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News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Leading the trade in tech innovation, the free Virtual Diamond Boutique™ app is rewriting the language of the industry. The company’s new logo demonstrates a commitment to diversified offerings, with five retail pillars. Meant to increase the bottom line, VDB gives options and opportunities to designers and storeowners. The purple and white logo remains distinguishable within its round stamp, encircled in silver, with the words “Your New Storefront” underneath. Meant to evoke the look customers are used to, with a modern twist, the five pillars are stamped below, each with an identifying color and image. From left to right they represent: purple/diamond for the diamond section, blue/table of a gemstone for the colored gemstone section, green/ring for the jewelry section, red/camera for studio, and multicolor/V for VIMS (VDB Inventory Management System). Pillar 1: Diamonds. The search that started it all, VDB’s diamond platform has hundreds of thousands of inventory options, cutting down on research and increasing the potential for those looking to expand their listing resources. Vendors can upload their stock seamlessly, including full certificate reports. Pillar 2: Colored Gemstones. Fun and easy to use, VDB’s newly launched colored gemstone section is revolutionizing sourcing. Search by stone type, color, shape, origin and budget, amongst dozens of other options, as with the diamond search. In-app real time messaging and communications allow for buying, holds and memos with immediate results. Pillar 3: Jewelry. Coming this fall, VDB will be bringing jewelry to the mix. For now, the move can be anticipated in the mint green pillar, but stay tuned for the third quarter launch, just in time for holiday stocking. At JCK, the jewelry platform will be demoed on Android, providing a first look on how to move ready to wear stock with ease. Pillar 4: Studio. During the Vegas trade shows, the industry will have its first look at Studio. The product itself will officially launch in a few months time, but show attendees can drop by booth L112 at JCK, located across from the food court, to catch a glance of what the buzz is about. Now, a smartphone can be used to eliminate the need for expensive photography equipment. Think 360 degrees of in-house creative media, scaled. Pillar 5: VIMS. VDB Inventory Management System (VIMS) will be officially launching in Las Vegas—another reason why stopping by is a “must do.” This cloud-based system will seamlessly integrate the entire VDB app. With a login, managing inventory on the app, assigning other users, changing markups, uploading goods, and alternating between environments as desired, is effortless. Tanya Nisguretsky, CEO and Founding Partner of Virtual Diamond Boutique, says of the rebranding initiative, “We have decided to take an omnipillar approach to help the industry from all sides. Virtual Diamond Boutique’s rebranding has five moving parts to help retailers better promote themselves, making it affordable to create marketing materials in-house. It helps vendors list inventory virtually, with better reach and organization than traditional pen and paper. The only cost to storeowners is the time taken to educate sales staff. As someone who has been in the industry for years, my team and I understand the struggles, and we wanted to create a product that worked to benefit everyone, from selling to sourcing.” Accessible 24/7, from anyplace, the free Virtual Diamond Boutique can be accessed on a desktop, or on the App or Google Play stores for the iPhone or Android. Learn about how to sign up and get a free username and password at http://www.vdbapp.com. Additional training tools are also available on the website. The Virtual Diamond Boutique™ (VDB) is the trade’s cutting edge app for visually sourcing diamonds and colored gemstones. Available across Apple, Google and Android, the omnichannel tool is reinventing B2B inventory listings and purchases. To learn more about Virtual Diamond Boutique™, visit http://www.vdapp.com. For answers to any questions, contact by phone at 212-221-0975 or email info@vdbapp.com. For information regarding this release, please contact: Olga Gonzalez                                                                             Pietra PR olga(at)pietrapr.com                             212-913-9761


