Blacksburg, VA, United States

Virginia State University

www.vsu.edu
Blacksburg, VA, United States

Virginia State University is a historically black land-grant university located north of the Appomattox River in Ettrick, Chesterfield County, near Petersburg, Virginia. Founded on March 6, 1882 , Virginia State developed as the United States's first fully state-supported four-year institution of higher learning for black Americans. The university is a member school of the Thurgood Marshall College Fund. Wikipedia.

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News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

MCLEAN, Va.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Booz Allen Hamilton today announced that General Dennis L. Via, U.S. Army (Retired) has joined Booz Allen as a Senior Executive Advisor and Fellow for Defense Futures, a position representing the highest level of career achievement and impact in the industry and at the firm. In his role as Fellow, Gen. Via, an expert in the U.S. defense enterprise, military readiness, and capability development, will help defense, intelligence and homeland security clients meet the complexities of today’s evolving threat and budgetary environments. He will also help formulate the firm’s future business strategy for the defense market. Horacio Rozanski, president and chief executive officer of Booz Allen said, “Dennis is an exceptional leader who will continue his service to our nation through his position as Booz Allen Fellow.” Joe Logue, executive vice president and leader of Booz Allen’s defense and intelligence business added, “Our nation is confronting an expanding set of defense and security challenges amid unprecedented change. Dennis brings a wide range of experience in the defense enterprise of the United States, and will offer invaluable insights to us and our clients.” During his 36-year military career, Gen. Via commanded at all levels, including several years as commanding general and deputy commanding general of the Army Materiel Command (AMC). AMC is the Army's premier provider of materiel readiness to ensure dominant land force capability for American warfighters and our allies. Prior to his AMC roles, Gen. Via held multiple commander, signal and chief information officer roles in areas ranging from communication infrastructure, to cybersecurity, global logistics, and research, development, and engineering for the Army and Department of Defense. He is the first commissioned signal corps officer in the Army’s history to achieve the rank of four-star general, and he received numerous honors and awards throughout his career. Gen. Via is a native of Martinsville, Virginia, and was commissioned in 1980 in the Signal Corps after completing his bachelor of arts as a Distinguished Military Graduate from Virginia State University. He holds a Master’s degree in management from Boston University and is a graduate of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College and the U.S. Army War College. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, Association of the United States Army, and Armed Forces Communications Electronics Association. Booz Allen Hamilton (NYSE: BAH) has been at the forefront of strategy and technology for more than 100 years. Today, the firm provides management and technology consulting and engineering services to leading Fortune 500 corporations, governments, and not-for-profits across the globe. Booz Allen partners with public and private sector clients to solve their most difficult challenges through a combination of consulting, analytics, mission operations, technology, systems delivery, cybersecurity, engineering, and innovation expertise. With international headquarters in McLean, Virginia, the firm employs approximately 22,800 people globally, and had revenue of $5.41 billion for the 12 months ended March 31, 2016.


Tyson J.J.,Virginia State University | Novak B.,University of Oxford
Annual Review of Physical Chemistry | Year: 2010

The signal-response characteristics of a living cell are determined by complex networks of interacting genes, proteins, and metabolites. Understanding how cells respond to specific challenges, how these responses are contravened in diseased cells, and how to intervene pharmacologically in the decision-making processes of cells requires an accurate theory of the information-processing capabilities of macromolecular regulatory networks. Adopting an engineer's approach to control systems, we ask whether realistic cellular control networks can be decomposed into simple regulatory motifs that carry out specific functions in a cell. We show that such functional motifs exist and review the experimental evidence that they control cellular responses as expected. Copyright © 2010 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: HIST BLACK COLLEGES AND UNIV | Award Amount: 400.00K | Year: 2015

The Historically Black Colleges and Universities Undergraduate Program (HBCU-UP) through Targeted Infusion Projects supports the development, implementation, and study of evidence-based innovative models and approaches for improving the preparation and success of HBCU undergraduate students so that they may pursue STEM graduate programs and/or careers. The project at Virginia State University (VSU) seeks to develop, implement and test the impact of a series of Algebra Project pedagogical techniques and content material in College Algebra and pre-Calculus courses, as well as cognitive training techniques that have been piloted in previous studies at VSU. The project aims to address the problem of the failure rate in College Algebra courses at the institution, which is at about 40%. Failing these courses prevents students from taking Calculus, which is the prerequisite mathematics sequence for students majoring in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics disciplines. The project is guided by an on-going evaluation.

