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Blacksburg, VA, United States

Luo C.,Shenzhen University | Luo C.,National University of Singapore | Hong H.,National University of Singapore | Cheng L.,VirginiaTech. | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Network and Computer Applications | Year: 2016

Fingerprint-based indoor localization has attracted extensive research efforts due to its potential for deployment without extensive infrastructure support. However, the accuracies of these different systems vary and it is difficult to compare and evaluate these systems systematically. In this work, we propose a Gaussian process based approach that takes the radio map and the localization algorithm as an input, and outputs the expected accuracy of the localization system. With an efficient error estimation algorithm, many applications such as landmark detection, localization algorithm selection and access point subset selection can be performed. Our evaluations show that our approach provides sufficient accuracy and can serve as a useful tool for system evaluation and performance tuning when developing fingerprint-based indoor localization systems. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Source


Gao W.,Purdue University | Zhang Y.,Purdue University | Ramanujan D.,Purdue University | Ramani K.,Purdue University | And 6 more authors.
CAD Computer Aided Design | Year: 2015

Additive manufacturing (AM) is poised to bring about a revolution in the way products are designed, manufactured, and distributed to end users. This technology has gained significant academic as well as industry interest due to its ability to create complex geometries with customizable material properties. AM has also inspired the development of the maker movement by democratizing design and manufacturing. Due to the rapid proliferation of a wide variety of technologies associated with AM, there is a lack of a comprehensive set of design principles, manufacturing guidelines, and standardization of best practices. These challenges are compounded by the fact that advancements in multiple technologies (for example materials processing, topology optimization) generate a "positive feedback loop" effect in advancing AM. In order to advance research interest and investment in AM technologies, some fundamental questions and trends about the dependencies existing in these avenues need highlighting. The goal of our review paper is to organize this body of knowledge surrounding AM, and present current barriers, findings, and future trends significantly to the researchers. We also discuss fundamental attributes of AM processes, evolution of the AM industry, and the affordances enabled by the emergence of AM in a variety of areas such as geometry processing, material design, and education. We conclude our paper by pointing out future directions such as the "print-it-all" paradigm, that have the potential to re-imagine current research and spawn completely new avenues for exploration. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Layne P.,VirginiaTech.
Leadership and Management in Engineering | Year: 2010

Despite tremendous gains over the past 30 years, women are still severely underrepresented in engineering and engineering education. The advancement of women into leadership roles in engineering education has the potential to make engineering as a career more attractive to young women and to encourage women currently pursuing careers in engineering education to aspire to leadership positions themselves. This article reports on a series of structured interviews in which women deans of engineering were asked to describe their role and accomplishments as dean, their career paths, and their perspective on the impact of gender on their leadership style. The interviews provide insights into how these women saw themselves as leaders and how they were leading their institutions in creating engineers for the 21st century. © 2010 ASCE. Source


Gao W.,Purdue University | Zhang Y.,Purdue University | Ramanujan D.,Purdue University | Ramani K.,Purdue University | And 6 more authors.
CAD Computer Aided Design | Year: 2015

Additive manufacturing (AM) is poised to bring about a revolution in the way products are designed, manufactured, and distributed to end users. This technology has gained significant academic as well as industry interest due to its ability to create complex geometries with customizable material properties. AM has also inspired the development of the maker movement by democratizing design and manufacturing. Due to the rapid proliferation of a wide variety of technologies associated with AM, there is a lack of a comprehensive set of design principles, manufacturing guidelines, and standardization of best practices. These challenges are compounded by the fact that advancements in multiple technologies (for example materials processing, topology optimization) generate a "positive feedback loop" effect in advancing AM. In order to advance research interest and investment in AM technologies, some fundamental questions and trends about the dependencies existing in these avenues need highlighting. The goal of our review paper is to organize this body of knowledge surrounding AM, and present current barriers, findings, and future trends significantly to the researchers. We also discuss fundamental attributes of AM processes, evolution of the AM industry, and the affordances enabled by the emergence of AM in a variety of areas such as geometry processing, material design, and education. We conclude our paper by pointing out future directions such as the "print-it-all" paradigm, that have the potential to re-imagine current research and spawn completely new avenues for exploration. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 69.91K | Year: 2007

Heated plumes in a crossflow produce a thermal infrared signature and can impinge on temperature-sensitive systems downstream; both factors can degrade the performance and survivability of military assets. No validated code exists that can model heated jets from non-circular nozzles in a crossflow. Current CFD solutions are problematic due to the numerous expert modeling choices that they require. CFD issues that arise include inadequate grid resolution, imprecise boundary conditions, and deficient turbulence models. ThermoAnalytics, Metacomp Technologies, and Dr. Joseph Schetz of Virginia Tech propose an integrated program of experiment, advanced CFD modeling, and test-model validation to develop a validated, accurate, simple-to-use plume prediction tool that can model heated plumes injected into a crossflow. The proposed tool will predict the flowfield of heated plumes based on a simple set of geometry, temperature, and velocity inputs. The automated CFD tool, based on Metacomp's CFD++ and MIME codes, will automatically generate the grid and complete a CFD analysis for the flow from non-traditional shaped exits and groups of exits. A comprehensive wind tunnel testing program will validate the code's ability to predict the flowfield, infrared radiance of the plume, and the thermal effects of plume impingement on downstream surfaces.

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