Langenfeld, Germany
Langenfeld, Germany

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Scholey A.,Swinburne University of Technology | Gibbs A.,Swinburne University of Technology | Neale C.,Swinburne University of Technology | Perry N.,Swinburne University of Technology | And 7 more authors.
Agro Food Industry Hi-Tech | Year: 2015

The traditional application of Lemon balm focuses on calming and relaxing effects. Modern research has demonstrated new effects of Lemon balm on cognitive health. Here we evaluated the cognitive effects of a Lemon balm extract administered in confectionary bars with different sweetening systems. Using a double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study a cohort of 25 healthy people were tested. Word recognition was significantly improved by 0.6g Lemon balm extract in a confectionary bar. The Lemon balm/sugar confection was associated with higher mental fatigue in contrast to the Lemon balm/natural fruit sweetener confection. In conclusion, we have shown for the first time that a special Lemon balm extract administered in a confectionary bar leads to a significantly improvement of cognition.


PubMed | Merck Selbstmedikation GmbH, Swinburne University of Technology, Vital Solutions GmbH and Rudolf Wild GmbH & Co. KG
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Nutrients | Year: 2014

Lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) has been used historically and contemporarily as a modulator of mood and cognitive function, with anxiolytic effects following administration of capsules, coated tablets and topical application. Following a pilot study with lemon balm extract administered as a water based drink, which confirmed absorption of rosmarinic acid effects on mood and cognitive function, we conducted two similar double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover studies. These evaluated the mood and cognitive effects of a standardised M. officinalis preparation administered in palatable forms in a beverage and in yoghurt. In each study a cohort of healthy young adults self-rated aspects of mood were measured before and after a multi-tasking framework (MTF) administered one hour and three hours following one of four treatments. Both active lemon balm treatments were generally associated with improvements in mood and/or cognitive performance, though there were some behavioral costs at other doses and these effects depended to some degree on the delivery matrix.


Scholey A.,University of Vic | Gibbs A.,University of Vic | Neale C.,University of Vic | Perry N.,University of Vic | And 6 more authors.
Nutrients | Year: 2014

Lemon balm (Melissa officinalis) has been used historically and contemporarily as a modulator of mood and cognitive function, with anxiolytic effects following administration of capsules, coated tablets and topical application. Following a pilot study with lemon balm extract administered as a water based drink, which confirmed absorption of rosmarinic acid effects on mood and cognitive function, we conducted two similar double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover studies. These evaluated the mood and cognitive effects of a standardised M. officinalis preparation administered in palatable forms in a beverage and in yoghurt. In each study a cohort of healthy young adults’ self-rated aspects of mood were measured before and after a multi-tasking framework (MTF) administered one hour and three hours following one of four treatments. Both active lemon balm treatments were generally associated with improvements in mood and/or cognitive performance, though there were some behavioral “costs” at other doses and these effects depended to some degree on the delivery matrix. © 2014 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.


Buchwald-Werner S.,Vital Solutions GmbH | Fujii H.,Amino Up Chemicals Co. | Schon C.,BioTeSys | Doebis C.,Institute fur Medizinische Diagnostik MVZ GbR
Agro Food Industry Hi-Tech | Year: 2012

Perilla frutescens (L) Britton leaves are used as food and in traditional medicine. A Perilla leaf special extract was used to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects and mode of immune-modulatory properties in the following ex vivo experiments addressing different immune cells. After stimulation, pattern of cytokines were determined and thus information about mode of action derived. As a result, anti-inflammatory effects were seen on the monocytic level with significant reduction of TNF-a production whereas on the T-helper cellular level, reactions were less pronounced but a shift towards a TH2-helper response was identified. Both effects were dose dependent. Results underline the anti-inflammatory and other immune-modulatory properties which might impact the beneficial effects in different indications, like for example irritable bowel syndrome.