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

A new analysis of population trends among coastal sharks of the southeast U.S. shows that all but one of the seven species studied are increasing in abundance. The gains follow enactment of fishing regulations in the early 1990s after decades of declining shark numbers. Scientists estimate that over-fishing of sharks along the southeast U.S. coast--which began in earnest following the release of Jaws in 1975 and continued through the 1980s--had reduced populations by 60-99% compared to un-fished levels. In response, NOAA's National Marine Fishery Service in 1993 enacted a management plan for shark fisheries that limited both commercial and recreational landings. Now, says lead scientist Cassidy Peterson, a graduate student at William & Mary's Virginia Institute of Marine Science, "We've shown that after over two decades of management measures, coastal shark populations are finally starting to recover and reclaim their position as top predators, or regulators of their ecosystem. Our research suggests we can begin to shift away from the era of 'doom and gloom' regarding shark status in the United States." Joining Peterson in the study, published in the latest issue of Fish and Fisheries, were VIMS professor Rob Latour, Carolyn Belcher of the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Dana Bethea and William Driggers III of NOAA's Southeast Fisheries Science Center, and Bryan Frazier of the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources. The researchers say their study--based on modeling of combined data from six different scientific surveys conducted along the US East Coast and in the Gulf of Mexico between 1975 and 2014--provides a more accurate and optimistic outlook than previous studies based on commercial fishery landings or surveys in a single location. "Data from shark long-lining operations or shark bycatch can be suspect," says Peterson, "because what looks like a change in abundance might instead be due to changes in fishing gear, target species, market forces, or other factors." Research surveys are scientifically designed to remove these biases. Survey crews purposefully sample a random grid rather than visiting known shark hot spots, and strive to use the exact same gear and methods year after year to ensure consistency in their results. But even with these safeguards, data from a single survey often aren't enough to capture population trends for an entire shark species, whose members may occupy diverse habitats and migrate to different and far-flung areas depending on age and sex. "Because many shark species undergo vast migrations and have complex life cycles," says Peterson, "it's not uncommon for results from different surveys to conflict. Producing an estimate of total abundance requires combining data from different surveys--sometimes from several states or even countries--and applying intricate stock-assessment models." For the current study, the scientists combined data from six different shark surveys: the VIMS Longline Survey, the SouthEast Area Monitoring and Assessment Program's South Atlantic Coastal Trawl Survey, the South Carolina Coastal Longline Survey, the Georgia Red Drum Longline Survey, the Southeast Fisheries Science Center's Longline Survey, and the Gulf of Mexico Shark Pupping and Nursery Area Gillnet Survey. "Our study represents the most comprehensive analysis of patterns in abundance ever conducted for shark species common to our area and the Southeast coast," says Latour, who directs the longline survey at VIMS. Established in 1973, it is the world's longest running fishery independent monitoring program for sharks, skates, and rays. By pooling and modeling data from all six surveys, the researchers were able to estimate population trends for seven of the region's most common coastal species: the large-bodied sandbar, blacktip, spinner, and tiger sharks, and the smaller Atlantic sharpnose, blacknose, and bonnethead sharks. The results of the analysis were clear, says Peterson. "All the large-bodied sharks showed similar population trends, with decreasing abundance from the mid-1970s to the early 1990s, then a multi-year period of low abundance, and recent indications of recovery from past exploitation." All but one population of small coastal sharks also increased in abundance. The exception was blacknose sharks in the Gulf of Mexico, which decreased from the onset of records in 1989 until the study's end in 2014. This species is known to be susceptible to by-catch within the trawl fishery for Gulf shrimp. The blacknose population along the Atlantic coast of the southeast U.S. actually increased during the same period. The overall population trends make biological sense, says Latour. "The large-bodied species saw the greatest initial declines, both because they were highly sought by anglers, and because they mature late and produce relatively few pups. Their slow growth rate also helps explain the pause in their recovery following the onset of fishing regulations in the early 1990s." The smaller shark species, whose higher growth rates make them less susceptible to fishing pressure, saw lesser declines and more rapid recoveries. The team also found a correlation between shark numbers and both fishing pressure and large-scale climatic patterns. Funding for the study was provided by NOAA Fisheries, the NMFS Highly Migratory Species Office, the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission, the South Carolina Saltwater Recreational Fishing License Funds, and the Federal Assistance for Interjurisdictional Fisheries Program.


