Veterinary Clinic

Bad Langensalza, Germany

Veterinary Clinic

Bad Langensalza, Germany
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

LOS ANGELES, April 30, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Dog owners should understand the importance of getting their dogs vaccinated to prevent canine influenza and avoid potential deaths of beloved pets. After recent outbreaks of canine influenza in LA and that in Chicago last year, Hancock Park Veterinary Clinic recommends that vaccination should be a priority for pet owners. Dogs need to get both doses of the vaccine, three weeks apart, to benefit from full protection against the influenza virus. While there currently isn’t any indication that canine influenza will result in an epidemic in LA, dog owners need to know how to take steps to protect their pet from contracting the virus and associated infection. Canine influenza is highly contagious and often results in a potentially deadly infection from the virus. On March 31, 2017, Veterinary Public Health was alerted to the possibility of a respiratory outbreak in imported dogs that had tested positive for canine influenza H3N2, one strain of the virus. All dogs associated with the LA outbreak have been placed under quarantine and further tests are pending. Dogs are susceptible to contracting canine influenza when in close contact with an infected animal. “The word is out on the recent canine influenza outbreak in LA. Rest assured that Hancock Park Veterinary Clinic has the vaccine,” said Dr. White. “The best action to take at this time is to have pets in for a vaccination to protect against canine influenza. The outbreak in Chicago last year was scary for many pet owners and vets could be seen doing exams in the parking lot in cars in efforts to prevent the spread of the disease. Given what happened in Chicago last year, and how quickly getting all dogs vaccinated helped to control the problem, I do feel that vaccinating pets is a very good idea.” Concerned pet owners should get dogs in quickly for their vaccination. Remember that the vaccine itself requires two doses, three weeks apart. After that, a dog needs an annual vaccine update. A dog is not fully protected for 6-8 weeks after the initial dose, and only receives complete protection with the second dose. Any dog that has already been infected should be kept in isolation for three weeks. Dr. White of Hancock Park Veterinary Clinic serves residents of Los Angeles, CA and the surrounding areas. The staff at this full-service veterinary clinic offers skilled and compassionate veterinary services to beloved pets and their owners. Services for dogs, cats, small mammals, and avian patients include vaccinations, veterinary medical care, dental care, surgery, preventative and wellness care, and routine medical care. Call (323) 936-6952 to learn more about canine influenza or to schedule a vaccination. Visit http://hancockparkvetclinic.com/ for more details.


COUNCIL BLUFFS, Iowa, March 26, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- MediVet stem cell therapy, offered at Animal Clinic of Council Bluffs and Glenwood Veterinary Clinic, provides pets and owners with a way to address health concerns in cats and dogs. Pet owners can address conditions such as arthritis, fracture, soft tissue damage and more with advanced stem cell therapy. The procedure and processing are done on-site and pets can return home the same day. Pet owners can improve the quality of life for aging or injured cats and dogs. Enjoy the companionship of beloved pets for years to come with stem cell therapy at Animal Clinic of Council Bluffs and Glenwood Veterinary Clinic. MediVet offers an advanced stem cell therapy that uses a pet’s own stem cells for a session. This allows pet owners the ability to tap into a beloved pet’s own inherent ability to heal without ethical concerns. Dormant stem cells are separated from fat cells and once stimulated, can be reintroduced into damaged areas to facilitate the healing process. Stem cell therapy can benefit pets with arthritis, soft tissue damage, fractures, degenerative myelopathy, liver and kidney failure, auto-immune conditions and more. There have not been any significant negative side-effects observed from thousands of animals that have been treated with MediVet’s stem cell therapy. This low-risk treatment has helped over 95 percent of animals show improvement. Aging pets can experience discomfort, arthritis, and degenerative joint disease. Stem cells taken from a pet and reintroduced do not result in a risk of rejection and activated stem cells can become any cell needed. Stem cell therapy can significantly improve the ability of a pet to move and reduce pain. A vet places a pet under general anesthesia before collecting 2-4 tablespoons of fat. A highly trained vet tech processes the sample taken. It only takes approximately 20 minutes to collect the fat required. Stem cells are re-administered on site and the pet can go home the day of the procedure. “We are pleased to offer pets and owners this advanced treatment that can facilitate the healing process for a range of health conditions,” said Dr. Melissa Harrer. “Stem cell therapy helps with arthritic symptoms and more and often improves mobility. Learn whether or not your pet is a candidate for this revolutionary procedure today.” Dr. Melissa Harrer of Animal Clinic of Council Bluffs and Glenwood Veterinary Clinic serves pets and residents in and around their two locations. Patients receive the highest level of veterinary care at these full-service small animal clinics. Services include comprehensive wellness exams, heartworm and intestinal parasite testing, oral health care, appropriate pharmaceuticals, preventative immunizations, and behavior counseling. Call (712) 323-0598 to learn about stem cell therapy treatments for pets or visit http://animalclinicofcb.com/ for more information.


