dHebron Barcelona and Vivantes Klinikum Neukolln
Type: | Journal: Journal of cerebral blood flow and metabolism : official journal of the International Society of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism | Year: 2016

Stroke-associated pneumonia is a frequent complication after stroke associated with poor outcome. Dysphagia is a known risk factor for stroke-associated pneumonia but accumulating evidence suggests that stroke induces an immunodepressive state increasing susceptibility for stroke-associated pneumonia. We aimed to confirm that stroke-induced immunodepression syndrome is associated with stroke-associated pneumonia independently from dysphagia by investigating the predictive properties of monocytic HLA-DR expression as a marker of immunodepression as well as biomarkers for inflammation (interleukin-6) and infection (lipopolysaccharide-binding protein). This was a prospective, multicenter study with 11 study sites in Germany and Spain, including 486 patients with acute ischemic stroke. Daily screening for stroke-associated pneumonia, dysphagia and biomarkers was performed. Frequency of stroke-associated pneumonia was 5.2%. Dysphagia and decreased monocytic HLA-DR were independent predictors for stroke-associated pneumonia in multivariable regression analysis. Proportion of pneumonia ranged between 0.9% in the higher monocytic HLA-DR quartile (21,876mAb/cell) and 8.5% in the lower quartile (12,369mAb/cell). In the presence of dysphagia, proportion of pneumonia increased to 5.9% and 18.8%, respectively. Patients without dysphagia and normal monocytic HLA-DR expression had no stroke-associated pneumonia risk. We demonstrate that dysphagia and stroke-induced immunodepression syndrome are independent risk factors for stroke-associated pneumonia. Screening for immunodepression and dysphagia might be useful for identifying patients at high risk for stroke-associated pneumonia.


PubMed | Vivantes Auguste Viktoria Klinikum and Jena University Hospital
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Infection | Year: 2016

This study aimed at assessing the burden and spectrum of infectious diseases (ID) in a Metropolitan population in Germany.A discharge database using ICD-10 codes enabled the identification of hospitalizations with infection-related diagnoses. All hospital admissions between 2009 and 2014 were analysed from 9 municipal hospitals serving approximately one-third of an urban population of 3.5 million people.We identified 114,168 admissions with a primary (first-listed) ID diagnosis and 220,483 admissions with any-listed ID diagnosis, accounting for 8.9 % [95 % confidence interval (CI) 8.9-9.0 %] and 17.2 % (95 % CI 17.1-17.3) of all 1,284,559 admissions, respectively. Annually, 439,837 bed-days (range 413,707-488,520) were occupied by patients with an ID diagnosis, utilizing 22.8 % of total bed capacity. The median length of stay for patients with primary ID diagnosis and secondary ID diagnosis was 6 days (IQR 3-11) and 10 days (IQR 5-19), respectively. The most common diagnosis across all age groups was pneumonia (22.8 and 16.2 % of ID admissions as primary and secondary diagnosis, respectively). In-hospital mortality was 6.8 % (95 % CI 6.6-6.9) and 8.9 % (95 % CI 8.7-9.1) for ID as primary and secondary diagnosis, respectively.Infectious diseases contribute significantly to the overall burden of disease in a health system caring for an urban German population. In view of the magnitude of IDs contribution, establishing more specialists in ID medicine and adjusting the reimbursements for managing infection-related admissions should be made a public health priority in Germany.


Maier B.,TU Berlin | Hegenbarth C.,TU Berlin | Theres H.,Universitaetsmedizin Charite | Schoeller R.,DRK Kliniken Berlin | And 2 more authors.
Cardiology Journal | Year: 2014

Background: Guidelines for the management of atrial fibrillation (AFib) recommend antithromboembolic treatment strategies for patients with AFib and acute coronary syndrome (AFibACS). Our study assessed how current guidelines are implemented in the metropolitan area of Berlin and which therapeutic options were chosen in light of stroke and bleeding risk in everyday practice.Methods and Results: Between April 2008 and January 2012, we included 1,295 AFibACS patients in the AFibACS Registry, as part of the Berlin Myocardial Infarction Registry. Mean age of the patients was 76 years with numerous comorbidities (15.4% former stroke, 35.0% renal failure, 43.5% diabetes, 92.8% hypertension). Of all the patients, 888 were treated with stent implantation, 91 with balloon angioplasty, and 316 conservatively. Overall mortality was 11.6%, and 8.3% in stented patients. At hospital discharge, triple therapy was administered to 49.9% of stented cases. After adjustment, odds of receiving triple therapy were lower with increasing age and renal failure. Odds were higher after stent implantation, with a higher CHA2DS2-VASc score, and with any AFib category compared to initially diagnosed AFib. Between 2008 and 2011, triple therapy increased from 33.3% to 49.8% for stented patients and did not change significantly for those treated conservatively or with balloon angioplasty.Conclusions: These data suggest that in AFibACS patients, antithrombotic treatment focused on dual antiplatelet therapy for ACS, rather than on anticoagulation therapy for stroke prevention. Factors influencing therapy at discharge were age, renal failure, stent implantation, AFib category, and CHA2DS2-VASc score. During the study period, triple therapy increased for stented patients © 2014 Via Medica.


