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Darlinghurst, Australia

The Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute is an independent, not-for-profit research facility, based in Darlinghurst, New South Wales, Australia. The Institute was founded in memory of pioneering cardiac surgeon Dr. Victor Chang and his passionate belief in the power of discovery.Established on 15 February 1994, approximately three years after Dr. Chang's death, and opened by then Prime Minister Paul Keating, the Institute has become a world-class research and research training facility. Wikipedia.


Cropley J.E.,Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute
Proceedings. Biological sciences / The Royal Society | Year: 2012

Natural selection acts on variation that is typically assumed to be genetic in origin. But epigenetic mechanisms, which are interposed between the genome and its environment, can create diversity independently of genetic variation. Epigenetic states can respond to environmental cues, and can be heritable, thus providing a means by which environmentally responsive phenotypes might be selectable independent of genotype. Here, we have tested the possibility that environment and selection can act together to increase the penetrance of an epigenetically determined phenotype. We used isogenic A(vy) mice, in which the epigenetic state of the A(vy) allele is sensitive to dietary methyl donors. By combining methyl donor supplementation with selection for a silent A(vy) allele, we progressively increased the prevalence of the associated phenotype in the population over five generations. After withdrawal of the dietary supplement, the shift persisted for one generation but was lost in subsequent generations. Our data provide the first demonstration that selection for a purely epigenetic trait can result in cumulative germline effects in mammals. These results present an alternative to the paradigm that natural selection acts only on genetic variation, and suggest that epigenetic changes could underlie rapid adaptation of species in response to natural environmental fluctuations. Source


Vandenberg J.I.,Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute
Physiological reviews | Year: 2012

The human ether-a-go-go related gene (hERG) encodes the pore-forming subunit of the rapid component of the delayed rectifier K(+) channel, Kv11.1, which are expressed in the heart, various brain regions, smooth muscle cells, endocrine cells, and a wide range of tumor cell lines. However, it is the role that Kv11.1 channels play in the heart that has been best characterized, for two main reasons. First, it is the gene product involved in chromosome 7-associated long QT syndrome (LQTS), an inherited disorder associated with a markedly increased risk of ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Second, blockade of Kv11.1, by a wide range of prescription medications, causes drug-induced QT prolongation with an increase in risk of sudden cardiac arrest. In the first part of this review, the properties of Kv11.1 channels, including biogenesis, trafficking, gating, and pharmacology are discussed, while the second part focuses on the pathophysiology of Kv11.1 channels. Source


Hentze M.W.,European Molecular Biology Laboratory | Preiss T.,Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute | Preiss T.,University of New South Wales
Trends in Biochemical Sciences | Year: 2010

'Classic' enzymes carry out the housekeeping functions of intermediary metabolism. The past decades have seen a steady trickle of reports of several of these enzymes 'moonlighting' as RNA-binding proteins. Although evidence for a physiological role for RNA binding is strong in a few individual examples, no systematic concept has been proposed for the overall phenomenon. We suggest that these diverse observations might herald the existence of currently hidden post-transcriptional regulatory networks between intermediary metabolism and gene expression based on RNA, enzyme and metabolite interactions. We briefly summarize the evidence in support of such networks and discuss how current approaches can be employed for systematic analyses and integration into our understanding of cellular biology, given the technical and conceptual advances of the 'omics' age. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Grant
Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-IP | Phase: HEALTH-2011.2.2.1-2 | Award Amount: 17.04M | Year: 2012

NEURINOX aims at elucidating the role of NADPH oxidases (NOX) in neuroinflammation and its progression to neurodegenerative diseases (ND), as well as evaluating the potential of novel ND therapeutics approaches targeting NOX activity. NOX generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) and have emerged as regulators of neuroinflammation. Their role is complex: ROS generated by NOX lead to tissue damage in microglia-mediated neuroinflammation, as seen in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), while absence of ROS generation enhances the severity of autoimmune-mediated neuroinflammation, as seen for e.g. in multiple sclerosis (MS). The objective of the 5 years NEURINOX project is to understand how NOX controls neuroinflammation, identify novel molecular pathways and oxidative biomarkers involved in NOX-dependent neuroinflammation, and develop specific therapies based on NOX modulation. The scientific approach will be to: (i) identify NOX-dependent molecular mechanisms using dedicated ND animal models (ii) develop therapeutic small molecules either inhibiting or activating NOX and test their effects in animal models (iii) test the validity of identified molecular pathways in clinical studies in ALS and MS patients. NEURINOX will contribute to better understand brain dysfunction, and more particularly the link between neuroinflammation and ND and to identify new therapeutic targets for ND. A successful demonstration of the benefits of NOX modulating drugs in ALS and MS animal models, and in ALS early clinical trials will validate a novel high potential therapeutics target for ALS and also many types of ND. NEURINOX has hence a strong potential for more efficient ND healthcare for patients and thus for reducing ND healthcare costs. This multi-disciplinary consortium includes leading scientists in NOX research, ROS biology, drug development SMEs, experts in the neuroinflammatory aspects of ND, genomics and proteomics, and clinicians able to translate the basic science to the patient.


Del Monte G.,Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute | Harvey R.P.,Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute | Harvey R.P.,University of New South Wales
Cell | Year: 2012

Despite the profound impact of coronary artery disease on human health, the origins of the coronary blood vessels are poorly understood. Wu et al. use imaging and genetic techniques to show that the endocardium contributes to the coronary vessels and that the coronary arteries and veins have multilineage origins. © 2012 Elsevier Inc. Source

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