Veterinary Dispensary

Kesti, India

Veterinary Dispensary

Kesti, India
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Jeykumar M.,Veterinary Dispensary | Vinodkumar G.,Veterinary College and Research Institute | Bashir B.P.,Veterinary College and Research Institute | Krovvidi S.,Veterinary College and Research Institute
Veterinary World | Year: 2013

Aim: The present study was undertaken to ascertain the prevalence and drug sensitivity pattern of causative agents of mastitis in and around Namakkal, Tamilnadu, India. Materials and Methods: Atotal of 74 milk samples were collected and bacterial isolates from 72 samples were obtained and subjected to in-vitro chemotherapeutic sensitivity test. Results: Out of 72 samples, 32 (44.44%) were found positive for Staphylococci species, 4 (5.5%) for Streptococci species, 30 (41.66%) for E.coli and 6 (8.33%) for Klebsiella species. The drug sensitivity test performed irrespective of isolates, revealed sensitivity of organisms to various antibiotics and none of the isolates were found to be sensitive to penicillin G. Conclusion: Enrofloxacin was found to be more effective antibiotic among all the tested antibiotics.


Biradar S.S.,Veterinary Dispensary | Saravanan B.C.,Indian Veterinary Research Institute | Tewari A.K.,Indian Veterinary Research Institute | Sreekumar C.,Post Graduate Research Institute in Animal science | And 2 more authors.
Acta Parasitologica | Year: 2014

PCR-RFLP and nucleotide sequencing based genotyping of Toxoplasma gondii Indian isolates (Izatnagar and Chennai isolates and Chennai clone) vis-a vis RH-IVRI strain was conducted by targeting GRA6 as genetic marker. The 791 bp GRA6 product was PCR amplified from the genomic DNA of different T. gondii Indian isolates, including the RH-IVRI strain. Tru1I restriction endonuclease based PCR-RFLP of GRA6 sequence produced polymorphic digestion pattern that discriminated the virulent RH-IVRI strain (as type I) from the moderately virulent local isolates as type III. The PCR amplicon of T. gondii GRA6 from RH-IVRI strain as well as from the local isolates were cloned in cloning vector and custom sequenced. The nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of T. gondii isolates were aligned with that of the type I, II and III strains (RH, BEVERLEY, ME49, C56, TONT and NED) available in public domain and analyzed in silico using MEGA version 4.0 software. Nucleotide sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of GRA6 marker from the Indian isolates revealed a close genetic relationship with type III strains of T. gondii. Further, detection of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at positions 162 and 171 of the GRA6 marker, established the lineage of Indian isolates as type III. This is the first report on characterization of T. gondii lineage as type III in selective chicken population of India based on PCR-RFLP and sequence analysis of GRA6 gene. © 2014 Versita Warsaw.


Sripad K.,Veterinary Hospital Compound | Kowalli S.,Veterinary Hospital Compound | Metri R.,Veterinary Dispensary
International Journal of Pharma and Bio Sciences | Year: 2014

Krishnavalley breed of cattle is an indigenous breed of black soil along the river basin of Krishna predominantly and also Ghataprabha, Malaprabha and Tungabhadra rivers in Karnataka. Present study was conducted at Belgaum and Koppal districts of Karnataka and describes the normal reference values of serum biochemical and hematological parameters in male, female and also in different age groups (0-3 years, 3-6 years and 6-9 years) of Krishnavalley breed of cattle. Fifteen blood samples each were collected from male and female and ten samples each were collected from different age group of animals, taking all aseptic precautions. Serum biochemical and hematological parameters were determined, statistically analyzed and set as reference values for male, female and different age groups of animals, which serve as baseline values for comparison of normal, various physiological, nutritional and deficiency conditions in male, female and also for different age groups of Krishnavalley breed of cattle.


Bam J.,National Research Center on Yak | Rai S.,Veterinary Dispensary
Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge | Year: 2015

Leeches are a nuisance to the livestock and human living in the hills of North Eastern parts of India. The people living in this region have learnt to control and manage leeches through various indigenous methods acquired through generations of practice. The present study is an attempt to document the indigenous traditional practices of used by Galo and Monpa tribes of Arunachal Pradesh and Lepcha, Bhutia and Nepalis of Sikkim against blood feeding leeches. The data were collected through an open ended interview schedule to five key informants of each study area. The study has identified a variety of herbal and non-herbal based methods used to control, prevent and kill leeches. © 2015, National Institute of Science Communication and Information Resources (NISCAIR). All rights reserved.


Kishore K.,Veterinary Dispensary | Harikrishna C.,Livestock Research Institute LRI
Buffalo Bulletin | Year: 2013

A study was carried out to fi nd out various buffalo management practices adopted by the farmers in Khammam district of Andhra Pradesh. More than half of the farmers under survey (58%) were able to provide insemination or natural service to their animals in heat at the right time, while 42% of farmers were unable to inseminate their animals in time due to various reasons. Only 16.66% farmers utilized the facility of artifi cial insemination, while 37.51% farmers opted for natural service. About 85.85% farmers fed green and dry roughage in combination and provided clean drinking water to their animals, but none of the farmer practiced silage making or other special treatments like chaffi ng, soaking or urea treating paddy straw. Most of the farmers collected fodder from the fi elds. Only 3% farmers fed additional concentrates to pregnant animals; the rest did not do this. As a part of summer management, 51% farmers allowed their buffaloes to wallow in the village tanks during the hotter parts of the day and 49.16% farmers washed their animals by splashing water manually. Washing of the animals and of their udders before milking were practiced by 15.68 and 98.40% farmers, respectively. Non-descript buffaloes were predominant in this region and the majority of the farmers were poor in certain aspects of scientifi c feeding, breeding, housing, milking and health care practices and needed to be educated. Artifi cial insemination should be made available to all the farmers, which in turn would result in the upgrading of local buffaloes and improving their performance.