von Kleist M.,Free University of Berlin | Menz S.,Free University of Berlin | Stocker H.,Vivantes Auguste Viktoria Klinikum | Arasteh K.,Vivantes Auguste Viktoria Klinikum | And 3 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2011

The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can be suppressed by highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) in the majority of infected patients. Nevertheless, treatment interruptions inevitably result in viral rebounds from persistent, latently infected cells, necessitating lifelong treatment. Virological failure due to resistance development is a frequent event and the major threat to treatment success. Currently, it is recommended to change treatment after the confirmation of virological failure. However, at the moment virological failure is detected, drug resistant mutants already replicate in great numbers. They infect numerous cells, many of which will turn into latently infected cells. This pool of cells represents an archive of resistance, which has the potential of limiting future treatment options. The objective of this study was to design a treatment strategy for treatment-naive patients that decreases the likelihood of early treatment failure and preserves future treatment options. We propose to apply a single, pro-active treatment switch, following a period of treatment with an induction regimen. The main goal of the induction regimen is to decrease the abundance of randomly generated mutants that confer resistance to the maintenance regimen, thereby increasing subsequent treatment success. Treatment is switched before the overgrowth and archiving of mutant strains that carry resistance against the induction regimen and would limit its future re-use. In silico modelling shows that an optimal trade-off is achieved by switching treatment at ≈80 days after the initiation of antiviral therapy. Evaluation of the proposed treatment strategy demonstrated significant improvements in terms of resistance archiving and virological response, as compared to conventional HAART. While continuous pro-active treatment alternation improved the clinical outcome in a randomized trial, our results indicate that a similar improvement might also be reached after a single pro-active treatment switch. The clinical validity of this finding, however, remains to be shown by a corresponding trial. © 2011 von Kleist et al.


Ebinger M.,Charité - Medical University of Berlin | Winter B.,Charité - Medical University of Berlin | Wendt M.,Charité - Medical University of Berlin | Weber J.E.,Charité - Medical University of Berlin | And 15 more authors.
JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association | Year: 2014

IMPORTANCE: Time to thrombolysis is crucial for outcome in acute ischemic stroke. OBJECTIVE: To determine if starting thrombolysis in a specialized ambulance reduces delays. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: In the Prehospital Acute Neurological Treatment and Optimization of Medical care in Stroke Study (PHANTOM-S), conducted in Berlin, Germany, we randomly assigned weeks with and without availability of the Stroke Emergency Mobile (STEMO) from May 1, 2011, to January 31, 2013. Berlin has an established stroke care infrastructure with 14 stroke units. We included 6182 adult patients (STEMO weeks: 44.3% male, mean [SD] age, 73.9 [15.0] y; control weeks: 45.2%male, mean [SD] age, 74.3 [14.9] y) for whom a stroke dispatch was activated. INTERVENTIONS: The intervention comprised an ambulance (STEMO) equipped with a CT scanner, point-of-care laboratory, and telemedicine connection; a stroke identification algorithm at dispatcher level; and a prehospital stroke team. Thrombolysis was started before transport to hospital if ischemic stroke was confirmed and contraindications excluded. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Primary outcomewas alarm-to-thrombolysis time. Secondary outcomes included thrombolysis rate, secondary intracerebral hemorrhage after thrombolysis, and 7-day mortality. RESULTS: Time reduction was assessed in all patients with a stroke dispatch from the entire catchment area in STEMO weeks (3213 patients) vs control weeks (2969 patients) and in patients in whom STEMO was available and deployed (1804 patients) vs control weeks (2969 patients). Compared with thrombolysis during control weeks, there was a reduction of 15 minutes (95% CI, 11-19) in alarm-to-treatment times in the catchment area during STEMO weeks (76.3 min; 95% CI, 73.2-79.3 vs 61.4 min; 95% CI, 58.7-64.0; P < .001). Among patients for whom STEMO was deployed, mean alarm-to-treatment time (51.8 min; 95% CI, 49.0-54.6) was shorter by 25 minutes (95% CI, 20-29; P < .001) than during control weeks. Thrombolysis rates in ischemic stroke were 29% (310/1070) during STEMO weeks and 33% (200/614) after STEMO deployment vs 21% (220/1041) during control weeks (differences, 8%; 95%CI, 4%-12%; P < .001, and 12%, 95% CI, 7%-16%; P < .001, respectively). STEMO deployment incurred no increased risk for intracerebral hemorrhage (STEMO deployment: 7/200; conventional care: 22/323; adjusted odds ratio [OR], 0.42, 95%CI, 0.18-1.03; P = .06) or 7-day mortality (9/199 vs 15/323; adjusted OR, 0.76; 95%CI, 0.31-1.82; P = .53). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Compared with usual care, the use of ambulance-based thrombolysis resulted in decreased time to treatment without an increase in adverse events. Further studies are needed to assess the effects on clinical outcomes. TRIAL REGISTRATION: clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01382862. Copyright 2014 American Medical Association. All rights reserved.


