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Bristol, VA, United States

Virginia Intermont College was a private, four-year liberal arts college in Bristol, Virginia. Founded in 1884 to create additional education opportunities for women, the College had been coeducational since 1972. It experienced significant financial difficulties during the last years of its existence, was denied accreditation in 2013, and announced its closure on May 20, 2014.The name "Intermont" was a reference to the College's mountain setting. The Holston Range, which merges into the Blue Ridge Mountains, can be seen from the campus in Bristol, Virginia, part of the Tri-Cities region, which also includes Johnson City and Kingsport, Tennessee. Wikipedia.


Chakraborty D.,Virginia Intermont College | Peleg A.,State University of New York at Buffalo | Jung J.-H.,State University of New York at Buffalo
Physical Review A - Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics | Year: 2013

We study propagation and on-off switching of two colliding soliton sequences in the presence of second-order dispersion, Kerr nonlinearity, linear loss, cubic gain, and quintic loss. Employing a Lotka-Volterra (LV) model for dynamics of soliton amplitudes along with simulations with two perturbed coupled nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equations, we show that stable long-distance propagation can be achieved for a wide range of the gain-loss coefficients, including values that are outside of the perturbative regime. Furthermore, we demonstrate robust on-off and off-on switching of one of the sequences by an abrupt change in the ratio of cubic gain and quintic loss coefficients, and extend the results to pulse sequences with periodically alternating phases. Our study significantly strengthens the recently found relation between collision dynamics of sequences of NLS solitons and population dynamics in LV models, and indicates that the relation might be further extended to solitary waves of the cubic-quintic Ginzburg-Landau equation. © 2013 American Physical Society.


Graham-Thiers P.M.,Virginia Intermont College | Bowen L.K.,Virginia Intermont College
Journal of Animal Science | Year: 2011

Plasma AA in horses fed either an allhay or a hay and grain diet in a traditional format have not been investigated. Eight horses were divided into 2 groups: a hay group fed only grass hay or a hay and a grain group (HG) fed in a crossover design for two 5-wk periods. After the first period, horses were fasted overnight, followed by feeding with blood sampling every hour for 6 h. A 4-d total fecal and urine collection to evaluate N balance followed. A 10-d washout period separated the 5-wk feeding periods, during which horses switched diets. The second period was also followed by fasting, feeding, blood sampling, and a 4-d collection period. Horses consumed 840 g of CP in the hay group and 865 g of CP in the HG group. Horses in the hay group had a 2.4±2.4 g/d N balance, which was not different from 0 (P = 0.34), whereas horses in the HG group had 5.4±2.4 g/d N balance, which was different from 0 (P = 0.045). Fecal N excretion was greater for the hay group compared with the HG group (hay = 51.1±1.3 g/d and HG = 45.5±1.3 g/d; P = 0.011), and urine N excretion was greater for the HG group compared with the hay group (hay = 79.3±2.8 g/d and HG = 89.2±2.8 g/d; P = 0.026). Plasma AA concentrations were greater in the HG group compared with the hay group for Met (P = 0.001), Lys (P = 0.001), Ile (P = 0.047), Arg (P < 0.001), Gln (P = 0.009), and Orn (P = 0.002). Plasma concentrations were less for the HG group compared with the hay group for Thr (P < 0.001) and Ala (P < 0.001). Plasma concentrations of urea were greater for the HG group compared with the hay group (P < 0.001), whereas 3-methyl-histidine concentrations were greater for the hay group compared with the HG group (P < 0.001). The effect of diet on the excretion of N via feces vs. urine in the hay and HG groups is typical. The early increases in the plasma concentrations of Met, Val, Ile, Leu, Phe, Lys, Arg, and Ala during the postfeeding phase are most likely due to increased foregut digestibility as well as a greater quality AA profile in the grain. The greater concentrations of Thr, Leu, and Val later in the postfeeding phase for the hay group most likely reflects slower digestion because of prolonged consumption time compared with the HG group. Improved N balance observed in the HG group supports the fact that the HG group had more available AA via the AA profile and foregut digestibility of the HG diet. Despite the fact that both groups consumed similar amounts of CP, the AA profile and availability affected N balance. © 2011 American Society of Animal Science. All rights reserved.


Graham-Thiers P.M.,Virginia Intermont College | Wilson J.A.,Berry College | Haught J.,Virginia Intermont College | Goldberg M.,Berry College
Professional Animal Scientist | Year: 2010

The objective of this study was to evaluate relationships between diet, plasma, and muscle amino acids for horses in maintenance, exercise, and growth. Eight horses in each maintenance (MH) and exercise (EH) group were fed diets for 8 wk, whereas 6 weanlings in the growth (GH) group were fed diets for 4 wk. Blood samples and muscle biopsies were taken at the beginning of the study from the MH and EH groups and at the end of the study for all groups. Plasma urea-N and lysine concentrations were higher for the EH group than for the MH group, whereas plasma urea-N concentrations were higher for the GH group than for the MH group. Plasma histidine and 3-methyl-histidine concentrations for the GH group were higher than for the MH group at the conclusion of the study. Poststudy muscle methionine concentrations for the EH group were lower than for the MH group. Correlations were found between plasma and muscle concentrations of urea-N for the MH and EH groups. Plasma and muscle correlations also existed with serine for the EH group and with threonine, leucine, valine, histidine, phenylalanine, and serine for the GH group. Fewer correlations for the MH and EH groups may indicate an excess of amino acids in the diet in relation to needs, whereas the large number of correlations for the GH group may indicate a closer relationship between supply of amino acids in the diet and need by the body. More exploration of this area is needed for horses in all functions. © 2010 American Registry of Professional Animal Scientists.


Graham-Thiers P.M.,Virginia Intermont College | Wilson J.A.,Berry College | Haught J.,Virginia Intermont College | Goldberg M.,Berry College
Professional Animal Scientist | Year: 2010

Amino acid requirements have not been extensively studied in pregnant or lactating mares. The objective of this study was to evaluate relationships between dietary, plasma, and muscle amino acids for horses in maintenance, gestation, and lactation. Twenty mares were divided into 3 groups: maintenance (MM), pregnancy (PM), and lactation (LM). Mares were fed their respective diets for 8 wk. Initial and final blood samples and muscle biopsies were obtained. Poststudy plasma urea-N and 3-methyl-histidine concentrations were higher for the PM group compared with the MM group. Poststudy plasma concentrations of arginine and urea-N were higher, whereas 3-methyl-histidine was lower for the LM group compared with the MM group. Poststudy muscle urea-N concentrations were lower in the PM group but were higher in the LM group compared with the MM group. There was a correlation between poststudy plasma and muscle urea-N concentrations for the MM group. Correlations between poststudy plasma and muscle concentrations of lysine, threonine, isoleucine, leucine, phenylalanine, valine, urea-N, and 3-methylhistidine were observed in the PM group. Correlations between poststudy plasma and muscle concentrations of lysine and urea-N were found for the LM group. Lysine and phenylalanine intakes were both correlated with their respective poststudy plasma and milk concentrations in the LM group. The many plasma and muscle amino acid correlations between the PM and LM groups may indicate a close relationship between amino acid demand and supply from the amino acid pool. The amino acid needs of the lactating and pregnant mare warrant further investigation. © 2010 American Registry of Professional Animal Scientists.

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