Hebbal, India
Hebbal, India

Time filter

Source Type

News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Goodnewsforpets.com, a pet news digital platform of Germinder & Associates, Inc., today announced its sponsorship of the national NY Dog Film Festival. The sponsorship kicks off with a contest and announcement of the Goodnewsforpets #GoodDogsInFilm promotion, a year-long celebration of beloved dog stars of all kinds, past and present. “The idea of the #GoodDogsInFilm promotion came about after attending the venerable Sundance Film Festival. Sundance is an amazing experience, and true to the spirit of the festival, it nurtured an idea. I thought Goodnewsforpets.com could play an important part in showcasing the role of dogs in films in a very positive way. They enrich the film-going experience – from the earliest dog film stars to home-grown movies to blockbuster films. We will celebrate all of them and more with this promotion, starting with the NY Dog Film Festival,” said Lea-Ann Germinder, Founder and Publisher of Goodnewsforpets.com. Tracie Hotchner, founder and director of the NY Dog Film Festival is a well-known pet wellness advocate and author and recognized as the premiere voice for pets and their people on pet talk radio. Hotchner recently interviewed Germinder on her Dog Talk® radio show about Goodnewsforpets, working with veterinarians and pet professionals and the NY Dog Film Festival. The interview can be found here. “When Goodnewsforpets.com wanted to join forces with the NY Dog Film Festival, I was delighted to make a partnership with Lea-Ann and together go forward bringing the world Good News for Pets!" Hotchner commented, adding “I’m delighted to bring animal lovers together to share a communal experience of watching short films that celebrate the remarkable bond between people and dogs, while recognizing the great work of local animal organizations.” To enter the contest, go to NY Dog Film Festival Founder Tracie Hotchner’s blog post and find the special keyword to enter the contest. Entrants have the chance to win one of three copies of the American Veterinary College of Behaviorists’ book “Decoding Your Dog” together with three exclusive Elena Kriegner Goodnewsforpets sterling silver Heart-Paw charms. A personal donation in each winner’s name will also be made to a local dog rescue or shelter of his or her choice. Enter by April 28, 2017 for a chance to win here! Follow Goodnewsforpets on Twitter @goodnewsforpets and Facebook facebook.com/goodnewforpets   About Goodnewsforpets.com & Germinder & Associates, Inc. Goodnewsforpets.com curates news of interest and importance to informed pet parents inclusive of the pet industry and veterinary profession. The award-winning site was launched in 2000. Germinder & Associates is an award-winning New York City based agency that provides strategic counsel, digital publishing content, and national campaigns for niche markets including animal health and pet products. For more information contact Lea-Ann Germinder, President and Founder at Lgerminder@germinder.com or 212-367-2170. About the NY Dog Film Festival In 2015 the first NY Dog Film Festival™ premiered in New York City, which grew out of Tracie Hotchner’s desire as a pet wellness advocate to expand her Radio Pet Lady Network’s outreach to educate the public about adoption, health issues and philosophical aspects of pets in our lives. Hotchner created the Festival as a unique way of honoring dogs as true family members by bringing together like-minded people to experience the remarkable human-canine bond on film. The NY Dog Film Festival™ shares proceeds from its ticket sales with local shelters wherever it travels. For more information about the films, other 2017 destination cities, and how to buy tickets visit http://www.dogfilmfestival.com.


Vijesh A.M.,Gandhi Institute of Technology and Management | Isloor A.M.,National Institute of Technology Karnataka | Sundershan S.,Veterinary College | Fun H.K.,King Saud University
European Journal of Medicinal Chemistry | Year: 2013

Azole class of compounds are well known for their excellent therapeutic properties. Present paper describes about the synthesis of three series of new 1,2,4-triazole and benzoxazole derivatives containing substituted pyrazole moiety (11a-d, 12a-d and 13a-d). The newly synthesized compounds were characterized by spectral studies and also by C, H, N analyses. All the synthesized compounds were screened for their analgesic activity by the tail flick method. The antimicrobial activity of the new derivatives was also performed by Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) by the serial dilution method. The results revealed that the compound 11c having 2,5-dichlorothiophene substituent on pyrazole moiety and a triazole ring showed significant analgesic and antimicrobial activity. © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.