CASTLE ROCK, Colo., April 23, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- April is Heartworm Awareness Month for pets and Brekke Veterinary Clinic of Castle Rock is taking this opportunity to remind area pet owners about the risks and hazards of heartworm. These risks can become particularly pronounced during the spring season when mosquitoes become more active.  Dogs, in particular, are at high risk for heartworm, and the disease is fatal for many of them if left untreated. An estimated one million dogs in the U.S. currently have heartworm disease, according to the American Heartworm Society. Heartworm is also a threat to cats who venture outdoors. Heartworms are spread by infected mosquitoes, and they take residence within the hearts, lungs and pulmonary arteries of animals that have been bitten. The worms can grow up to one foot long and multiply within the body. Heartworm can eventually lead to heart failure as well as damage to the other organs in the body. Fortunately, heartworm is preventable. If detected after it has spread, the pet will require extensive treatment including X-rays, vaccinations, and close monitoring of their progress. However, the prevention of heartworm disease can be as simple as giving pets a monthly medication. Most pet owners find heartworm prevention costs to be a small price to pay for their pet’s health and safety. By contrast, treating an advanced case of heartworm can be costly in terms of the pet’s suffering and loss of quality of life. It is essential to stay on top of heartworm prevention in dogs and cats. Again, the spring season is “heartworm season,” but infected mosquitoes can potentially strike pets any time of the year, especially in temperate climates.       Castle Rock Veterinarian Brekke Veterinary Clinic carries a number of effective solutions for heartworm prevention, including Interceptor® Plus monthly flavored tablets. A simple heartworm blood test is recommended annually for early detection. In addition to heartworm prevention, Brekke Veterinary Clinic also provides a full suite of veterinary services including full exams, preventative care, surgery, cardiology, internal medicine, oncology, dermatology, dentistry, emergency care, and more. Head Veterinarian Dr. Jay Brekke, DVM says, “We know that people regard their pets as members of the family, and we treat every animal with care and respect. Heartworm is a very serious issue, and we encourage all pet owners to take the easy steps required to help prevent it. April is Heartworm Awareness Month, so this is the perfect time to promote awareness about this important pet health issue.” Those in the public who wish to learn more about the services available at Brekke Veterinary Clinic, or those who wish to book an appointment, may do so by calling (303) 474-4260. Additional information about the practice can also be accessed on their website at http://brekkevet.com/.