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

HOUSTON, TX--(Marketwired - February 22, 2017) - Omega Protein ( : OME) has become the newest industry partner at the Science Center for Marine Fisheries (SCeMFiS). SCeMFiS is a partnership between the fishing industry, the Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS) and the University of Southern Mississippi, and is part of the National Science Foundation's Industry/University Cooperative Research Center program. SCeMFiS connects the industry with the most up-to-date scientific and academic resources. In joining SCeMFiS, Omega Protein partners with an organization that shares its commitment to sustainable fishery management. It includes private and publicly traded companies, trade organizations, non-profits and government agencies. Some of the non-industry members include the National Marine Fisheries Service -- Northeast Fisheries Science Center, SeaWatch International and the National Fisheries Institute. "I want to extend our sincere appreciation to Omega Protein as they become a collaborating member of SCeMFiS. The future of our fishing communities depends upon sustainable fisheries, and we believe it is part of responsible fishing today to be making these investments in research," said Jeff Kaelin, who sits on SCeMFiS's Industry Advisory Board (IAB) of Officers and is head of Government Relations for Lund's Fisheries. "We are pleased Omega Protein will be joining us in this important work." SCeMFiS is responsible for several projects that have led to major breakthroughs in fisheries science, such as a 2015 report on improving the accuracy of marine mammal stock assessments, as well as measuring the impact marine mammal regulations have on East Coast and Gulf fisheries. "Since SCeMFiS' inception, Omega Protein has had respect for the organization and has continued to be impressed by the quality of the research being conducted," said Omega Protein Director of Public Affairs Ben Landry. "The objective of SCeMFiS is to develop research proposals to address scientific uncertainty in order to develop best management practices. We felt that there was no better group with which to partner than SCeMFiS, and we are excited to join." SCeMFiS currently has 17 projects underway covering a broad spectrum of fisheries issues. Several of these projects are especially relevant to the work of Omega Protein. One project in particular is a winter survey of menhaden in the Mid-Atlantic, which aims to "address data deficiencies and better inform the menhaden assessment," according to Mr. Kaelin. New SCeMFiS members are required to be affiliated with an academic institution, and Omega Protein has chosen to partner with the Virginia Institute of Marine Science. Roger Mann, a Professor of Marine Science at VIMS and the Virginia Site Director at SCeMFiS, has signed the agreement. According to Dr. Mann, there are many ways industry members benefit from partnering with SCeMFiS. "Members gain access to an international group of experts who can focus on technical problems that are challenging your sector of the fishing industry," said Dr. Mann. He also noted that SCeMFiS follows the research standards of the National Science Foundation, the "gold standard" in US scientific research. "This places the results of any IAB funded effort beyond reproach as these results are used to advance the goals of sustainable harvest." Omega Protein is the 11th industry partner to join the SCeMFiS team. Other partners include Atlantic Capes Fisheries, Bumblebee Foods/Snow's, Garden State Seafood Association, LaMonica Fine Foods, Lund's Fisheries Incorporated, and Surfside Seafood Products. Access to this premier scientific resource will ensure that Omega Protein remains at the forefront of the latest developments in fisheries science management. As a new industry partner at SCeMFiS, Omega Protein can continue to expand upon its current commitment to sustainable and responsible fishing. Omega Protein Corporation ( : OME) is a century old nutritional product company that develops, produces and delivers healthy products throughout the world to improve the nutritional integrity of foods, dietary supplements and animal feeds. Omega Protein's mission is to help people lead healthier lives with better nutrition through sustainably sourced ingredients such as highly-refined specialty oils, specialty proteins products and nutraceuticals. The Company operates seven manufacturing facilities located in the United States, Canada and Europe. The Company also uses over 30 vessels to harvest menhaden, a fish abundantly found off of the coasts of the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico. Its website is www.omegaprotein.com.