Sander T.H.,Physikalisch - Technische Bundesanstalt | Leistner S.,Charité - Medical University of Berlin | Geisler F.,Charité - Medical University of Berlin | MacKert B.M.,Vivantes Auguste Viktoria Klinikum | Trahms L.,Physikalisch - Technische Bundesanstalt
Physiological Measurement | Year: 2011

In a pilot study, stroke patients with a lesion related to the motor system were studied using magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electromyography (EMG). The patients performed sustained finger movements for 30 s followed by 30 s of rest and 20 repetitions of this sequence in total. Task-related cortical signals derived from MEG were observed here at very different frequency scales. Slow signals below 0.1 Hz were extracted by independent component analysis and are associated with the sustained activation of the motor cortex, the dcMEG motor activation. MEG-EMG coupling phenomena in the 10-30 Hz range were analyzed using the imaginary part of coherency and are attributed to cortico-muscular coupling driving the muscles. Additionally a signal from the somatosensory cortex due to an electrical stimulation at the wrist, the N20m, was recorded as a physiological marker. Field maps and time series associated with the three types of signals are presented for one patient and one control subject as the signal quality of the patient data was not sufficient to achieve a group result. The feasibility of a comprehensive electrophysiological measuring and analysis procedure of the motor function for stroke research is demonstrated by the results. © 2011 Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine.


Katchanov J.,Vivantes Auguste Viktoria Klinikum | Branding G.,Vivantes Auguste Viktoria Klinikum | Jefferys L.,Vivantes Auguste Viktoria Klinikum | Arasteh K.,Vivantes Auguste Viktoria Klinikum | And 2 more authors.
International Journal of STD and AIDS | Year: 2016

To determine the frequency, imaging characteristics, neuroanatomical distribution and dynamics of magnetic resonance imaging findings in HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis in immunocompromised patients we compared patients without antiretroviral therapy with patients undergoing immune reconstitution. Neuroimaging and clinical data of 21 consecutive patients presenting to a German HIV centre in a 10-year period between 2005 and 2014 were reviewed. We identified eight patients with magnetic resonance imaging findings related to cryptococcal disease: five patients without antiretroviral therapy and three patients receiving effective antiretroviral therapy resulting in immune reconstitution. The pattern of magnetic resonance imaging manifestations was different in the two groups. In patients not on antiretroviral therapy, pseudocysts (n = 3) and lacunar ischaemic lesions (n = 2) were detected. Contrast-enhancing focal leptomeningeal and/or parenchymal lesions were found in all patients under immune reconstitution (n = 3). Magnetic resonance imaging lesions suggestive of leptomeningitis or meningoencephalitis were detected in all patients with a recurrence of cryptococcal meningitis under immune reconstitution, which differs from the classical magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients without antiretroviral therapy. In antiretroviral therapy-treated patients with past medical history of cryptococcal meningitis, detection of contrast-enhancing focal meningeal and/or parenchymal lesions should prompt further investigations for a recurrence of cryptococcal meningitis under immune reconstitution. © 2015, © The Author(s) 2015.