News Article | May 5, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Pets bring laughter, joy and love into people’s homes without asking for much in return. As a token of appreciation, pet owners celebrate National Pet Week, which falls on the first full week of May. These seven days, spanning May 7-May 13 in 2017, remind pet owners to cherish the human-animal bond and to recognize responsible pet ownership. Pet owners can live out these values by following action items outlined by National Pet Week’s theme this year, “Lifetime of Love—The Basics: Seven Days to a Happier, Healthier Pet.” Adhering to this advice fosters a lifetime of health, happiness and love for pets. The first day, May 7, highlights the importance of individuals selecting pets that mesh well with their lifestyles and making a firm commitment to caring for pets. Monday, May 8, encourages pet owners to socialize pets early and prep them for an array of interactions with places, activities, animals and people. This will make for positive experiences in any situation. Day three urges pet owners and their pets to engage in regular exercise, which will curb the obesity rate among dogs and cats in the U.S. “An overweight or obese animal has a higher risk for arthritis, respiratory compromise, diabetes, skin problems, increased surgical risks, heart disease and a reduced lifespan,” said Carol Hillhouse, DVM, DABVP, of Carson Veterinary Clinic and High Plains Animal Hospital in the Texas Panhandle. “Your veterinarian is your best resource for determining whether your pet is in an unhealthy weight range and developing a plan to fight obesity.” Dr. Hillhouse’s recommendation to visit the veterinarian encompasses the advice of day four, and Thursday, May 11, raises awareness of the pet overpopulation problem, which can be prevented by spays/neuters. Friday brings the suggestion of developing emergency kits for the unexpected incidents of life, such as natural disasters. The last day, Saturday, summarizes the week’s advice, which is giving pets a lifetime of love and improving their quality and length of life by taking them in for regular veterinary exams and providing care. National Pet Week was created by the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) in 1981. Observed each year during the first full week of May, National Pet Week recognizes the human-animal bond and responsible pet ownership by encouraging pet owners to celebrate pet companionship, a mission also upheld by the Texas Veterinary Medical Association (TVMA). For more information on National Pet Week, visit http://www.petweek.org. About the Texas Veterinary Medical Association Founded in 1903, the Texas Veterinary Medical Association is a professional association composed of more than 3,700 veterinarians committed to protecting public health, promoting high educational, ethical and moral standards within the veterinary profession and educating the public about animal health and its relationship to human health. For more information, call 512/452-4224 or visit http://www.tvma.org.


News Article | May 13, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

With massive tornadoes hitting Texas the end of April, taking at least four lives, injuring dozens more and destroying countless homes, it couldn’t be more timely to recognize National Animal Disaster Preparedness Day. The awareness event serves as a call-to-action to prepare for not only tornadoes but also all types of emergencies, and the Texas Veterinary Medical Association (TVMA) urges pet owners to include pets in disaster preparation plans. One of the key components of developing a disaster preparation plan is establishing an evacuation strategy, which involves determining how to get your pets safely out of the house and off the property and finding a safe place to stay. Many disaster shelters do not accept pets, so find one that does ahead of time or secure an alternative safe haven for your pets. Consider making arrangements for boarding in case of home destruction. In addition to dogs and cats, it is crucial to plan ahead and make sure farm animals and livestock are also accounted for. It is important to assemble a survival kit for each of your pets. Just as humans need food, water and additional items such as medication, pets will need an ample supply of these things as well. In the kits, there should be at least three days worth of food and water, photos of pets for identification, proof of health care, emergency contact information and your veterinarian’s contact information. The American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) has species-specific guides and resources available to the public to ensure you have all possible necessities. Making sure your pet is properly identified is also imperative. If your pets happen to get lost during an evacuation or a disaster, you will have a much better chance of finding them if they are microchipped and tagged. It is also important to maintain an up-to-date contact information list with phone numbers for the veterinarian, fire department, police station, animal shelter and the nearest relative or friend who could shelter your pet. “We may not always be together at home with our family and pets when disaster strikes, so we have to be prepared to communicate with and relocate our family and pets,” said TVMA Immediate Past President Sam Miller, DVM, of Village Veterinary Clinic in Houston. “In the event you are away from home, it would be a good idea for a neighbor or family member to have access to your house so they can assist in your disaster response.” About the Texas Veterinary Medical Association Founded in 1903, the Texas Veterinary Medical Association is a professional association composed of more than 3,700 veterinarians committed to protecting public health, promoting high educational, ethical and moral standards within the veterinary profession and educating the public about animal health and its relationship to human health. For more information, call 512/452-4224 or visit http://www.tvma.org. ###