News Article | December 9, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency today announced two major grants designed to help Virginia protect and restore its wetlands. These watery habitats--which range from forested swamps to tidal marshes--nurture countless species of wildlife and play a key role in keeping pollutants from flowing into Chesapeake Bay. One grant is a $356,000 award to William & Mary's Virginia Institute of Marine Science and its Center for Coastal Resources Management (CCRM). The other provides $750,000 to Virginia's Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ). Both grants will support three years of effort to advance and refine the Commonwealth's latest State Wetlands Program Plan--a blueprint for not only preventing any net loss of wetlands, as specified by the U.S. Clean Water Act, but for increasing Virginia's wetland acreage and ecological function. "Wetlands play a significant role in protecting our nation's water supply," said EPA Regional Administrator Shawn M. Garvin during a press conference on the VIMS campus in Gloucester Point. "By taking action to protect and restore these valuable resources, DEQ and VIMS are protecting sources of our drinking water, preventing flooding, and making us more resilient to climate change." Also speaking at the press conference was Dr. Mark Luckenbach, VIMS' associate dean of research and advisory services, who thanked EPA for "generous support that will allow us to continue guiding the informed management of Virginia's threatened wetland resources." Dr. Carl Hershner, VIMS professor and CCRM director, says "the funding will help us determine which wetlands are most vulnerable to climate change, and how we can maximize their continued capacity to provide important ecosystem services." Wetlands serve as nursery and feeding grounds for waterfowl, finfish, and shellfish; protect against flooding and erosion; absorb silt and pollutants; and provide for recreational opportunities. Dr. Donna Bilkovic, project lead and a research associate professor with CCRM, says the new grant will expand on previous EPA awards that helped VIMS focus on headwater wetlands. "We'll be developing a framework for assessing the vulnerability of wetlands along a continuum from headwaters to tidal salt marshes," she says. "We'll use both field data and modeling to pinpoint the coastal wetlands that are most vulnerable to climate change, and to identify management options for their preservation or managed retreat in light of rising seas." The VIMS team will also inform decision-making by mapping historic changes in the geography and plant life of Virginia's wetlands. They'll do so by comparing wetland conditions as recorded in a tidal-marsh inventory conducted by CCRM in the early 1970s with similar measures recorded recently and planned for the next few years. They'll focus this effort in two distinct wetland settings: along the entire length of the York River on Chesapeake Bay's western shore, and at coastal sites along Virginia's Eastern Shore. The basic idea, say Bilkovic and Hershner, is to give local planners the data they need to make informed decisions regarding development and preservation. "A commercial or residential development that would have minimal impact on a healthy wetland could significantly affect a wetland that's already stressed by warmer temperatures, more intense rainstorms, rising sea level, and invasive species," says Hershner. Adds Bilkovic, "A wetland that 's subjected to high wave energy and is surrounded by lots of paved surfaces will be more sensitive to both climate change and human stressors. But if it's in a low-lying area with a steady supply of sediment, we might give it a chance to survive by providing the space to migrate landward." The grant to Virginia's Department of Environmental Quality will fund development of strategies to help planners better identify and protect wetlands of high ecological value. High-value wetlands include the forested headwater swamps that capture pollutants and sediments before they can enter the tributaries that feed Chesapeake Bay. DEQ Director David K. Paylor says, "Our wetland resources play a critical role in environmental health, and Virginia appreciates the opportunity to make the best possible use of this grant. Providing much-needed attention to aquatic resources is a key priority in our efforts to help restore and protect the quality of our wetlands and improve climate resiliency." One focus of DEQ's effort will be to expand and upgrade the Wetland Condition Assessment Tool, or WetCAT. Developed in collaboration with VIMS, WetCAT is an online mapping tool that helps people throughout Virginia minimize wetland impacts when making planning decisions. David Davis, director of DEQ's Office of Wetlands and Stream Protection, says his staff will use the EPA funds to help "extend WetCAT to include online regulatory data from the US Army Corps of Engineers, a modification specifically requested by various user groups." Dr. Kirk Havens, assistant director of CCRM, played a key role in developing WetCAT and joins Hershner, Bilkovic, and CCRM colleague Marcia Berman as collaborators on DEQ's EPA-funded project. Havens agrees the EPA funding will help make WetCAT even more effective. "It will give users the ability to assess the condition of even the smallest wetland, and determine how it might be impacted by changes in land cover within its watershed," he says. "The overall goal," adds Havens, "is to provide easy access to comprehensive local information to meet the needs of planners, regulators, and property owners."