This project will assess the efficacy of implementing a conceptual architecture for college mathematics developed by the Algebra Project which is accessible to students at the level of College Algebra and pre-Calculus, and which has the potential to deepen and strengthen
students understanding of the course content and provide a solid conceptual and procedural foundation for the future study of Calculus. At the same time, the project will study the impact on cognitive training of working memory associated with STEM success. The research design for the project will be quasi-experimental, with three College Algebra and one pre-Calculus classes randomly assigned to the treatment condition, and four classes randomly assigned to the control condition. Dependent measures include course grades, standardized assessment of mathematics ability, attitudinal change, level of motivation and engagement, and semester grade point average. Initial data will be analyzed with a factorial multivariate analysis of covariance. The impact of the cognitive and psychosocial variables on mathematics performance will be analyzed using structural equation modeling. This is the first study of the impact of the Algebra Project pedagogy at the college level. Results from the study will be broadly disseminated to other institutions of higher education, particularly those that have students entering college, but not prepared to take Calculus.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: HIST BLACK COLLEGES AND UNIV | Award Amount: 195.21K | Year: 2014

Research Initiation Awards provide support for junior and mid-career faculty at Historically Black Colleges and Universities who are building new research programs or redirecting and rebuilding existing research programs. It is expected that the award helps to further the faculty members research capability and effectiveness, improves research and teaching at his home institution, and involves undergraduate students in research experiences. The award to Virginia State University has potential broader impact in a number of areas. The goal of the project is to develop new variational methods to investigate orbits of unusual star system, such as quadruple star systems. New teaching materials with advanced mathematical tools, such as symbolic computation, will be developed in the field of celestial mechanics. This project will also enhance the research experience and training of undergraduate students at Virginia State University.

This project seeks mathematical solutions to some questions on the central configurations, the new variational method with Structural Prescribed Boundary Conditions (SPBC) and the existence of some new periodic orbits in celestial mechanics. The Star Pentagon choreography has been numerically discovered and theoretically proven by the variational method in the Newtonian planar four-body problem. The project now aims to build a complete mathematical and computational framework for the new variational method with SPBC for this system. General criteria will be established for SPBC which can generate classical solutions without singularities.

The second goal of this project is to use the variational method with SPBC to search for new periodic solutions. The application of the method to search for periodic or quasi-periodic solutions to systems with three unequal masses was inspired by the 2011 discovery of the existence of a planet with two stars. The numerical solutions may guide the understanding of why such an unusual system exists. These computational techniques can then be applied to search for periodic and quasi-periodic solutions for any n-body problem. The results in developing and applying the new methods promise exciting examples and practical techniques to advance the understanding of the dynamical behavior in celestial mechanics.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Continuing grant | Program: | Phase: DISCOVERY RESEARCH K-12 | Award Amount: 1.51M | Year: 2016

Algebra continues to serve as a gatekeeper and potential barrier for high school students. The Algebra Project Mathematics Content and Pedagogy Initiative (APMCPI) will scale up, implement and assess the efficacy of interventions in K-12 mathematics education based on the well-established Algebra Project (AP) pedagogical framework. The APMCPI project team is comprised of four HBCUs (Virginia State University, Dillard University, Xavier University, Lincoln University), the Southern Initiative Algebra Project (SIAP), and four school districts that are closely aligned with partner universities. The purpose of the Algebra Project is to improve performance and participation in mathematics by members of students in distressed school districts, particularly those with a large population of low-income students from underserved populations including African American and Hispanics. The project will provide professional development and implement the Algebra Project in four districts and study the impact on student learning. The research results will inform the nations learning how to improve mathematics achievement for all children, particularly those in distressed inner-city school districts.