PubMed | Charité - Medical University of Berlin and Vivantes Auguste Viktoria Klinikum
Type: Comparative Study | Journal: International journal of STD & AIDS | Year: 2015

To determine the frequency, imaging characteristics, neuroanatomical distribution and dynamics of magnetic resonance imaging findings in HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis in immunocompromised patients we compared patients without antiretroviral therapy with patients undergoing immune reconstitution. Neuroimaging and clinical data of 21 consecutive patients presenting to a German HIV centre in a 10-year period between 2005 and 2014 were reviewed. We identified eight patients with magnetic resonance imaging findings related to cryptococcal disease: five patients without antiretroviral therapy and three patients receiving effective antiretroviral therapy resulting in immune reconstitution. The pattern of magnetic resonance imaging manifestations was different in the two groups. In patients not on antiretroviral therapy, pseudocysts (n = 3) and lacunar ischaemic lesions (n = 2) were detected. Contrast-enhancing focal leptomeningeal and/or parenchymal lesions were found in all patients under immune reconstitution (n = 3). Magnetic resonance imaging lesions suggestive of leptomeningitis or meningoencephalitis were detected in all patients with a recurrence of cryptococcal meningitis under immune reconstitution, which differs from the classical magnetic resonance imaging findings in patients without antiretroviral therapy. In antiretroviral therapy-treated patients with past medical history of cryptococcal meningitis, detection of contrast-enhancing focal meningeal and/or parenchymal lesions should prompt further investigations for a recurrence of cryptococcal meningitis under immune reconstitution.


Ingiliz P.,Medical Center for Infectious Diseases | Krznaric I.,Medical Center for Infectious Diseases | Stellbrink H..-J.,Study Center | Knecht G.,Infectious Diseases Center | And 9 more authors.
HIV Medicine | Year: 2014

Objectives: The incidence of sexually transmitted hepatitis C virus (HCV) reinfection is on the rise in HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM). Data on natural history of acute hepatitis C and possible factors associated with spontaneous clearance are limited. The aim of this study was to analyse the outcome of HCV reinfections in HIV-positive MSM. Methods: A retrospective analysis was carried out on patients with more than one sexually acquired HCV infection who were diagnosed at four major German HIV and hepatitis care centres. Reinfection was defined by genotype or phylogenetic clade switch, detectable HCV RNA after a sustained virological response (SVR) or after spontaneous clearance (SC). Results: In total, 48 HIV-positive MSM were identified with HCV reinfection, among them 11 with a third episode and one patient with four episodes. At the first episode, 43 and five patients had an SVR and SC, respectively. The second episode was accompanied by a genotype switch in 29 patients (60%). Whereas 30 and nine patients showed an SVR and SC, respectively, eight patients developed chronic hepatitis. Neither HCV genotype switch nor interleukin-28B genotype was associated with SC. However, SC rates at the second episode were higher for patients with SC at the first episode compared with patients without SC (60 vs. 14%, respectively; P=0.03). Two patients with SC at the first episode were reinfected with the same genotype. Conclusions: Multiple reinfections in HIV-infected MSM do occur, with or without genotype switch, and with prior SC of previous episodes. In this large case series, except for SC at the first episode, no factor was of value in clinical decision-making for early therapeutic intervention in acute HCV reinfection. Copyright © 2014 British HIV Association.


Schulz S.,TU Munich | Kastrati A.,TU Munich | Ferenc M.,Herz Zentrum Bad Krozingen | Massberg S.,TU Munich | And 10 more authors.
EuroIntervention | Year: 2013

Aims: Thirty-day results of the double-blind, randomised Intracoronary Stenting and Antithrombotic Regimen - Rapid Early Action for Coronary Treatment (ISAR-REACT) 4 trial showed no difference in ischaemic complications and a reduction in bleeding by bivalirudin versus abciximab and heparin in 1,721 patients with non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). A longer follow-up may be required to assess the whole potential benefit of a periprocedural antithrombotic therapy. Methods and results: The primary outcome for this analysis was the composite of death, myocardial infarction or target vessel revascularisation one year after randomisation. Secondary outcome was the composite of death or myocardial infarction. At one year, the primary outcome occurred in 21.3% of patients assigned to abciximab and heparin versus 21.5% assigned to bivalirudin (hazard ratio [HR] 0.99; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.80-1.21; p=0.94). The combined incidence of death or myocardial infarction was 15.7% in the abciximab and heparin group versus 16.0% in the bivalirudin group (HR 0.99; 95% CI: 0.78-1.26; p=0.94). The mortality rates were 4.0% and 4.7%, respectively (HR 0.85; 95% CI: 0.54-1.34; p=0.48). At one year, no significant differences in the primary outcome were observed with abciximab and heparin versus bivalirudin in any of the subgroups analysed. Conclusions: In patients with NSTEMI undergoing PCI, abciximab with heparin and bivalirudin provide comparable outcomes at one year, although bivalirudin reduced the rate of bleeding at 30 days. Clinical trial registration information: URL www.clinicaltrials.gov; Unique identifier NCT00373451. © Europa Digital & Publishing 2013. All rights reserved.

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