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

A new study led by researchers at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science links a long-term decline in Chesapeake Bay's eelgrass beds to both deteriorating water quality and rising summertime temperatures. It also shows that loss of the habitat and other benefits that eelgrass provides comes at a staggering ecological and economic cost. Lead scientist Jonathan Lefcheck, a VIMS post-doctoral researcher, says "Not only have we lost a huge ecological resource, there have been real economic and recreational consequences for the Bay area's nearly 20 million residents. Blue crab fisheries, for example, have probably lost a year or more of catch based on the amount of eelgrass we've already lost. For silver perch, it's 10-20 years. In all, we estimate the potential economic cost to citizens at $1-2 billion." The study -- based on a comparison of VIMS' 31-year record of seagrass abundance and the Chesapeake Bay Program's long-term record of Bay water quality -- appeared in the February 3, 2017 issue of Global Change Biology. Co-authors include Professor Robert "JJ" Orth and scientist David Wilcox of VIMS, Dr. Rebecca Murphy of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, and Scott Marion of the Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife. The team's findings confirm a long-standing hypothesis that declines in Bay eelgrass stem from decreased water clarity, which in turn stems from increases in human activities that lead to nutrient pollution and sediment runoff. Orth, who initiated VIMS' annual Seagrass Monitoring and Assessment program in 1984, says, "It's a classic case of 'habitat squeeze.' Declining water clarity has cut eelgrass cover in half within deeper beds during the last two decades, so that the mean depth of eelgrass beds is now almost 5 inches shallower." That might not sound like much, but given Chesapeake Bay's gently sloping bottom, a 5-inch change means the Bay's fringing eelgrass beds have contracted shoreward by more than 500 feet since 1984. In fact, says Orth, it is now rare to find eelgrass growing in water deeper than about 3 feet in Chesapeake Bay. At the same time, the analysis reveals that more frequent heat waves are impacting eelgrass populations even in these shallow-water areas. The most extreme temperature-related losses were observed in 2006, when eelgrass declined 58% following the sweltering summer of 2005, and in 2011, when the VIMS team measured a 41% decline following the steamy summer of 2010. One bright spot is that eelgrass is currently able to recover rapidly after these sharp declines. In the year following the 2005-6 dieback, eelgrass acreage increased by 55%, and by 2009 had reached total cover exceeding that observed just before the dieback took place. A similar rebound took place after 2010-11, with eelgrass returning to pre-dieback acreage in less than two years. The scientists warn, however, that future recoveries are much less certain given current trends towards murkier, warmer water. They also stress that their analysis focuses on eelgrass. Other underwater baygrasses, widgeongrass in particular, have experienced recent increases in Bay coverage. But widgeongrass is known for boom-bust cycles that could quickly reverse these gains, and is unlikely to replace the ecosystem services provided by eelgrass due to its different growth habit and restriction to fresher waters. "Our observations suggest eelgrass is responding to two main factors," says Orth. "Declining water clarity has gradually reduced eelgrass cover during the past two decades, primarily in deeper beds where lack of light already limits growth. In shallow beds, it's more that heat waves are stressing the plants, leading to the sharp drops we've seen in recent summers." But it's the combined effect of these two factors that gives the researchers their greatest concern. Says Lefcheck, "Declining clarity plus these hot summers is a real double-whammy for eelgrass." That's because eelgrasses--which already need more light to survive than related land plants -- require even more light as water temperatures rise. "In effect," says Orth, "any increase in water temperature subjects shallowly growing eelgrass plants to light conditions similar to those that have already largely eliminated their deeper-water cohorts." The team's analysis shows the mean summertime water temperature in the lower Chesapeake Bay has already increased by more than 2 degrees Fahrenheit since 1984--from 76.8° to 79.5°F -- and that the frequency of extreme warm spells with water temperatures exceeding 82° has doubled in the last decade. As global warming continues to raise the area's water temperatures -- a conservative estimate is a further 3.5° F increase by 2040 -- the team predicts a further 38% decline in eelgrass cover. And if water clarity follows its current downward trajectory during the next 30 years, eelgrass would decline an additional 84%. When both declining clarity and warming are considered, say the researchers, the predicted increases in temperature and turbidity would result in a loss of 95% of Bay eelgrass--a near total eradication. To combat this downward trend, the researchers call on resource managers and policymakers to build recognition of global warming into their management strategies. "We propose that managers must increase their water-quality targets at the local and regional levels to offset losses caused by global factors outside their immediate control," says Orth. "Our analysis suggests that eelgrass could still persist in the face of moderate increases in temperature, if the water remains clear enough" adds Lefcheck. "But that will only happen if managers adopt an integrated perspective, and continue with their efforts to curb inputs into the Bay." Funding for the study comes from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Chesapeake Bay Program, NOAA's Virginia Coastal Program, the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality, and the Maryland Department of Natural Resources.


