Veterinary Research and Consulting Services LLC

Greeley, CO, United States

Veterinary Research and Consulting Services LLC

Greeley, CO, United States
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Canning P.,ELANCO Animal Health | Hassfurther R.,ELANCO Animal Health | TerHune T.,HMS Veterinary Development Inc. | Rogers K.,Veterinary Research and Consulting Services LLC | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Dairy Science | Year: 2017

Periparturient dairy cows experience impaired immune function, exhibited as a transient decrease in neutrophil function and neutropenia. This decrease in immune competence is associated with an increase in susceptibility to bacterial infections, including mastitis and metritis. Bovine granulocyte colony stimulating factor (bG-CSF) is an endogenous protein that enhances neutrophil bactericidal functions and increases the production of neutrophils from bone marrow precursors. Administration of pegbovigrastim (recombinant bG-CSF covalently bound to polyethylene glycol) around the time of calving has been shown to reduce the incidence of new clinical mastitis cases in a natural disease model system. To further explore the application of pegbovigrastim under herd management systems typical of those found in the US dairy industry, we conducted a multicenter field study to evaluate the efficacy and clinical safety of pegbovigrastim administered to multiparous cows and heifers approximately 7 d before calving and within 24 h of calving. Responses of treated cows were compared with those of animals treated with sterile saline. Animals treated with pegbovigrastim exhibited 4- to 5-fold increases in circulating neutrophil numbers within 24 h of treatment initiation, and this increase persisted at least a week beyond the second dose. Pegbovigrastim-treated animals exhibited a 35% decrease in the incidence of clinical mastitis relative to the controls during the first 30 d of lactation. Animals treated with pegbovigrastim also exhibited a 52% reduction in failure to return to visual estrus within 80 d of calving. We observed no differences in somatic cell count or milk composition between treated and control animals. We also found no differences in the duration of pregnancy or proportion of viable calves in treated cows relative to control animals. These results indicate that administration of pegbovigrastim provides a well-tolerated, novel approach to overcoming periparturient immune suppression, resulting in reduced susceptibility to clinical mastitis during early lactation. © 2017 American Dairy Science Association.


Miles D.G.,Veterinary Research and Consulting Services LLC | Rogers K.C.,Veterinary Research and Consulting Services LLC
Animal Health Research Reviews | Year: 2014

Pasteur described an organism causing fowl cholera in 1880. In 134 years we have progressed from crude vaccines for Pasteurella, to some refined vaccines, to a name change (Mannheimia), to autogenous vaccines (back to crude). In the last 25-30 years, we have attempted to mitigate the problem of bovine respiratory disease with antimicrobials and subsequently have a high incidence of multi-drug resistance. All of these attempts have resulted in little if any improvement in morbidity/mortality. Is it time to focus on the animal's response or lack of response to infectious pressure? Instead of focusing on the 10-50% morbid cattle should we focus on the 50-90% that are not compromised and determine why they stay healthy under the same environmental conditions? Copyright © 2014 Cambridge University Press.


PubMed | Veterinary Research and Consulting Services LLC
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Animal health research reviews | Year: 2014

Pasteur described an organism causing fowl cholera in 1880. In 134 years we have progressed from crude vaccines for Pasteurella, to some refined vaccines, to a name change (Mannheimia), to autogenous vaccines (back to crude). In the last 25-30 years, we have attempted to mitigate the problem of bovine respiratory disease with antimicrobials and subsequently have a high incidence of multi-drug resistance. All of these attempts have resulted in little if any improvement in morbidity/mortality. Is it time to focus on the animals response or lack of response to infectious pressure? Instead of focusing on the 10-50% morbid cattle should we focus on the 50-90% that are not compromised and determine why they stay healthy under the same environmental conditions?

Loading Veterinary Research and Consulting Services LLC collaborators
Loading Veterinary Research and Consulting Services LLC collaborators