Karabasanavar N.S.,Veterinary College | Singh S.P.,University of Veterinary and Animal Sciences | Shebannavar S.N.,Indian Immunologicals Ltd
Food Chemistry | Year: 2014

We describe a highly specific PCR assay for the authentic identification of pork. Accurate detection of tissues derived from pig (Sus scrofa) was accomplished by using newly designed primers targeting porcine mitochondrial displacement (D-loop) region that yielded an unique amplicon of 712 base pairs (bp). Possibility of cross-amplification was precluded by testing as many as 24 animal species (mammals, birds, rodent and fish). Suitability of PCR assay was confirmed in raw (n = 20), cooked (60, 80 and 100 C), autoclaved (121 C) and micro-oven processed pork. Sensitivity of detection of pork in other species meat using unique pig-specific PCR was established to be at 0.1%; limit of detection (LOD) of pig DNA was 10 pg (pico grams). The technique can be used for the authentication of raw, processed and adulterated pork and products under the circumstances of food adulteration related disputes or forensic detection of origin of pig species. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Rao S.,Veterinary College | Shettar M.,Institute of Animal Health and Veterinary Biological Hebbal
International Journal of Pharma and Bio Sciences | Year: 2014

The present study was taken up to evaluate the efficacy of Trigonella foenum graecum and Coccinia indica individualy and in combination in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats for a period of 90 days. The various groups in this study included normal control (Group-I), diabetic control (Group-II), diabetic rats treated with Trigonella foenum graecum (Group-III), diabetic rats treated with Coccinia indica (Group-IV), diabetic rats treated with Trigonella foenum graecum and Coccinia indica (Group-V) respectively. There was significant variation in biochemical and pathomorphological parameters of diabetic rats when compared to normal control rats. The alleviation of the diabetic and its complications induced by streptozotocin was observed in all the treatment groups with variable degree of improvement. Trigonella foenum graecum and Coccinia indica extracts were effective in alleviating streptozotocin induced diabetes. Combination of Trigonella foenum graecum and Coccinia indica showed better improvement compared to individual extract alone and improvement was statistically significant. However the combined treatment of Trigonella foenum graecum and Coccinia indica revealed a very good antidiabetic effect with reference to improvement in insulin level and beta cell number which indicated a synergistic effect between Trigonella foenum graecum and Coccinia indica.


News Article | February 24, 2017
Site: phys.org

Scientists at Cornell University's College of Veterinary Medicine have devised genetic tests that can detect the environmental DNA (eDNA) of invasive species in a waterway before they become established there. But there are more than 7,600 freshwater lakes and ponds and over 70,000 miles of rivers and streams in New York State, all of them potential conduits for the unwelcome species. How can the Cornell team watch them all for signs of a potential invasion? The answer: teams of young citizen scientists from schools located near a lake, river, or creek, who gather water samples to send to Cornell for analysis. Dr. Donna Cassidy-Hanley, a senior research associate at the Cornell Veterinary College, had already worked with teachers across New York state to provide hands-on resources for teaching basic science. Teaming up with Cornell Professor James Casey, who developed the genetic tests, Cassidy-Hanley went back to those teachers with a new proposal: Engage your students in a hands-on research project with Cornell scientists that introduces them to invasive species, ecology, environmental management, and bio-informatics, and that has important real world impact. The response has been amazing. "We had hoped to get five or six teachers involved in the pilot program," says Hanley-Cassidy. "We currently have 60 teachers across the state." Students at schools from New York City to small rural upstate towns have joined in the effort to monitor the spread of invasive fish, contributing critical data and learning about science firsthand. Cornell sends participating classes free kits containing everything needed to collect water samples. Sample collection starts in the spring as soon as the ice melts and continues until the waters freeze in the fall. Cornell shares detailed test results with teachers and students as soon as the analyses are complete, providing a platform for further learning and discussion. Some classes travel to Cornell to see the laboratory where their samples are tested. Casey is impressed with the quality of the samples. "I was surprised at how well the program works," he says. "Round goby have been identified at 38 separate sites across the state, including two sites in areas where round goby had not previously been found." The program is supported in part by a USDA HATCH grant, which covers activities in New York state. Word is spreading and teachers from other states are expressing interest in the possibility of similar program,The feedback from teachers and students is very encouraging. Student interest is high, even among students with little past interest in science, and extracurricular groups like ecology clubs have become involved. "Activities like this can have a game changing influence on attitudes and interests," Cassidy-Hanley says. "Seeing firsthand how invasives can affect fishing and boating, as well as the environment and the economy, helps students understand that science has a real impact on daily life." Maps that show participants and test results across the state can be seen by visiting tetrahymenaasset.vet.cornell.edu/invasive-fish-program/edna-testing-results/ . The map on that page is not interactive, but the four species-specific links above it connect to maps that are. Explore further: Study finds cash and coins help engage primary maths students