News Article | February 28, 2017
Site: phys.org

Scientists estimate that over-fishing of sharks along the southeast U.S. coast—which began in earnest following the release of Jaws in 1975 and continued through the 1980s—had reduced populations by 60-99% compared to un-fished levels. In response, NOAA's National Marine Fishery Service in 1993 enacted a management plan for shark fisheries that limited both commercial and recreational landings. Now, says lead scientist Cassidy Peterson, a graduate student at William & Mary's Virginia Institute of Marine Science, "We've shown that after over two decades of management measures, coastal shark populations are finally starting to recover and reclaim their position as top predators, or regulators of their ecosystem. Our research suggests we can begin to shift away from the era of 'doom and gloom' regarding shark status in the United States." Joining Peterson in the study, published in the latest issue of Fish and Fisheries, were VIMS professor Rob Latour, Carolyn Belcher of the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Dana Bethea and William Driggers III of NOAA's Southeast Fisheries Science Center, and Bryan Frazier of the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources. The researchers say their study—based on modeling of combined data from six different scientific surveys conducted along the US East Coast and in the Gulf of Mexico between 1975 and 2014—provides a more accurate and optimistic outlook than previous studies based on commercial fishery landings or surveys in a single location. "Data from shark long-lining operations or shark bycatch can be suspect," says Peterson, "because what looks like a change in abundance might instead be due to changes in fishing gear, target species, market forces, or other factors." Research surveys are scientifically designed to remove these biases. Survey crews purposefully sample a random grid rather than visiting known shark hot spots, and strive to use the exact same gear and methods year after year to ensure consistency in their results. But even with these safeguards, data from a single survey often aren't enough to capture population trends for an entire shark species, whose members may occupy diverse habitats and migrate to different and far-flung areas depending on age and sex. "Because many shark species undergo vast migrations and have complex life cycles," says Peterson, "it's not uncommon for results from different surveys to conflict. Producing an estimate of total abundance requires combining data from different surveys—sometimes from several states or even countries—and applying intricate stock-assessment models." For the current study, the scientists combined data from six different shark surveys: the VIMS Longline Survey, the SouthEast Area Monitoring and Assessment Program's South Atlantic Coastal Trawl Survey, the South Carolina Coastal Longline Survey, the Georgia Red Drum Longline Survey, the Southeast Fisheries Science Center's Longline Survey, and the Gulf of Mexico Shark Pupping and Nursery Area Gillnet Survey. "Our study represents the most comprehensive analysis of patterns in abundance ever conducted for shark species common to our area and the Southeast coast," says Latour, who directs the longline survey at VIMS. Established in 1973, it is the world's longest running fishery independent monitoring program for sharks, skates, and rays. By pooling and modeling data from all six surveys, the researchers were able to estimate population trends for seven of the region's most common coastal species: the large-bodied sandbar, blacktip, spinner, and tiger sharks, and the smaller Atlantic sharpnose, blacknose, and bonnethead sharks. The results of the analysis were clear, says Peterson. "All the large-bodied sharks showed similar population trends, with decreasing abundance from the mid-1970s to the early 1990s, then a multi-year period of low abundance, and recent indications of recovery from past exploitation." All but one population of small coastal sharks also increased in abundance. The exception was blacknose sharks in the Gulf of Mexico, which decreased from the onset of records in 1989 until the study's end in 2014. This species is known to be susceptible to by-catch within the trawl fishery for Gulf shrimp. The blacknose population along the Atlantic coast of the southeast U.S. actually increased during the same period. The overall population trends make biological sense, says Latour. "The large-bodied species saw the greatest initial declines, both because they were highly sought by anglers, and because they mature late and produce relatively few pups. Their slow growth rate also helps explain the pause in their recovery following the onset of fishing regulations in the early 1990s." The smaller shark species, whose higher growth rates make them less susceptible to fishing pressure, saw lesser declines and more rapid recoveries. The team also found a correlation between shark numbers and both fishing pressure and large-scale climatic patterns. Explore further: Researchers recalibrate shark population density using data they gathered during eight years of study on Palmyra atoll More information: Cassidy D Peterson et al, Preliminary recovery of coastal sharks in the south-east United States, Fish and Fisheries (2017). DOI: 10.1111/faf.12210