News Article | December 2, 2016
Site: www.24-7pressrelease.com

INDIAN RIVER COUNTY, FL, December 02, 2016-- Vero Vine, which promotes positive change in your Treasure Coast community and maintains the most comprehensive vero beach events calendar in Indian River County, announces the roll out of its popular, and second annual Best Holiday Decor Photo Contest this December.The contest seeks to track down the most "liked" holiday decorations in the region, with first, second, third, and fourth place prizes. Always a most creative and raffle prize to keep things in good spirits. The six prizes bring the overall grand total to over $1,700 to be distributed to its festive winners! Vero Vine's editors will determine the winners from the top ten most "liked" photos posted to Vero Vine's Contest page.Submissions can be made at any time between December 1 and 31 at 11:59 p.m. EST, 2016. Prize winners will be announced on December 5, 2016 by 8:00 p.m. in the email newsletter. Prizes totaling over $1,700, as of November 30, from various local businesses include Felicity Images: A photo session with Nellie Quiros at Felicity Images, and a custom photo app with your favorite twenty images., valued at: $350. Elite Holiday Decor: A single $250 Gift Certificate., valued at: $250. Plank Pilates: Three (3) half hour (30 minute) sessions. , valued at: $150. Signature Art Gallery of Vero: A 16" x 20" print on HD Aluminum (Metal) or Canvas., valued at: $150. Vero Beach Karate Association: One Month of Karate Lessons, Includes Uniform, valued at: $120. Community Veterinary Clinic: A (one time) yearly pet wellness exam which includes all vaccines and a heartworm test., valued at: $100. Sea Turtle Real Estate: $100.00 gift certificate to Varietals and More, valued at: $100. Chaney's House O' Flowers: 1 Custom Bouquet of Flowers Delivered, valued at: $75. The Amber Ribbon: .925 Sterling Silver & Opal on an 18" Sterling Silver chain. , valued at: $69. Vero Vine will announce additional prizes as they are added.Sponsorship is open for this event, which is expected to reach more than 500,000 Treasure Coast residents. The very popular Vero's Best Dog Photo Contest, held a few months back, garnered more than 900 entries and over 400,000 views, 50,000 votes and included a photo entry of hometown celebrity Jake Owen's dog, Merle! For more information on sponsorship opportunities, individuals can contact Stacy Cook at (772) 233-6869 or stacy@verovine.com Top sponsorship is reserved for Elite Holiday Decor of Vero Beach and can be visited here www.eliteholidaydecor.com To submit an entry, individuals are encouraged to visit www.verovine.com where they may also subscribe for free to Vero Vine and receive full access to local information including a community focused weekly email newsletter. Submit any photo to www.verovine.com When individuals complete the steps described above they will be entered to win. Holiday decorations must be in the photo. Contestants may choose to be in the photo along with the decor and we encourage individuals to have fun with the contest. Here at Vero Vine, we like creativity. Most creative or fun photos will be posted to the main Vero Vine Facebook wall.Rooted in the heart of Vero Beach, Vero Vine branches out to residents, tourists and snow birds alike, by sharing all the positives, all the best professionals and all the wonderful places that the Treasure Coast has to offer. Vero Vine is an interactive resource community spotlighting the positive news, the personal stories and the professional opportunities in and around Vero Beach. From Real Estate to Photography, Food to local resources, events and community updates, Vero Vine is your online connection to all things positive, professional and popular in Vero Beach Florida.


