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Kalamazoo, MI, United States

Rhodes D.V.L.,Virginia Commonwealth University | Earnhart C.G.,Virginia Commonwealth University | Mather T.N.,University of Rhode Island | Meeus P.F.M.,Veterinary Medicine Research and Development | Marconi R.T.,Virginia Commonwealth University
Veterinary Journal | Year: 2013

In endemic regions, Lyme disease is a potential health threat to dogs. Canine Lyme disease manifests with arthritis-induced lameness, anorexia, fever, lethargy, lymphadenopathy and, in some cases, fatal glomerulonephritis. A recent study revealed that the regional mean for the percentage of seropositive dogs in the north-east of the USA is 11.6%. The outer surface protein C (OspC) of Lyme disease spirochetes is an important virulence factor required for the establishment of infection in mammals. It is a leading candidate in human and canine Lyme disease vaccine development efforts. Over 30 distinct ospC phyletic types have been defined. It has been hypothesized that ospC genotype may influence mammalian host range. In this study, Ixodes scapularis ticks collected from the field in Rhode Island were assessed for infection with B. burgdorferi. Ticks were fed on purpose bred beagles to repletion and infection of the dogs was assessed through serology and PCR. Tissue biopsies (n= 2) were collected from each dog 49. days post-tick infestation (dpi) and the ospC genotype of the infecting strains determined by direct PCR of DNA extracted from tissue or by PCR after cultivation of spirochetes from biopsy samples. The dominant ospC types associated with B. burgdorferi canine infections differed from those associated with human infection, indicating a relationship between ospC sequence and preferred host range. Knowledge of the most common ospC genotypes associated specifically with infection of dogs will facilitate the rational design of OspC-based canine Lyme disease vaccines and diagnostic assays. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Bailey M.,Veterinary Medicine Research and Development | Shield-Artin K.,Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute | Oliva K.,University of Queensland | Ayhan M.,University of Queensland | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Carcinogenesis | Year: 2013

Introduction: Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death from gynecological cancer. Non-specific symptoms early in disease and the lack of specific biomarkers hinder early diagnosis. Multi-marker blood screening tests have shown promise for improving identification of early stage disease; however, available tests lack sensitivity, and specificity. Materials and Methods: In this study, pooled deeply-depleted plasma from women with Stage 1, 2 or 3 ovarian cancer and healthy controls were used to compare the 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) protein profiles and identify potential novel markers of ovarian cancer progression. Results/Discussion: Stage-specific variation in biomarker expression was observed. For example, apolipoprotein A1 expression is relatively low in control and Stage 1, but shows a substantial increase in Stage 2 and 3, thus, potential of utility for disease confirmation rather than early detection. A better marker for early stage disease was tropomyosin 4 (TPM4). The expression of TPM4 increased by 2-fold in Stage 2 before returning to normal levels in Stage 3 disease. Multiple isoforms were also identified for some proteins and in some cases, displayed stage-specific expression. An interesting example was fibrinogen alpha, for which 8 isoforms were identified. Four displayed a moderate increase at Stage 1 and a substantial increase for Stages 2 and 3 while the other 4 showed only moderate increases. Conclusion: Herein is provided an improved summary of blood protein profiles for women with ovarian cancer stratified by stage. © 2012 Warren. Source


Six R.H.,Veterinary Medicine Research and Development | Liebenberg J.,ClinVet International Pty Ltd. | Honsberger N.A.,Veterinary Medicine Research and Development | Mahabir S.P.,Veterinary Medicine Research and Development
Parasites and Vectors | Year: 2016

Background: Fleas are the most common ectoparasite infesting dogs globally. The many possible sequellae of infestation include: direct discomfort; allergic reactions; and the transmission of pathogens. Rapid speed of kill is an important characteristic for a parasiticide in order to alleviate the direct deleterious effects of fleas, reduce the impact of allergic responses, and break the flea infestation cycle. In this study, the speed of kill of a novel orally administered isoxazoline parasiticide, sarolaner (Simparica™) against fleas on dogs was evaluated and compared with afoxolaner (NexGard®) for 5 weeks after a single oral dose. Methods: Twenty-four dogs were randomly allocated to treatment with a single oral dose at label rate of either sarolaner (2 to 4 mg/kg) or afoxolaner (2.5 to 6.8 mg/kg) or placebo, based on pretreatment flea counts. Dogs were combed and live fleas counted at 8, 12 and 24 h after treatment and subsequent re-infestations on Days 7, 14, 21, 28 and 35. Efficacy was determined at each time point relative to counts for placebo dogs. Results: There were no adverse reactions to treatment. A single oral dose of sarolaner provided ≥98.8 % efficacy (based on geometric means) within 8 h of treatment or subsequent weekly re-infestations of fleas to Day 35. By 12 h, fleas were virtually eradicated from all dogs, with only two fleas recovered from a single sarolaner-treated dog on Day 7; efficacy was 100 % at all other time points. Significantly greater numbers of live fleas were recovered from afoxolaner-treated dogs at 8 h on all days and at 12 h on Days 28 and 35 (P < 0.05). Conclusions: In this controlled laboratory evaluation, sarolaner had a significantly faster speed of kill against fleas than afoxolaner. This was noticeably more evident towards the end of the treatment period. The rapid and consistent kill of fleas within 8 to 12 h after a single oral dose of sarolaner over 35 days indicates that this treatment will provide highly effective control of flea infestations, relief for dogs afflicted with flea allergy dermatitis, and should reduce the risk of flea-borne pathogen transmission. © 2016 Six et al. Source