News Article | December 8, 2015
Site: phys.org

The spacecraft's visual and infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS) instrument made these observations, in which blue represents wavelengths centered at 1.3 microns, green represents 2.0 microns, and red represents 5.0 microns. A view at visible wavelengths (centered around 0.5 microns) would show only Titan's hazy atmosphere. The near-infrared wavelengths in this image allow Cassini's vision to penetrate the haze and reveal the moon's surface. During this Titan flyby, the spacecraft's closest-approach altitude was 6,200 miles (10,000 kilometers), which is considerably higher than those of typical flybys, which are around 750 miles (1,200 kilometers). The high flyby allowed VIMS to gather moderate-resolution views over wide areas (typically at a few kilometers per pixel). The view looks toward terrain that is mostly on the Saturn-facing hemisphere of Titan. The scene features the parallel, dark, dune-filled regions named Fensal (to the north) and Aztlan (to the south), which form the shape of a sideways letter "H." Several places on the image show the surface at higher resolution than elsewhere. These areas, called subframes, show more detail because they were acquired near closest approach. They have finer resolution, but cover smaller areas than data obtained when Cassini was farther away from Titan. Near the limb at left, above center, is the best VIMS view so far of Titan's largest confirmed impact crater, Menrva (first seen by the RADAR instrument in PIA07365). Similarly detailed subframes show eastern Xanadu, the basin Hotei Regio, and channels within bright terrains east of Xanadu. Due to the changing Saturnian seasons, in this late northern spring view, the illumination is significantly changed from that seen by VIMS during the "T-9" flyby on December 26, 2005. The sun has moved higher in the sky in Titan's northern hemisphere, and lower in the sky in the south, as northern summer approaches. This change in the sun's angle with respect to Titan's surface has made high southern latitudes appear darker, while northern latitudes appear brighter. The three mosaics shown here were composed with data from Cassini's visual and infrared mapping spectrometer taken during the last three Titan flybys, on Oct. 28, 2005 (left image), Dec. 26, 2005 (middle image), and Jan. 15, 2006 (right image). These false-color images were constructed from images taken at the following wavelengths: 1.6 microns (blue), 2.01 (green), and 5 microns (red). The viewing geometry of the December flyby is roughly on Titan's opposite hemisphere from the flybys in October and January. There are several important features to note in the images. The first is that the south polar cloud system was very bright during the December flyby, while during the October and January flybys, it is barely visible, indicating that the atmosphere over Titan's south pole is very dynamic. In the December (middle) mosaic, a north polar hood that is bright at 5 microns is visible. Its composition is unknown. The north polar hood is barely seen in the October (left image) and January (right image) data. Visible in the October and January images just south of the equator is Tui Reggio, a region nicknamed the "chevron." This region is very bright at 5 microns and is among the brightest features on Titan at that wavelength. Tui Reggio is thought to be a surface deposit, probably of volcanic origin, and may be water and/or carbon dioxide frozen from the vapor. The January flyby data show that the western margins of Tui Reggio have a complex flow-like character consistent with eruptive phenomena. Credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona


Osseous differentiation within a phyllodes tumor is extremely rare. Cytological and histological findings of a case of malignant phyllodes tumor with osseous differentiation are presented. A 45-year-old female had a malignant phyllodes tumor with osseous stroma diagnosed by fine needle aspiration cytology. The cytological findings were representative of the histological features. The diagnosis of these tumors preoperatively is important in planning the most appropriate treatment. It is also important to follow up these patients postoperatively for long periods for recurrence and metastasis.


