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PubMed | The Adelaide and Meath Hospital incorporating the National Childrens Hospital, Materials Misericordiae University Hospital, Steno Diabetes Center, University College Dublin and 2 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2015

Type 2 diabetes has a long pre clinical asymptomatic phase. Early detection may delay or arrest disease progression. The Diabetes Mellitus and Vascular health initiative (DMVhi) was initiated as a prospective longitudinal cohort study on the prevalence of undiagnosed Type 2 diabetes and prediabetes, diabetes risk and cardiovascular risk in a cohort of Irish adults aged 45-75 years.Members of the largest Irish private health insurance provider aged 45 to 75 years were invited to participate in the study.already diagnosed with diabetes or taking oral hypoglycaemic agents. Participants completed a detailed medical questionnaire, had weight, height, waist and hip circumference and blood pressure measured. Fasting blood samples were taken for fasting plasma glucose (FPG). Those with FPG in the impaired fasting glucose (IFG) range had a 75gm oral glucose tolerance test performed.122,531 subjects were invited to participate. 29,144 (24%) completed the study. The prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes was 1.8%, of impaired fasting glucose (IFG) was 7.1% and of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) was 2.9%. Dysglycaemia increased among those aged 45-54, 55-64 and 65-75 years in both males (10.6%, 18.5%, 21.7% respectively) and females (4.3%, 8.6%, 10.9% respectively). Undiagnosed T2D, IFG and IGT were all associated with gender, age, blood pressure, BMI, abdominal obesity, family history of diabetes and triglyceride levels. Using FPG as initial screening may underestimate the prevalence of T2D in the study population.This study is the largest screening study for diabetes and prediabetes in the Irish population. Follow up of this cohort will provide data on progression to diabetes and on cardiovascular outcomes.


O'Donoghue G.M.,Dublin City University | Kennedy A.,Dublin City University | Stig Andersen G.,Steno Diabetes Center | Durkan E.,Dublin City University | And 4 more authors.
Trials | Year: 2015

Background: With the global escalation of type 2 diabetes and evidence consistently showing that its onset can be prevented or delayed by changing lifestyle behaviours, there is an urgent need to translate practical, affordable and acceptable interventions from the research setting into the real world. One such approach to lifestyle interventions might be the introduction of a programme in which the individual is provided with choice and facilitated to 'self-select' an exercise programme. Previous research has shown that this is likely to be less resource intensive, an essential requirement for success outside the controlled research environment, while at the same time promoting positive responses relating to adherence, competence and self-efficacy, essential attributes for long-term success. Through a two-group parallel-randomised controlled trial, this study aims to assess the clinical and psychological impact of the DEXLIFE 'self-selected' lifestyle modification programme in adults at risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Methods/design: A total of 360 subjects at risk of developing type 2 diabetes are randomly assigned in a 1:3 ratio to a control (n = 90) or intervention arm (n = 270). Randomization is stratified by age, sex and body mass index. The control arm receives general information on lifestyle and diabetes risk. The intervention group participate in a 12 week 'self-selected' supervised exercise training programme accompanied with dietary advice to improve food choices. Participants are given access to Dublin City University Sport (an on-campus gym) and asked to perform four exercise classes per week. Dublin City University Sport offers over 50 classes per week, many of which are medically supervised. If weight loss is indicated, reduction in total calorie intake by 600 kcal/day is advised. Common to all food plans is <10 % saturated fat intake, as well as a dietary fibre intake of >15 g/1000 kcal. Discussion: "Self-selected" lifestyle intervention has not previously been evaluated in type 2 diabetes prevention and if shown to be successful could be implemented in practice immediately. Trial registration: Current Controlled Trials: ISRCTN66987085. © 2015 O'Donoghue et al.


Sinnott M.,Vhi Healthcare Ltd | Kinsley B.T.,Materials Misericordiae University Hospital | Jackson A.D.,Vhi Healthcare Ltd | Walsh C.,Trinity College Dublin | And 7 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2015

bjective Type 2 diabetes has a long pre clinical asymptomatic phase. Early detection may delay or arrest disease progression. The Diabetes Mellitus and Vascular health initiative (DMVhi) was initiated as a prospective longitudinal cohort study on the prevalence of undiagnosed Type 2 diabetes and prediabetes, diabetes risk and cardiovascular risk in a cohort of Irish adults aged 45-75 years. Research Design and Methods Members of the largest Irish private health insurance provider aged 45 to 75 years were invited to participate in the study. Exclusion criteria: Already diagnosed with diabetes or taking oral hypoglycaemic agents. Participants completed a detailed medical questionnaire, had weight, height, waist and hip circumference and blood pressure measured. Fasting blood samples were taken for fasting plasma glucose (FPG). Those with FPG in the impaired fasting glucose (IFG) range had a 75gm oral glucose tolerance test performed. Results 122,531 subjects were invited to participate. 29,144 (24%) completed the study. The prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes was 1.8%, of impaired fasting glucose (IFG) was 7.1% and of impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) was 2.9%. Dysglycaemia increased among those aged 45-54, 55-64 and 65-75 years in both males (10.6%, 18.5%, 21.7% respectively) and females (4.3%, 8.6%, 10.9%respectively). Undiagnosed T2D, IFG and IGT were all associated with gender, age, blood pressure, BMI, abdominal obesity, family history of diabetes and triglyceride levels. Using FPG as initial screening may underestimate the prevalence of T2D in the study population. Conclusions This study is the largest screening study for diabetes and prediabetes in the Irish population. Follow up of this cohort will provide data on progression to diabetes and on cardiovascular outcomes. © 2015 Sinnott et al.


