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Viswanatha B.,Victoria Hospital and Bangalore Medical College and Research Institute
Ear, nose, & throat journal | Year: 2011

A retrospective study was undertaken to review the clinical presentation, evaluation, management, and outcome of otogenic lateral sinus thrombosis (LST) in children. All pediatric patients with LST seen in our department between 1999 and 2007 were included; there were 9 cases involving 6 boys and 3 girls whose ages ranged from 8 to 12 years. They had all been treated with antibiotics elsewhere prior to admission, and the duration of symptoms before admission ranged from 5 to 18 days. The most common presenting symptoms were ear discharge, headache, otalgia, and fever. Radiologic evaluation included computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. All patients underwent radical mastoidectomy with incision of the lateral sinus and removal of its content. There were no deaths. Pseudomonas and Proteus spp were the most commonly identified organisms. Otogenic LST still poses a serious threat that warrants immediate attention and care. It is often associated with other intracranial complications, such as cerebellar abscess. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging play an important role in the management of this disease. Early and aggressive surgical intervention of this otogenic complication can potentially minimize mortality.


Viswanatha B.,Victoria Hospital and Bangalore Medical College and Research Institute
Ear, Nose and Throat Journal | Year: 2012

A 14-year-old girl who had been experiencing ear discharge for the previous 3 years was referred to a tertiary care center for management of a 3-day history of severe headache and vomiting. Otolaryngologic examination revealed the presence of an atticoantral type of ear disease on the left side. Computed tomography detected an interhemispheric subdural abscess that had originated on the left side. The patient was initially treated with antibiotics, and she later underwent a mastoidectomy to clear the ear disease. She recovered without complications. Subdural empyema is the rarest complication of otitis media, and it is very rarely seen in an interhemispheric setting. © 2012 Vendome Group, LLC.


Viswanatha B.,Victoria Hospital and Bangalore Medical College and Research Institute
Ear, Nose and Throat Journal | Year: 2011

A 10-year-old boy presented with a complaint of a left-sided nasal obstruction with an associated foul-smelling discharge. Physical examination and anterior rhinoscopy revealed that a whitish, friable mass had completely filled the left nasal cavity. On computed tomography, a soft-tissue mass was seen filling the cavity and extending to the paranasal sinuses with bone erosion. A biopsy of the mass suggested that it represented a cholesteatoma. The lesion was removed via nasal endoscopy, and histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of a cholesteatoma. No recurrence was noted during 6 months of follow-up. Cholesteatoma of the paranasal sinuses is a rare entity, as only a few dozen cases have been reported in the literature. © 2011, Vendome Group, LLC.


Viswanatha B.,Victoria Hospital and Bangalore Medical College and Research Institute
Ear, nose, & throat journal | Year: 2011

The author conducted a retrospective review of the clinical presentation, management, and complications of temporal bone osteoma in young adolescents. The study population was made up of 9 patients-5 girls and 4 boys, aged 12 to 15 years at presentation (mean: 13.7)-who had been seen for radiologically and histopathologically proven temporal bone osteoma at the author's institution over a 9-year period. Of this group, 5 patients had extracanalicular osteoma (3 in the mastoid portion of the temporal bone, 1 in the squamous portion, and 1 in the mastoid antrum) and 4 patients had osteoma of the external auditory canal. Six of the 9 patients underwent surgical treatment; of the remainder, 1 refused surgery and 2 were managed conservatively with ongoing observation. All patients were followed for a minimum of 1 year, and no recurrences and no complications were observed during that time.


Viswanatha B.,Victoria Hospital and Bangalore Medical College and Research Institute
Ear, Nose and Throat Journal | Year: 2011

The author conducted a retrospective review of the clinical presentation, management, and complications of temporal bone osteoma in young adolescents. The study population was made up of 9 patients-5 girls and 4 boys, aged 12 to 15 years at presentation (mean: 13.7)-who had been seen for radiologically and histopathologically proven temporal bone osteoma at the author's institution over a 9-year period. Of this group, 5 patients had extracanalicular osteoma (3 in the mastoid portion of the temporal bone, 1 in the squamous portion, and 1 in the mastoid antrum) and 4 patients had osteoma of the external auditory canal. Six of the 9 patients underwent surgical treatment; of the remainder, 1 refused surgery and 2 were managed conservatively with ongoing observation. All patients were followed for a minimum of 1 year, and no recurrences and no complications were observed during that time. © 2012 Vendome Group, LLC.