The study builds on a prior pilot project with a 74% increase in students who passed the state exam. In the early stages of this project, teachers in four districts closely associated with the four universities will receive Algebra Project professional development in Summer Teacher Institutes with ongoing support during the academic year, including a community development plan. The professional development is designed to help teachers combine mathematical problem solving with context-rich lessons, which both strengthen and integrate teachers understanding of key concepts in mathematics so that they better engage their students. The project also will focus on helping teachers establish a framework for mathematically substantive, conceptually-rich and experientially-grounded conversations with students. The first year of the study will begin a longitudinal quasi-experimental, explanatory, mixed-method design. Over the course of the project, researchers will follow cohorts who are in grade-levels 5 through 12 in Year 1 to allow analyses across crucial transition periods - grades 5 to 6; grades 8 to 9; and grades 12 to college/workforce. Student and teacher data will be collected in September of Project Year 1, and in May of each project year, providing five data points for each student and teacher participant. Student data will include student attitude, belief, anxiety, and relationship to mathematics and science, in addition to student learning outcome measures. Teacher data will include content knowledge, attitudes and beliefs, and practices. Qualitative data will provide information on the implementation in both the experimental and control conditions. Analysis will include hierarchical linear modeling and multivariate analysis of covariance.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: HIST BLACK COLLEGES AND UNIV | Award Amount: 299.63K | Year: 2016

Research Initiation Awards provide support for junior and mid-career faculty at Historically Black Colleges and Universities who are building new research programs or redirecting and rebuilding existing research programs. It is expected that the award helps to further the faculty members research capability and effectiveness, improves research and teaching at his home institution, and involves undergraduate students in research experiences. The award to Virginia State University has potential broader impact in a number of areas. The goal of the project is to study the existence and uniqueness of solutions of systems of strongly coupled partial differential equations given an appropriate initial configuration and to study the long time behavior of the solutions. The models have wide applications in areas such as aerospace engineering, civil engineering, and environmental sciences. Undergraduate students will gain research experiences and courses in ordinary and partial differential equations will be enhanced.

The goal of the project is to study the control, optimization and stability analysis centered on physically significant systems composed of dynamical interactive inhomogeneous structures, whose behavior is governed by nonlinear systems of coupled partial differential equations (PDEs). The two PDE-components act on separate and adjacent media. Two specific models under consideration are: (1) Fluid-structure interaction (FSI), where the model consists of the Navier Stokes equation coupled on the interface with dynamic elasticity; and (2) Structure acoustic interaction (SAI), in an acoustic chamber with an elastic or thermoelastic shell as a flexible wall. The SAI model consists of hybrid coupling between an acoustic wave equation and a shell equation which is possibly nonlinear. Control theoretic issues to be studied are: (a) stabilization, particularly stabilization of unstable equilibria in FSI and stabilization of SAI subject to weak dissipation; and (b) well-posedness, particularly seeking suitable feedback control such that the solution to FSI with moving interface is well-posed. Both models could be generalized to other structures where the developed mathematical technology could be applied to other coupled systems.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: HIST BLACK COLLEGES AND UNIV | Award Amount: 389.79K | Year: 2016

The Historically Black Colleges and Universities Undergraduate Program (HBCU-UP) through Targeted Infusion Projects supports the development, implementation, and study of evidence-based innovative models and approaches for improving the preparation and success of HBCU undergraduate students so that they may pursue science, technology, engineering or mathematics (STEM) graduate programs and/or careers. The project at Virginia State University seeks to expand, adapt and study a cross-disciplinary academic intervention aimed at incoming freshmen that have indicated an interest in STEM with the goal of improving retention and persistence in STEM majors. The activities and strategies are evidence-based and a strong plan for formative and summative evaluation is part of the project.

Through the implementation of the interventions, the Phenomenological Variable of the Ecological Systems Theory (PVEST) developmental model will be tested for validity. A variety of personal factors that influence academic behavior will be studied in African American students in order to strengthen the factors that are most associated with successful academic performance. The project will support 1) formation of successful academic habits, 2) academic identity formation, 3) mitigation of self-handicapping through emotion regulation, and 4) expanding the brand of Virginia State University to include high academic achievement as a key part of the college experience. Both the intervention and the results of the study of the developmental model should be useful in developing models that support freshman integration into STEM majors at other institutions.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: HIST BLACK COLLEGES AND UNIV | Award Amount: 73.70K | Year: 2016

The Historically Black Colleges and Universities - Undergraduate Program (HBCU-UP) funds conferences as a means of discussing and disseminating best practices in science, technology, engineering and mathematics education at HBCUs. The goal of the conference at Virginia State University is to review successful programs at selected HBCUs that help retain students from groups underrepresented in STEM majors with a focus on mathematics preparation. The conference allows for the sharing of information about student skill development programs and to discuss replication by other institutions.