Indumati V.,VIMS | Kodliwadmath M.V.,Navodaya Medical College | Sheela M.K.,Navodaya Medical College
Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research | Year: 2011

Background and Objectives: Pregnancy Induced Hypertension (PIH) is one of the most common complications of pregnancy and it contributes significantly to the maternal mortality, premature birth, intra uterine growth retardation (IUGR) and perinatal mortality. The study of electrolytes is gaining ground in the pathophysiology of hypertension. Multiple strategies have been proposed and evaluated for the prevention and management of PIH, which include the moderate dietary restriction of sodium and the administration of magnesium and calcium. Methods: Our study consisted of 50 normal non-pregnant women, 50 normal primigravida in the second or third trimester of pregnancy and 50 pregnant women with PIH. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the serum ionized calcium, magnesium, sodium and potassium levels in PIH and to find out if the deficiency of these electrolytes was a predisposing factor in the genesis of PIH. Results: There was a linear fall in serum ionized calcium, magnesium and sodium levels in the normal pregnancy cases as compared to those in the non-pregnant controls (P< 0.001), with a further significant fall in the PIH cases as compared to the normal pregnancy cases (P< 0.0001). There was no significant change in the potassium levels in the PIH cases as compared to those in the normal pregnancy cases (P<0.457). A decreased calcium intake leads to an increase in the parathyroid hormone, which increases intracellular calcium, thus leading to an increase in the vascular smooth muscle contraction and thus, an elevation in the blood pressure. Low levels of magnesium and sodium cause hypocalcaemia, which in turn increases the blood pressure. Thus, along with a moderate dietary restriction of sodium, a dietary supplementation of calcium and magnesium in the form of milk, cheese, soybean products, leafy vegetables, etc. during pregnancy, could result in a reduction in the incidence of PIH.


News Article | December 11, 2015
Site: www.techtimes.com

NASA has released a composite photo of Saturn's moon Titan, created from images gathered by the Cassini space probe during an approach last month. Using instruments at wavelengths below that of visible light allowed a view of Titan's surface beneath its obscuring, hazy atmosphere, NASA scientists explain. That allowed a view of features on Titan such as dunes and craters, they say. Flying by the moon at a relatively distant 6,200 miles allowed Cassini's visual and infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS) instrument to obtain moderate-resolution views of large areas. Although the released photo shows Titan in an intriguing shade of bluish green, that's false color, NASA researchers point out in a NASA release, representing the wavelengths of light captured by VIMS; blue at 1.3 microns, green at 2.0 microns and red at 5.0 microns. Visible light is in the region of 0.5 microns. The view in the released image is mostly the hemisphere of Titan that faces toward Saturn, NASA says. Titan is half as large in diameter as Earth's moon, and is the solar system's only moon found with a dense atmosphere and evidence of permanent bodies of liquid on its surface. It is the second-largest moon in the solar system after Jupiter's Ganymede. Visible in the image is the best view ever obtained of Menrva, the largest confirmed impact crater on Titan. There are not many such impacts on Titan, suggesting a relatively young surface that has likely been smoothed by winds, flowing liquids and tectonic processes similar to those seen on Earth. However, at Titan's surface temperature of minus 179 degrees Celsius, any water present would be hard as rock, and the liquid falling as rain and collecting in permanent lakes is methane. Also visible in the NASA image are darker, dune-filled regions named Fensal toward the north and Aztlan to the south, parallel to each other in the shape of a sideways letter "H." The Cassini mission, a cooperative effort of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency, is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., which maintains a mission website for the public.

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