News Article | February 12, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

CASTLE ROCK, Colo., Feb. 12, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- February is National Pet Dental Health Month. It's a time when animal hospitals, including Brekke Veterinary Clinic, emphasize how pet owners can improve pet health and comfort through dental exams and regular tooth brushing. Dr. Jay Brekke at Brekke Veterinary Clinic conducts pet dental exams, cleans plaque from teeth, and performs extractions when teeth are fractured or infected. To raise awareness for pet dental care Brekke Veterinary Clinic is offering $25 off any dental procedure during February! Brekke Veterinary Clinic also teaches owners one of the most effective methods for minimizing pet dental disease -- tooth brushing. Castle Rock veterinarian, Dr. Jay Brekke, DVM, says owners can protect pets against dental problems by learning how to gently brush their teeth once a day or at least once a week. To train your pet to be comfortable with a pet-size toothbrush, Dr. Brekke says, "Start by gently sliding one of your fingers up and down on your pet's teeth. After doing this daily for about a week, switch to a toothbrush and specially formulated toothpaste with a flavor your pet may enjoy, such as beef or seafood." Dr. Brekke also discusses the benefits of pet dental chews. Pets love brushing their teeth daily when it’s a treat! Signs of periodontal (gum) disease in pets include bad breath, bleeding gums, stained teeth and gums, swollen gums, damage such as chipping and cracking, and chewing problems that can result in an unwillingness to eat. The American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) notes that 70 percent of cats and 80 percent of dogs have periodontal disease by the time they are three years old, and that when considering pet products claiming they are helpful for dental health, such as treats or special diets, it's best to consult with veterinarian Dr. Brekke. "We're always willing to provide information helping customers to make the best choices for their pets," Dr. Brekke says. Mouth bacteria mixed with mucus and other particles leads to periodontal disease when it creates sticky, colorless plaque covering teeth. This substance hardens into tartar and reaches below the gum line creating pockets of bacteria that may harm internal organs as well as gums, teeth, and bone. To minimize stress to pets and to perform dentistry safely and efficiently, veterinarians need to anesthetize patients during teeth cleaning and other dental procedures. Brekke Veterinary Clinic provides comprehensive medical services for pets, including emergency surgery. Treatment of hunting dogs is one of its specialties. Regular business hours for Monday, Wednesday and Friday are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. On Tuesdays and Thursdays, the clinic is open an hour longer from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. After-hours emergency services and consulting are available Monday through Friday until midnight. Additional information is available on their website at http://brekkevet.com/.


News Article | September 16, 2012
Site: globenewswire.com

SASKATOON, Saskatchewan, Sept. 16, 2012 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- All West Veterinary Clinic announced that the dog and cat clinic now offers companion laser therapy for dogs and cats. Veterinarian Dr. Henry Kucharski is trained to use a Class IV laser, which was approved by the FDA for treating humans and animals in 2005. According to Dr. Kucharski, laser therapy helps to naturally manage pain, reduces inflammation and accelerates the recovery process. The practice incorporates laser therapy into a variety of different wellness and surgical procedures. This includes speeding the healing process following spay/neuter operations, declawing, dental cleanings and extractions, lick granulomas, feline acne, fractures, and arthritis. Veterinarian Dr. Henry Kucharski announced that he has had success with Class IV laser therapy for managing pain and speeding injury recovery. The pet service is available at Dr. Kucharski's animal hospital, All West Veterinary Clinic. "Class IV laser therapy is a revolutionary treatment that is changing veterinary care," said Dr. Kucharski. "Not all Saskatoon pet hospitals offer this treatment yet, so we are proud to provide our pet owners and pet patients with this elevated level of service. We are thrilled with the difference that this pet service makes for animals in need." Dr. Kucharski recommends laser therapy for managing pain. For example, an older dog who struggles with arthritis may not be a good candidate for orthopedic surgery. Laser therapy treatments, however, can help relieve pain in the hips and joints, without a lengthy rehabilitation period. According to the Saskatoon veterinarian, laser therapy helps manage pain by increasing the flow of blood. Improved circulation delivers fresh, oxygenated blood to injured tissues, which decreases inflammation and swelling. The animal hospital also recommends laser therapy for speeding the recovery process following a soft tissue injury or surgery. "Our Class IV laser penetrates deep beneath an animal's skin," said Dr. Kucharski. "In addition to stimulating blood flow, the laser decreases nerve sensitivity and reduces inflammation. This helps to relieve pain associated with an injury while accelerating the healing process." Veterinary laser therapy is typically administered over a series of eight to ten treatment sessions. Depending on a pet's wellness needs, a session may last between 10 to 30 minutes. For example, smaller cats suffering from feline acne require shorter treatment sessions than larger dogs with widespread arthritis and joint pain. "For many pets, relief is noticeable after just one or two treatment sessions," said Dr. Kucharski. "The benefits of laser therapy are cumulative, and we recommend completing the full series for maximum pain management and injury recovery assistance. Whenever possible, we integrate laser therapy into our veterinary treatment programs." In addition to laser therapy, the cat and dog clinic offers routine Saskatoon pet services. These services include vaccinations, wellness exams, pet surgery, and urgent care. Pet owners may schedule an appointment with veterinarian Dr. Kucharski by calling the veterinary clinic.