News Article | February 24, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Invasive aquatic species like round goby, Asian carp, and sea lamprey are a growing problem in New York State. Their presence impacts water quality, food supply, recreation and tourism, as well as human and animal health. Early detection is a critical first step in monitoring a species' spread and managing responses. Scientists at Cornell University's College of Veterinary Medicine have devised genetic tests that can detect the environmental DNA (eDNA) of invasive species in a waterway before they become established there. But there are more than 7,600 freshwater lakes and ponds and over 70,000 miles of rivers and streams in New York State, all of them potential conduits for the unwelcome species. How can the Cornell team watch them all for signs of a potential invasion? The answer: teams of young citizen scientists from schools located near a lake, river, or creek, who gather water samples to send to Cornell for analysis. Dr. Donna Cassidy-Hanley, a senior research associate at the Cornell Veterinary College, had already worked with teachers across New York state to provide hands-on resources for teaching basic science. Teaming up with Cornell Professor James Casey, who developed the genetic tests, Cassidy-Hanley went back to those teachers with a new proposal: Engage your students in a hands-on research project with Cornell scientists that introduces them to invasive species, ecology, environmental management, and bio-informatics, and that has important real world impact. The response has been amazing. "We had hoped to get five or six teachers involved in the pilot program," says Hanley-Cassidy. "We currently have 60 teachers across the state." Students at schools from New York City to small rural upstate towns have joined in the effort to monitor the spread of invasive fish, contributing critical data and learning about science firsthand. Cornell sends participating classes free kits containing everything needed to collect water samples. Sample collection starts in the spring as soon as the ice melts and continues until the waters freeze in the fall. Cornell shares detailed test results with teachers and students as soon as the analyses are complete, providing a platform for further learning and discussion. Some classes travel to Cornell to see the laboratory where their samples are tested. Casey is impressed with the quality of the samples. "I was surprised at how well the program works," he says. "Round goby have been identified at 38 separate sites across the state, including two sites in areas where round goby had not previously been found." The program is supported in part by a USDA HATCH grant, which covers activities in New York state. Word is spreading and teachers from other states are expressing interest in the possibility of similar program, The feedback from teachers and students is very encouraging. Student interest is high, even among students with little past interest in science, and extracurricular groups like ecology clubs have become involved. "Activities like this can have a game changing influence on attitudes and interests," Cassidy-Hanley says. "Seeing firsthand how invasives can affect fishing and boating, as well as the environment and the economy, helps students understand that science has a real impact on daily life." Maps that show participants and test results across the state can be seen by visiting https:/ . The map on that page is not interactive, but the four species-specific links above it connect to maps that are.