Becskei C.,Veterinary Medicine Research and Development | Geurden T.,Veterinary Medicine Research and Development | Erasmus H.,ClinVet International Pty Ltd. | Cuppens O.,Veterinary Medicine Research and Development | And 2 more authors.
Parasites and Vectors | Year: 2016

Background: Ticks are common ectoparasites that infest dogs globally. Acaricides with rapid and sustained speed of kill are critical to control infestations and to reduce the risk of disease transmission. This study evaluated the speed of kill for 5 weeks after a single dose of orally administered Simparica™(sarolaner) against induced infestations with Dermacentor reticulatus on dogs, compared to Advantix®Spot-on solution for dogs (imidacloprid + permethrin). Methods: Twenty four dogs were randomly allocated to treatment with either a placebo tablet, a sarolaner tablet (at 2 to 4 mg/kg) or with Advantix® as per label instructions. Dogs were treated on Day 0 and tick counts were performed in situ at 8 and 12 hours and with removal of the ticks at 24 hours after treatment and subsequent re-infestations on Days 7, 14, 21, 28 and 35. Acaricidal efficacy was determined at each time point relative to live tick counts from the placebo-treated dogs. Results: Based on arithmetic (geometric) mean tick counts, the efficacy of sarolaner was ≥75.6 % (89.6 %) within 8 hours of treatment and tick counts were significantly lower than placebo and imidacloprid + permethrin-treated dogs (P < 0.0001), while imidacloprid + permethrin had no significant reduction (P ≥ 0.3990) at 8 or 12 hours after treatment. Sarolaner killed all ticks on the dogs within 24 hours after treatment, while imidacloprid + permethrin efficacy was only 48.1 %. After weekly re-infestations sarolaner significantly reduced the tick counts versus placebo within 8 hours on Days 7, 14 and 35 (P ≤ 0.0239), and at 12 hours and 24 hours (P ≤ 0.0079) until Day 35.Sarolaner efficacy was ≥95.8 % within 24 hours for 35 days. Significantly more live ticks (P ≤ 0.0451) were recovered from imidacloprid + permethrin-treated dogs than from sarolaner-treated dogs at 24 hours after infestation on all days. There were no sarolaner-related adverse reactions during the study. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that Simparica™ had a faster and more consistent speed of kill against D. reticulatus compared to Advantix®. The rapid and consistent efficacy within 24 hours for 5 weeks after a single oral dose of Simparica™ provides effective and reliable control of D. reticulatus and reduces the risk of transmission of tick-borne diseases. © 2016 Becskei et al. Source


Six R.H.,Veterinary Medicine Research and Development | Young D.R.,YVRS | Myers M.R.,Veterinary Medicine Research and Development | Mahabir S.P.,Veterinary Medicine Research and Development
Parasites and Vectors | Year: 2016

Background: The lone star tick, Amblyomma americanum, infests dogs and cats in North America and transmits the pathogens Ehrlichia chaffeensis and Ehrlichia ewingii, which cause monocytic and granulocytic ehrlichiosis in dogs and humans, and Cytauxzoon felis which causes cytauxzoonosis in cats. A parasiticide's speed of kill is important to minimize the direct deleterious effects [related to blood-feeding] of tick infestation and reduce the risk of transmission of tick-borne pathogens. In this study the speed of kill of sarolaner (Simparica™ Chewables) administered monthly for 3 months against A. americanum on dogs was evaluated and compared with a single dose of fluralaner (Bravecto®) for 13 weeks. Methods: Based on pretreatment tick counts, 24 dogs were randomly allocated to treatment with placebo or sarolaner at the label rate (2 to 4 mg/kg) on Days 0, 30 and 60 or with fluralaner (25 to 56 mg/kg) once according to manufacturer's instructions on Day 0. Dogs were examined and live ticks counted at 8, 12, and 24 h after treatment and subsequent re-infestations on Days 14, 28, 42, 58, 76 and 90. Acaricidal efficacy was determined at each time point relative to counts for placebo dogs. Results: Monthly oral doses of sarolaner provided > 95 % efficacy within 24 h of treatment, and consistently provided > 70 % efficacy against subsequent re-infestations with ticks within 24 h over the entire treatment period. Significantly more live ticks were recovered from fluralaner-treated dogs than from sarolaner-treated dogs at 24 h after re-infestation from Day 42 onwards. At 24 h, efficacy of fluralaner was ≤ 20 % from Day 42 to the end of the study on Day 90. There were no adverse reactions to treatment. Conclusions: In this controlled laboratory evaluation, monthly treatment with sarolaner provided consistent efficacy against A. americanum with > 70 % of ticks killed within 24 h after a single oral dose over the duration of the study. Monthly treatment with sarolaner consistently killed significantly more ticks within 24 h than a single dose of fluralaner from 6 weeks after initial treatment. © 2016 The Author(s). Source

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