PubMed | Victoria Hospital and Bangalore Medical College and Research Institute
Type: Case Reports | Journal: Ear, nose, & throat journal | Year: 2011

A 10-year-old boy presented with a complaint of a left-sided nasal obstruction with an associated foul-smelling discharge. Physical examination and anterior rhinoscopy revealed that a whitish, friable mass had completely filled the left nasal cavity. On computed tomography, a soft-tissue mass was seen filling the cavity and extending to the paranasal sinuses with bone erosion. A biopsy of the mass suggested that it represented a cholesteatoma. The lesion was removed via nasal endoscopy, and histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of a cholesteatoma. No recurrence was noted during 6 months of follow-up. Cholesteatoma of the paranasal sinuses is a rare entity, as only a few dozen cases have been reported in the literature.


PubMed | Victoria Hospital and Bangalore Medical College and Research Institute
Type: Case Reports | Journal: Ear, nose, & throat journal | Year: 2010

Otitic hydrocephalus is a rare intracranial complication of otitis media. It is characterized by elevated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure with normal CSF biochemistry and without any focal neurologic abnormality other than those related to the increased intracranial pressure. The pathophysiology of this rare condition is unknown. The incidence of intracranial complications was reduced dramatically with the introduction of newer antibiotics, but complicated cases still occur. Serious consequences can ensue if complications are not identified and treated properly. The author reviews the literature on otitic hydrocephalus and describes 2 new cases.


PubMed | Victoria Hospital and Bangalore Medical College and Research Institute
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Ear, nose, & throat journal | Year: 2011

The author conducted a retrospective review of the clinical presentation, management, and complications of temporal bone osteoma in young adolescents. The study population was made up of 9 patients-5 girls and 4 boys, aged 12 to 15 years at presentation (mean: 13.7)-who had been seen for radiologically and histopathologically proven temporal bone osteoma at the authors institution over a 9-year period. Of this group, 5 patients had extracanalicular osteoma (3 in the mastoid portion of the temporal bone, 1 in the squamous portion, and 1 in the mastoid antrum) and 4 patients had osteoma of the external auditory canal. Six of the 9 patients underwent surgical treatment; of the remainder, 1 refused surgery and 2 were managed conservatively with ongoing observation. All patients were followed for a minimum of 1 year, and no recurrences and no complications were observed during that time.


PubMed | Victoria Hospital and Bangalore Medical College and Research Institute
Type: Case Reports | Journal: Ear, nose, & throat journal | Year: 2010

Kimura disease is an uncommon chronic, benign, inflammatory condition of unknown etiology. It occurs endemically in Asia and sporadically in the West. Because it often imitates neoplastic or inflammatory processes of the head and neck, otolaryngologists and head and neck surgeons should be aware of its clinical presentations. In this article, the author reports 2 cases of Kimura disease-1 that was characterized by an unusual bilateral presentation and 1 that was managed conservatively-and he briefly reviews the literature on this entity.


PubMed | Victoria Hospital and Bangalore Medical College and Research Institute
Type: Case Reports | Journal: Ear, nose, & throat journal | Year: 2012

A 14-year-old girl who had been experiencing ear discharge for the previous 3 years was referred to a tertiary care center for management of a 3-day history of severe headache and vomiting. Otolaryngologic examination revealed the presence of an atticoantral type of ear disease on the left side. Computed tomography detected an interhemispheric subdural abscess that had originated on the left side. The patient was initially treated with antibiotics, and she later underwent a mastoidectomy to clear the ear disease. She recovered without complications. Subdural empyema is the rarest complication of otitis media, and it is very rarely seen in an interhemispheric setting.

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