Nagaraju R.,Veterinary Dispensary | Suresh B.N.,Veterinary College | Ramesh C.,Veterinary Dispensary
Indian Journal of Animal Sciences | Year: 2014

An experiment was conducted to study the efficacy of humic acid (HA) based product as a substitute for antibiotic in broilers. Two basal diets, viz. moderate (BIS 1992) and low nutrient density diets (3.5% lesser ME and CP than BIS 1992 specification) were formulated. Low and moderate nutrient density basal diets without antibiotic were served negative controls and with added antibiotic became positive controls. Further, moderate and low nutrient density diets were supplemented with 0.5, 0.75 or 1g HA based product per kg of feed to result in 6 test diets. Each of such diets prepared for starter (0-14 days), grower (15-28 days) and finisher (29-42 days) phases were offered to duplicate groups of 14 chicks each. The results revealed significantly higher body weight gains in moderate density diet with 0.1% HA during starter phase, more feed consumption in low nutrient density diet with 0.075% HA during finisher stage and better feed efficiency in moderate density diet with 0.075% HA. However, the cumulative body weight gain, feed consumption and feed efficiency including net returns were comparable among different treatments during 42-day trial. Metabolizability of dry matter and crude protein was significantly high in groups fed moderate nutrient density diet than low nutrient density diets however, no definite trend was observed with HA supplementation. At the termination of 42-day-trial, no significant differences were observed in dressing percentage, breast-meat yield, abdominal fat pad, relative weights of liver, heart, gizzard, spleen and bursa among different treatments. On 10-day post-vaccination, the ND titer values were statistically similar among different treatments while improved IBD titer values of birds were observed in HA supplanted groups. It was concluded that the addition of HA up to 0.1% particularly in the low nutrient density antibiotic free diets can improve the performance and immune status of broilers without affecting their carcass characteristics.


Therapeutic efficacy of certain poly herbal formulations and probiotics along with heterologous cud transplantation was evaluated in simple indigestion in buffaloes. A total of 18 buffaloes suffering from simple indigestion were treated with Suruchi bolus (10 g twice daily) or Gastricare powder (15g twice daily) or Yeasacc bolus with heterologous cud from healthy sheep. Clinical examination and laboratory analysis of rumen fluid and serum was carried out. Rumen fluid was evaluated for pH, protozoal motility, iodophilic activity, protozoal count, sedimentation activity time, methylene blue reduction time, total protozoa, gas production, ammonia, total volatile fatty acids. In serum, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, glucose, urea, protein was estimated. All the treatment regimens were successful in ameliorating the changes in rumen liquor and serum biochemical profile. However, treatment with YHC treatment with probiotic Yeasacc bolus + heterologous cud transfer performed better than herbal drugs.


PubMed | Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Veterinary Biological & Research Institute, Veterinary Dispensary, The Pirbright Institute and 3 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Transboundary and emerging diseases | Year: 2016

Bluetongue (BT) is a viral disease of ruminants and is caused by different serotypes of bluetongue virus (BTV), which is transmitted by several species of Culicoides midges. The disease is endemic in tropical areas, and incursions have been observed in some of the temperate areas. Twenty-seven recognized serotypes of BTV have been reported so far. Some serotype viruses have been shown to circulate in certain geographical areas. BTV-24 has been reported from Africa, the Mediterranean and the Americas, whereas it is exotic to Australasia. Here, we report isolation of BTV-24 from India and show that it has high sequence homology in genome segment 2 with other Western isolates of BTV-24. Entry of this serotype into Australasian region is a cause of concern.


PubMed | Veterinary Dispensary
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Acta parasitologica | Year: 2014

PCR-RFLP and nucleotide sequencing based genotyping of Toxoplasma gondii Indian isolates (Izatnagar and Chennai isolates and Chennai clone) vis-a vis RH-IVRI strain was conducted by targeting GRA6 as genetic marker. The 791 bp GRA6 product was PCR amplified from the genomic DNA of different T. gondii Indian isolates, including the RH-IVRI strain. Tru1I restriction endonuclease based PCR-RFLP of GRA6 sequence produced polymorphic digestion pattern that discriminated the virulent RH-IVRI strain (as type I) from the moderately virulent local isolates as type III. The PCR amplicon of T. gondii GRA6 from RH-IVRI strain as well as from the local isolates were cloned in cloning vector and custom sequenced. The nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of T. gondii isolates were aligned with that of the type I, II and III strains (RH, BEVERLEY, ME49, C56, TONT and NED) available in public domain and analyzed in silico using MEGA version 4.0 software. Nucleotide sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of GRA6 marker from the Indian isolates revealed a close genetic relationship with type III strains of T. gondii. Further, detection of a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at positions 162 and 171 of the GRA6 marker, established the lineage of Indian isolates as type III. This is the first report on characterization of T. gondii lineage as type III in selective chicken population of India based on PCR-RFLP and sequence analysis of GRA6 gene.


PubMed | Veterinary Dispensary
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of parasitic diseases : official organ of the Indian Society for Parasitology | Year: 2015

Larvae of Cobboldia elephantis have been reported from the stomach of a free ranging wild elephant (Elephas maximus) while conducting post mortem examination at Palamner forest range, Chittoor district of Andhra Pradesh state, India. This is the first report of C. elephantis in free ranging wild elephant in Andhra Pradesh state, India.

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