News Article | August 31, 2016
Site: phys.org

The zoo-keeper in charge of the carnivores had noticed that Terima Kashi wasn't using one side of his mouth to chew recently and notified the chief veterinarian. When the vet discovered the tiger had an infected canine, he decided to do a root canal. A team of five people including a specialist from Pistoia, Italy, took part in the three-hour operation Wednesday. Zoo veterinarian Dr. Klaus Friedrich told The Associated Press that Terima Kashi, which means "Thank You" in Indonesian, was recovering well. Friedrich said he can eat meat but won't be able to chew on bones for several days. Director of the Veterinary Clinic of the Rome zoo, Klaus G. Friedrich looks at Kashi, a 2-year-old male Sumatran tiger as she receives tooth surgery in the zoo's Veterinary Clinic in Rome, Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2016. Kashi, a young male suffering from pulp infection following the cracking of a canine tooth, received root canal therapy. (AP Photo/Domenico Stinellis) Kashi, a 2-year-old male Sumatran tiger of the Rome zoo, receives tooth surgery in the zoo's Veterinary Clinic in Rome, Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2016. Kashi, a young male suffering from pulp infection following the cracking of a canine tooth, received root canal therapy by dental surgeon Francesco Talini, sitting at right, and his team. (AP Photo/Domenico Stinellis) Kashi, a 2-year-old male Sumatran tiger of the Rome zoo, receives tooth surgery in the zoo's Veterinary Clinic in Rome, Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2016. Kashi, a young male suffering from pulp infection following the cracking of a canine tooth, received root canal therapy by dental surgeon Francesco Talini, right, and his team. (AP Photo/Domenico Stinellis) Kashi, a 2-year-old male Sumatran tiger of the Rome zoo, receives tooth surgery in the zoo's Veterinary Clinic in Rome, Wednesday, Aug. 31, 2016. Kashi, a young male suffering from pulp infection following the cracking of a canine tooth, received root canal therapy by dental surgeon Francesco Talini, sitting at right, and his team, assisted by the Director of the zoo's Veterinary Clinic Klaus G. Friedrich, right. (AP Photo/Domenico Stinellis) Explore further: Rare Sumatran tiger gives birth to three cubs


News Article | October 31, 2016
Site: www.chromatographytechniques.com

A domestic cat in Australia tested positive for a drug-resistant strain of salmonella, a first for the country. The cat, which was being housed at a shelter, was brought to Concord Veterinary Clinic in New South Wales with an upper respiratory infection, which developed into a gut infection during treatment. The bacteria was resistant to about nine classes of drugs, including carbapenems, the last line of defense against salmonella in Australia. The cat’s condition continued to deteriorate, and it was ultimately euthanized. "This is the first time that a Salmonella strain with resistance to most antimicrobial drugs has been reported in any Australian domestic animal and it is a significant concern to public health," said Sam Abraham, Murdoch University researcher who led a study to identify the characteristics and risks of the Salmonella bug. Abraham was assisted by fellow researchers from Concord Hospital, Sydney University and Adelaide University. Analysis of the stool sample showed that the cat was infected with a Salmonella bacteria carrying the highly resistant IMP-4 gene. Eight other cats that were at the vet clinic were also tested for the superbug. Three tested positive—two of which had no direct contact with the sick cat—suggesting that the bacterial species is highly transferable, according to the researchers. According to Richard Malik, from the University of Sydney who was brought in to oversee outbreak containment, one of the infected cats showed no symptoms, another was kept in the same room, but did not have direct contact and the third was being kept in a different room within the clinic. There is also a possibility that the resistance of the bacteria had been built up through exposure to heavy metals. The researchers believe this is also increasing its resistance to common antimicrobial drugs. The researchers noted that the outbreak has been contained to just the few additional cats, and they have not received any other reports. The only other time Australia has seen this level of antimicrobial resistance was in a seagull colony off New South Wales. How the birds were infected is still unknown. The study led by Abraham has been accepted for publication in Scientific Reports.

Loading Veterinary Clinic collaborators
Loading Veterinary Clinic collaborators