Entity

Time filter

Source Type

Lodi Vecchio, Italy

Wrzosek M.,Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences | Plonek M.,Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences | Zeira O.,Veterinary Hospital San Michele | Biezynski J.,Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Small Animal Practice | Year: 2014

A three-year-old Border collie was diagnosed with a bipartite atlas and bilateral forelimb hypodactyly. The dog showed signs of acute, non-progressive neck pain, general stiffness and right thoracic limb non-weight-bearing lameness. Computed tomography imaging revealed a bipartite atlas with abaxial vertical bone proliferation, which was the cause of the clinical signs. In addition, bilateral hypodactyly of the second and fifth digits was incidentally found. This report suggests that hypodactyly may be associated with atlas malformations. © 2014 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.


Zeira O.,Veterinary Hospital San Michele | Briola C.,Veterinary Hospital San Michele | Konar M.,Veterinary Hospital San Michele | Dumas M.P.,Veterinary Hospital San Michele | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine | Year: 2012

A 4-yr-old tiger (Panthera tigris) was referred with acute onset of severe abnormal consciousness. Neurological evaluation showed normal palpebral and corneal reflexes, normal pupil diameter with normal direct and consensual papillary light reflex, and absent menace response bilaterally. Diffuse forebrain lesion or focal lesion affecting the ascending reticular activating system was suspected. Complete blood examination and cerebrospinal fluid analysis were normal. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed an empty sella as the only result. Clostridium perfringens 104 to 10 7 colony-forming units/g were detected in fecal flora samples. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay identified serotype B counts with production of ε toxin. This toxin specifically accumulates in the central nervous system, where it causes acute neurological signs in humans, domestic animals, and wildlife. In this communication, the acute onset of neurological signs without evidence of trauma, vascular, metabolic, or inflammatory diseases may be caused by neurotoxicity due to C. perfringens. Copyright © 2012 by American Association of Zoo Veterinarians.


Zeira O.,Veterinary Hospital San Michele | Briola C.,Veterinary Hospital San Michele | Konar M.,Veterinary Hospital San Michele | Plonek M.,Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences | Papa V.,Emergency Veterinary Clinic
Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine | Year: 2013

An adult male Italian wolf (Canis lupus italicus) was presented with an abnormal gait. Neurologic examination showed thoracic kyphosis, paraparesis, decreased proprioception in the pelvic limbs, and normal spinal reflexes. Neurologic symptoms suggested a thoracolumbar spinal cord lesion. Pathologic findings included leukocytosis. Spinal radiographs revealed ventral spondylosis of T4/T5/T6, a poorly defined intervertebral disc space, and mild lysis of the vertebral margins. Multiple metallic foreign bodies were seen in the thoracic wall. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine detected increased signal intensity on fluid sensitive sequences of the vertebral bodies, the intervertebral disc, and surrounding soft tissues. These findings were interpreted as active discospondylitis at T4/T5. Medical therapy included antibiotic and analgesic treatment as well as movement restriction. Follow-up at 4 wk showed significant clinical and radiologic improvement. Discospondylitis should be included in the differential diagnosis in wolves with paresis. Copyright 2013 by American Association of Zoo Veterinarians.

Discover hidden collaborations