Suarez C.G.,Vital Solutions GmbH | Beckett K.,PhytoTrade Africa | Den Adel S.,CRIAA SA DC | Buchwald-Werner S.,Vital Solutions GmbH
Agro Food Industry Hi-Tech | Year: 2012

Marula fruits, Sclerocarya birrea (A. Rich). Hochst., are consumed in Africa where they are appreciated for their nutritional value, refreshing flavour and as a product of trade. Traditional applications include food and beverage, cosmetic, medicinal and spiritual use. The wide range of applications have brought this species to the attention of industry, where unique selling points are based around the nutritional profile, flavour characteristics and it's African origin. In this study fresh fruit samples from 40 trees in Northern Namibia were used to investigate the ripening process based on typical fruit quality control parameters as well as phytochemical analysis. In addition, local knowledge about the Marula fruit was studied thorough interviews of the tree owners. A close correlation was observed between harvester determination of ripeness and the analytical results using laboratory equipment. Harvesters identified fruits of optimum ripeness for processing based on colour, firmness and flavour. The results of this study provide the basis for industrial applications of the fruit, along with business development opportunities for harvesters and the communities involved.


Buchwald-Werner S.,Vital Solutions GmbH | Fujii H.,Amino Up Chemical Co. | Reule C.,BioTeSys | Schoen C.,BioTeSys
BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine | Year: 2014

Background: Gastrointestinal (GI) discomfort, e.g. bloating or rumbling, is a common symptom in otherwise healthy adults. Approximately 20% of the population, particularly women suffer from gastrointestinal discomfort and this affects quality of life. Recent studies discovered a link between the body and mind, called the gut-brain axis. Psychosocial factors, such as e.g. daily stress may cause altered gut physiology leading to ileum contractions and consequently gastrointestinal symptoms. In vitro and ex vivo studies clearly showed that a Perilla frutescens extract combines prokinetic, antispasmodic and anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of the intervention was to investigate the effects of the proprietary Perilla extract on GI discomfort in healthy subjects with gastrointestinal discomfort and reduced bowel movements in comparison to a placebo product.Methods: The pilot study was performed according to a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled parallel design. Fifty healthy subjects with gastrointestinal discomfort and reduced bowel movements, 30-70 years, documented their GI symptoms, stool frequency and consistency daily during a 2-week run-in phase and a 4-week intervention phase with Perilla frutescens extract or placebo. GI symptoms were assessed on a 5-point scale daily and average scores over 14 days intervals were calculated.Results: All GI symptoms were significantly improved over time by Perilla frutescens extract during the intervention phase (bloating: -0.44 ± 0.56, p = 0.0003; passage of gas: -0.30 ± 0.66, p = 0.0264; GI rumbling: -0.55 ± 0.87, p = 0.0014; feeling of fullness: -0.36 ± 0.72, p = 0.0152; abdominal discomfort: -0.54 ± 0.75, p = 0.004), whereas in the placebo group only abdominal discomfort was significantly improved (-0.31 ± 0.55, p = 0.0345). In the subgroup of women results were strengthened and a subscore out of bloating and abdominal discomfort was significantly improved against placebo (95%CI 0.003 to 0.77; p = 0.048).Conclusion: The demonstrated effects of Perilla frutescens extract to improve GI complaints offer very promising results, taking into consideration the challenging set up of a nutritional human study with healthy subjects and in the area of digestive health, which is known for high placebo effects.Trial registration number: NCT01931930 at ClinicalTrials.gov, Registration date 23rd August 2013. © 2014 Buchwald-Werner et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Verspohl E.J.,University of Munster | Fujii H.,Amino Up Chemicals | Homma K.,Amino Up Chemicals | Buchwald-Werner S.,Vital Solutions GmbH
Phytomedicine | Year: 2013

Gastrointestinal discomfort is frequently observed. The effects of Perilla frutescens extract and Vicenin 2 (a compound in this extract) were assayed in rat ileum with or without stimulation with acetylcholine or Ba2+. Both had no direct spasmolytic effect, but both decreased acetylcholine- or Ba2+-induced contraction of rat ileum indicating an antispasmodic effect. This is valuable because effects were only observed when spasms were induced and may disturb the patient. The extract and the compound may be used to maintain and improve gut health. © 2012 Elsevier GmbH.