The programs to be reviewed at the conferences include: the K-12 Algebra Project pedagogy for college-level mathematics courses; Project Knowledge which focuses on building academic skills and motivation during the critical first three semesters of college; partnerships of HBCUs with local school districts; and interventions using cognitive skills training that improve the mathematics performance of African American college students. Specific aims are to: disseminate information on effective interventions for improving mathematics performance in African American STEM majors; provide opportunities for participants to share best practices that are having an impact at HBCUs; and provide networking opportunities for future faculty training in these interventions so that they can be applied at other institutions. The project is informed by an on-going evaluation.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: ROBERT NOYCE SCHOLARSHIP PGM | Award Amount: 1.45M | Year: 2012

Partners for this Track 1 project to produce 41 high school mathematics teachers include Virginia State University (VSU) as the lead institution, three community colleges (John Tyler and J. Sargeant Reynolds Community Colleges and Richard Bland Junior College) and two school districts (Petersburg and Chesterfield County Public Schools). Their overall goal is to recruit, prepare and sustain teachers, from underserved populations, who are capable of creating professional, positive, research-informed, STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) responsive, technologically-intensive and effective mathematics learning environments for all students.

The Scholars are being recruited from three specific populations: (1) VSUs current STEM majors, (2) students pursuing certificates or degrees in STEM-related disciplines at the partnering two-year community colleges, and (3) juniors and seniors at local high schools. As a recruiting tool, summer internships are being offered to 100 freshman and sophomore students from both VSU and the cooperating community colleges. The internship includes, among other activities: (1) a three credit mathematics course; (2) reinforcement of mathematics skills; (3) introduction to web technology; and (4) an overview of STEM careers. The program for the scholars emphasizes community building and includes: (1) faculty and peer mentoring; (2) preparation for all requirements of secondary licensure, including the Praxis; (3) resume writing and interviewing skills; (4) an introduction to useful technology and grant writing; (5) participation in professional organizations and meetings; and (6) team building. Support for the Scholars during their first three years of teaching, includes: (1) a Mentor /Scholar Teacher Professional Community comprised of new teachers, mentors and faculty at VSU and the partnering community colleges designed to provide individual, group, and internet housed contact among the participants; (2) summer mini-workshops involving current and past Scholars, exemplary mathematics high school teachers, and VSU and partnering community college faculty that focus on effective pedagogy, problem solving, diversity preparation, technology, and classroom management; and (3) a funded one credit-hour hybrid course.

Intellectual Merit: Information from the research-based evaluation of the project will be widely disseminated through contacts in the state and through presentations at professional organizations.

Broader Impact: The nature of the student population at the institutions involved and the emphasis of the program on service at underserved schools insures creation of a diverse effective set of secondary mathematics teachers throughout the schools served by this project.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Continuing grant | Program: | Phase: HIST BLACK COLLEGES AND UNIV | Award Amount: 323.49K | Year: 2014

The National Science Foundations (NSF) Historically Black Colleges and Universities-Undergraduate Program (HBCU-UP) is providing support to Virginia State University (VSU) through its Targeted Infusion Project (TIP) funding opportunity to increase the quality of science teaching at the K-6 grade level. This teacher preparation project represents a joint venture between the College of Natural and Health Sciences and College of Education as well as local school districts in central Virginia to increase interest, pedagogical skills, confidence and expertise of preservice elementary education teachers to teach science utilizing research-based instructional methods. The project will pair preservice teachers with science majors and biology faculty to work collaboratively on interdisciplinary projects, allow for field-based experiences that incorporate applied knowledge, practices, and hands-on learning by exposing preservice teachers to practical application of science concepts, enable preservice teachers participation in professional development conferences and activities; and enhance VSUs College of Education Teaching and Learning Resource Center with science resources. The project supports both formal and informal learning for thirty (30) pre-service teachers over a three-year period.

The project will be evaluated using the Teaching Science as Inquiry (TSI) survey instrument to measure teachers self-efficacy as it relates specifically to classroom practice.

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