O'Donoghue G.M.,Dublin City University | O'Donoghue G.M.,Steno Diabetes Center | Kennedy A.,Dublin City University | Stig Andersen G.,Steno Diabetes Center | And 5 more authors.
Trials | Year: 2015

Background: With the global escalation of type 2 diabetes and evidence consistently showing that its onset can be prevented or delayed by changing lifestyle behaviours, there is an urgent need to translate practical, affordable and acceptable interventions from the research setting into the real world. One such approach to lifestyle interventions might be the introduction of a programme in which the individual is provided with choice and facilitated to 'self-select' an exercise programme. Previous research has shown that this is likely to be less resource intensive, an essential requirement for success outside the controlled research environment, while at the same time promoting positive responses relating to adherence, competence and self-efficacy, essential attributes for long-term success. Through a two-group parallel-randomised controlled trial, this study aims to assess the clinical and psychological impact of the DEXLIFE 'self-selected' lifestyle modification programme in adults at risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Methods/design: A total of 360 subjects at risk of developing type 2 diabetes are randomly assigned in a 1:3 ratio to a control (n=90) or intervention arm (n=270). Randomization is stratified by age, sex and body mass index. The control arm receives general information on lifestyle and diabetes risk. The intervention group participate in a 12week 'self-selected' supervised exercise training programme accompanied with dietary advice to improve food choices. Participants are given access to Dublin City University Sport (an on-campus gym) and asked to perform four exercise classes per week. Dublin City University Sport offers over 50 classes per week, many of which are medically supervised. If weight loss is indicated, reduction in total calorie intake by 600kcal/day is advised. Common to all food plans is <10% saturated fat intake, as well as a dietary fibre intake of >15g/1000kcal. Insulin sensitivity is the primary outcome measure. Secondary outcome measures include glucose function, fitness, body composition, anthropometrics, heart rate variability, lipid profiles, blood pressure, physical activity levels, dietary intake and quality of life. Discussion: "Self-selected" lifestyle intervention has not previously been evaluated in type 2 diabetes prevention and if shown to be successful could be implemented in practice immediately. Trial registration: Current Controlled Trials: ISRCTN66987085. © 2015 O'Donoghue et al.


With the global escalation of type 2 diabetes and evidence consistently showing that its onset can be prevented or delayed by changing lifestyle behaviours, there is an urgent need to translate practical, affordable and acceptable interventions from the research setting into the real world. One such approach to lifestyle interventions might be the introduction of a programme in which the individual is provided with choice and facilitated to self-select an exercise programme. Previous research has shown that this is likely to be less resource intensive, an essential requirement for success outside the controlled research environment, while at the same time promoting positive responses relating to adherence, competence and self-efficacy, essential attributes for long-term success. Through a two-group parallel-randomised controlled trial, this study aims to assess the clinical and psychological impact of the DEXLIFE self-selected lifestyle modification programme in adults at risk of developing type 2 diabetes.A total of 360 subjects at risk of developing type 2 diabetes are randomly assigned in a 1:3 ratio to a control (n=90) or intervention arm (n=270). Randomization is stratified by age, sex and body mass index. The control arm receives general information on lifestyle and diabetes risk. The intervention group participate in a 12 week self-selected supervised exercise training programme accompanied with dietary advice to improve food choices. Participants are given access to Dublin City University Sport (an on-campus gym) and asked to perform four exercise classes per week. Dublin City University Sport offers over 50 classes per week, many of which are medically supervised. If weight loss is indicated, reduction in total calorie intake by 600 kcal/day is advised. Common to all food plans is <10% saturated fat intake, as well as a dietary fibre intake of >15 g/1000 kcal. Insulin sensitivity is the primary outcome measure. Secondary outcome measures include glucose function, fitness, body composition, anthropometrics, heart rate variability, lipid profiles, blood pressure, physical activity levels, dietary intake and quality of life.Self-selected lifestyle intervention has not previously been evaluated in type 2 diabetes prevention and if shown to be successful could be implemented in practice immediately.Current Controlled Trials: ISRCTN66987085.

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