Rochter S.,Vital Solutions Swiss AG | Ehrhardt C.,Vital Solutions Swiss AG | Buchwald-Werner S.,Vital Solutions GmbH | Berger-Buter K.,Vital Solutions Swiss AG | Schatton E.,Vital Solutions Swiss AG
Agro Food Industry Hi-Tech | Year: 2015

Mango (Mangifera indica L.) is not only a delicious fruit but also known for its nutritional value. The fruits contain significant levels of bioactive compounds including polyphenols and vitamins. A special Mangifera indica L.fruit powder was used to investigate the activation of master regulators of the aging process such as sirtuin 1 and AMP activated protein kinase. Furthermore, related effects like mitochondrial biogenesis as well as anti-oxidative effects based on superoxide dismutase activity augmentation were investigated. As a result, the special Mangifera indica L.fruit powder showed activation of these master regulators and related modulation underlining potential beneficial effects for well aging.


Buchwald-Werner S.,Vital Solutions GmbH | Vazquez I.,Vital Solutions GmbH | Rochter S.,Vital Solutions GmbH
Agro Food Industry Hi-Tech | Year: 2015

Melissa officinalis (L.) leaves, Lemon balm, are used as food and in traditional medicine. The traditional application of Lemon balm focuses on calming and relaxing effects. Modern research has demonstrated new effects of Lemon balm on cognitive health. A Melissa officinalis special extract was used to investigate muscarinic receptor M1 binding properties in the following in vitro experiments. Competitive binding to muscarinic M1 receptor was determined by measuring muscarinic displacement using a human recombinant muscarinic M1 receptor expressed in CHO (Chinese Hamster Ovary cells). As a result, the special Melissa officinalis extract showed muscarinic receptor M1 binding underlining cognitive effects, which might impact the beneficial effects of the extract in different indications for cognition and mental health.


PubMed | Vital Solutions GmbH
Type: | Journal: BMC complementary and alternative medicine | Year: 2014

Gastrointestinal (GI) discomfort, e.g. bloating or rumbling, is a common symptom in otherwise healthy adults. Approximately 20% of the population, particularly women suffer from gastrointestinal discomfort and this affects quality of life. Recent studies discovered a link between the body and mind, called the gut-brain axis. Psychosocial factors, such as e.g. daily stress may cause altered gut physiology leading to ileum contractions and consequently gastrointestinal symptoms. In vitro and ex vivo studies clearly showed that a Perilla frutescens extract combines prokinetic, antispasmodic and anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of the intervention was to investigate the effects of the proprietary Perilla extract on GI discomfort in healthy subjects with gastrointestinal discomfort and reduced bowel movements in comparison to a placebo product.The pilot study was performed according to a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled parallel design. Fifty healthy subjects with gastrointestinal discomfort and reduced bowel movements, 30-70 years, documented their GI symptoms, stool frequency and consistency daily during a 2-week run-in phase and a 4-week intervention phase with Perilla frutescens extract or placebo. GI symptoms were assessed on a 5-point scale daily and average scores over 14 days intervals were calculated.All GI symptoms were significantly improved over time by Perilla frutescens extract during the intervention phase (bloating: -0.440.56, p=0.0003; passage of gas: -0.300.66, p=0.0264; GI rumbling: -0.550.87, p=0.0014; feeling of fullness: -0.360.72, p=0.0152; abdominal discomfort: -0.540.75, p=0.004), whereas in the placebo group only abdominal discomfort was significantly improved (-0.310.55, p=0.0345). In the subgroup of women results were strengthened and a subscore out of bloating and abdominal discomfort was significantly improved against placebo (95%CI 0.003 to 0.77; p=0.048).The demonstrated effects of Perilla frutescens extract to improve GI complaints offer very promising results, taking into consideration the challenging set up of a nutritional human study with healthy subjects and in the area of digestive health, which is known for high placebo effects.NCT01931930 at ClinicalTrials.gov, Registration date 23rd August 2013.

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