National Veterinary Research Center

Muguga, Kenya

National Veterinary Research Center

Muguga, Kenya

Time filter

Source Type

Mulongo M.,Kenya International Livestock Research Institute | Mulongo M.,Royal Veterinary College | Mulongo M.,Kenya Medical Research Institute | Frey J.,University of Bern | And 5 more authors.
Infection and Immunity | Year: 2015

Contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) is a serious respiratory disease of cattle caused by Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides. Current vaccines against CBPP induce short-lived immunity and can cause severe postvaccine reactions. Previous studies have identified the N terminus of the transmembrane lipoprotein Q (LppQ-N') of M. mycoides subsp. mycoides as the major antigen and a possible virulence factor. We therefore immunized cattle with purified recombinant LppQ-N' formulated in Freund's adjuvant and challenged them with M. mycoides subsp. mycoides. Vaccinated animals showed a strong seroconversion to LppQ, but they exhibited significantly enhanced postchallenge glomerulonephritis compared to the placebo group (P = 0.021). Glomerulonephritis was characterized by features that suggested the development of antigen-antibody immune complexes. Clinical signs and gross pathological scores did not significantly differ between vaccinated and placebo groups. These findings reveal for the first time the pathogenesis of enhanced disease as a result of antibodies against LppQ during challenge and also argue against inclusion of LppQ-N' in a future subunit vaccine for CBPP. © 2015 Mulongo et al.


Mulongo M.M.,Kenya International Livestock Research Institute | Mulongo M.M.,Royal Veterinary College University of London | Frey J.,University of Bern | Smith K.,Royal Veterinary College University of London | And 4 more authors.
Vaccine | Year: 2013

The membrane-associated enzyme l-α-glycerol-3-phosphate oxidase (GlpO) of Mycoplasma mycoides subs. mycoides (Mmm), the causal agent of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) has been identified as a virulence factor responsible for the release of toxic by-products such as H2O2 that mediate host cell injury. Since CBPP pathogenesis is based on host inflammatory reactions, we have determined the capacity of recombinant GlpO to generate in vivo protective responses against challenge in immunized cattle. We also investigated whether sera raised against recombinant GlpO in cattle and mice inhibit production of H2O2 by Mmm. Immunization of cattle with recombinant GlpO did not protect against challenge with a virulent strain of Mmm. Further, although both murine and bovine antisera raised against recombinant GlpO detected recombinant and native forms of GlpO in immunoblot assays with similar titres, only murine antibodies could neutralize GlpO enzymatic function. The data raise the possibility that Mmm has adapted to evade potential detrimental antibody responses in its definitive host. © 2013 The Authors.


PubMed | Moredun Research Institute, Royal Veterinary College, University of Bern, National Veterinary Research Center and Kenya International Livestock Research Institute
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Infection and immunity | Year: 2015

Contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) is a serious respiratory disease of cattle caused by Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides. Current vaccines against CBPP induce short-lived immunity and can cause severe postvaccine reactions. Previous studies have identified the N terminus of the transmembrane lipoprotein Q (LppQ-N) of M. mycoides subsp. mycoides as the major antigen and a possible virulence factor. We therefore immunized cattle with purified recombinant LppQ-N formulated in Freunds adjuvant and challenged them with M. mycoides subsp. mycoides. Vaccinated animals showed a strong seroconversion to LppQ, but they exhibited significantly enhanced postchallenge glomerulonephritis compared to the placebo group (P = 0.021). Glomerulonephritis was characterized by features that suggested the development of antigen-antibody immune complexes. Clinical signs and gross pathological scores did not significantly differ between vaccinated and placebo groups. These findings reveal for the first time the pathogenesis of enhanced disease as a result of antibodies against LppQ during challenge and also argue against inclusion of LppQ-N in a future subunit vaccine for CBPP.

Loading National Veterinary Research Center collaborators
Loading National Veterinary Research Center collaborators