Manafi M.,University of Malayer | Mohan K.,Veterinary College | Ali M.N.,Herat University
World Mycotoxin Journal | Year: 2011

A study was conducted to evaluate the effects of ochratoxin A (OTA) on broiler chicks challenged with Eimeria tenella oocysts. Two hundred day-old, unsexed Cobb broiler chicks were randomly divided into four treatment groups. Each treatment consisted of five replicates and ten chicks per replicate, making the following treatments: group I: control; group II: OTA (1 mg/kg) daily through feed; group III: coccidia (orally inoculated with 50,000 E. tenella oocysts/chick on day 21); group IV: OTA (1 mg/kg) daily through feed + coccidia (orally inoculated with 50,000 E. tenella oocysts/chick on day 21). Six birds from each group were slaughtered on the 5th, 7th, 9 th and 11th day post infection. The results showed higher mortality with severe gross lesions in caecum and a greater number of faecal oocysts in groups III and IV. The gross lesions observed in group IV were characterised by distension of caecum with blood-tinged content indicative of haemorrhagic typhlitis with mucosal tissue debris. Microscopically, lymphoid organs revealed severe lymphocytolysis and depletion with cellular sparsity in OTA treated groups. The increased severity of lesions in the caecum of group IV was attributed to the additive effect of OTA and E. tenella. Caecum exhibited severe haemorrhages, the presence of numerous second generation schizonts, matured merozoites and developing oocysts. Group IV showed an increase in the severity of coccidiosis which is due to the immunosuppressive effect of OTA. Thus, it was concluded that the expression of E. tenella and its pathological effects were maximum in the presence of OTA compared to the incidence of coccidiosis alone in broiler chicks. © 2011 Wageningen Academic Publishers.


Shridhar N.B.,Veterinary College
Indian Journal of Animal Research | Year: 2010

The present study revealed the natural toxicity of a neonicotinoid insecticide imidacloprid on buffaloes which expressed the clinical signs of frothy salivation, in-coordination to move, stiff gait and dyspnoea. The haematological parameters like haemoglobin, packed cell volume (PCV), total erythrocyte count (TEC), total leucocyte count (TLC) and differential leucocyte counts(DLC) were not altered in the affected animals. There was no change in the concentrations of serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN) except a slight increase in aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) concentrations.


Shridhar N.B.,Veterinary College
Indian Journal of Animal Research | Year: 2011

Perineal hernia is an uncommon phenomenon in cattle. A case of perineal hernia in a HF crossbred cow was surgically corrected. The urinary bladder was herniated into the vaginal folds and formed a perineal hernia. The same was corrected using a proper surgical technique and the cow recovered uneventfully.


Suresh B.N.,Veterinary College | Reddy B.S.V.,Veterinary College
Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences | Year: 2011

Sugarcane press residue (SPR), a byproduct from the sugar industry was evaluated for it's nutrient and energetic quality in broilers and layers. The composition of SPR included (% DM): CP-11.76 (methionine-2.21, cystine-1.05, lysine-4.85, threonine-5.48% of CP), EE-7.87 (palmitic acid-30.3, stearic acid-4.1, oleic aicd-17.2, linoleic acid-38.0, linolenic acid-5.4% of EE), CF-10.08, TA-21.08 (Ca-3.87, P-1.10, Mg-0.95%, Fe-3500, Mn-284, Zn-113, Cu-61.5, Co-5.0 ppm and AIA-4.93%) and NFE-48.35% indicating that SPR is a valuable source of both organic and inorganic nutrients for poultry. The metabolic trials revealed the average ME of SPR as 749, 842 and 1,270 kcal/kg, respectively in broilers and 844, 936 and 1,031 kcal/kg in layers, at 10, 20 and 30% inclusion levels, respectively. Further, the fortification of SPR incorporated diets with biotechnological products viz., lipid utilizing agents (lipase and lecithin) or NSP degrading enzymes and their combination did not improve the ME content of such diets.

Loading Veterinary College collaborators
Loading Veterinary College collaborators