Entity

Time filter

Source Type


Wiederhold B.K.,The Virtual Reality Medical Center | Wiederhold B.K.,Virtual Reality Medical Institute | Riva G.,Catholic University of the Sacred Heart | Riva G.,Applied Technology for Neuro Psychology Laboratory | Gutierrez-Maldonado J.,University of Barcelona
Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking | Year: 2016

Virtual Reality (VR) has, for the past two decades, proven to be a useful adjunctive tool for both assessment and treatment of patients with eating disorders and obesity. VR allows an individual to enter scenarios that simulate real-life situations and to encounter food cues known to trigger his/her disordered eating behavior. As well, VR enables three-dimensional figures of the patient's body to be presented, helping him/her to reach an awareness of body image distortion and then providing the opportunity to confront and correct distortions, resulting in a more realistic body image and a decrease in body image dissatisfaction. In this paper, we describe seminal studies in this research area. © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. 2016. Source


Gutierrez-Maldonado J.,University of Barcelona | Wiederhold B.K.,Virtual Reality Medical Institute | Wiederhold B.K.,The Virtual Reality Medical Center | Riva G.,Catholic University of the Sacred Heart | Riva G.,Applied Technology for Neuro Psychology Laboratory
Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking | Year: 2016

Transdisciplinary efforts for further elucidating the etiology of eating and weight disorders and improving the effectiveness of the available evidence-based interventions are imperative at this time. Recent studies indicate that computer-generated graphic environments - virtual reality (VR) - can integrate and extend existing treatments for eating and weight disorders (EWDs). Future possibilities for VR to improve actual approaches include its use for altering in real time the experience of the body (embodiment) and as a cue exposure tool for reducing food craving. © Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. 2016. Source


Wiederhold B.K.,Virtual Reality Medical Institute | Gavshon L.,The Virtual Reality Medical Center | Wiederhold M.D.,The Virtual Reality Medical Center
Journal of Cyber Therapy and Rehabilitation | Year: 2010

Fear of flying impacts an estimated 10-20% of the U.S. population. Those suffering from this fear either avoid flying or endure flights with intense anxiety and distress, often relying on alcohol or medication to transcend the experience. Virtual Reality Exposure Therapy (VRET) has been used successfully to treat fear of flying for the past fifteen years. Clinical case reports and controlled studies have shown VR to be highly effective in treating this phobia, since patients can actively practice new coping skills while engaging in a controlled exposure experience. The stimulus of the virtual environment has been found to trigger a dissociative state in patients prone to react this way when confronted with an anxietyprovoking situation. A case report examining the impact of dissociation on VRET for fear of flying will be presented. This case will incorporate physiological data as well as patient information obtained through self-report measures, and will be discussed through modern psychoanalytic theory. VR has typically been thought of as a useful adjunct to traditional cognitive behavioral therapies, however, it is also proving beneficial as an additive to psychodynamic therapy. Viewing a patient through the lens of psychodynamic theory can be particularly helpful in understanding the effectiveness of VRET. © Virtual Reality Medical Institute. Source


Graffigna G.,Catholic University of the Sacred Heart | Barello S.,Catholic University of the Sacred Heart | Triberti S.,Catholic University of the Sacred Heart | Wiederhold B.K.,Virtual Reality Medical Institute | And 3 more authors.
Studies in Health Technology and Informatics | Year: 2014

Academic and managerial interest in patient engagement is rapidly earning attention and becoming a necessary tool for researchers, clinicians and policymakers worldwide to manage the increasing burden of chronic conditions. The concept of patient engagement calls for a reframe of healthcare organizations' models and approaches to care. This also requires innovations in the direction of facilitating the exchanges between the patients and the healthcare. eHealth, namely the use of new communication technologies to provide healthcare, is proved to be proposable to innovate healthcare organizations and to improve exchanges between patients and health providers. However, little attention has been still devoted to how to best design eHealth tools in order to engage patients in their care. eHealth tools have to be appropriately designed according to the specific patients' unmet needs and priorities featuring the different phases of the engagement process. Basing on the Patient Engagement model and on the Positive Technology paradigm, we suggest a toolkit of phase-specific technological resources, highlighting their specific potentialities in fostering the patient engagement process. © 2014 The authors and IOS Press. Source


Wiederhold B.K.,Virtual Reality Medical Institute | Wiederhold M.D.,The Virtual Reality Medical Center
Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking | Year: 2010

Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a complex, multifaceted disorder encompassing behavioral, emotional, cognitive, and physiological factors. Although PTSD was only codified in 1980, there has been an increasing interest in this area of research. Unfortunately, relatively little attention has been given to the psychological treatment of motor vehicle accident survivors, which is remarkable because vehicular collisions are deemed the number one cause of PTSD. As the emotional consequences of vehicular collisions prevail, so does the need for more effective treatments. Randomized controlled clinical trials have identified exposure-based therapies as being the most efficacious for extinguishing fears. One type of exposure-based treatment, called virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET), provides a safe, controlled, and effective therapeutic alternative that is not dependent on real-life props, situations, or even a person's imagination capabilities. This modality, while relatively new, has been implemented successfully in the treatment of a variety of anxiety disorders and may offer a particularly beneficial and intermediary step for the treatment of collision-related PTSD. In particular, VRET combined with physiological monitoring and feedback provides a unique opportunity for individuals to objectively recognize both anxiety and relaxation; learn how to manage their anxiety during difficult, albeit simulated, driving conditions; and then transfer these skills onto real-life roadways. © 2010 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. Source

Discover hidden collaborations