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News Article | January 13, 2016
Site: phys.org

The black Lab-mix dog shakes and shivers, her heart rate jumps, her blood pressure spikes, her temperature rises, her eyes dilate and she cowers under anything she can get beneath. After trying vet after vet for 14 years, the dog's owner Debby Trinen of Sandpoint, Idaho, has finally found relief for Joy's stress from a new approach to veterinary care called "fear-free." The fear-free movement aims to eliminate things in the vet's office that bother dogs and cats—like white lab coats, harsh lights and slippery, cold exam tables—while adding things they like. For example, a fear-free clinic "will have a big treat budget," said Dr. Marty Becker, the initiative's main cheerleader and the vet chosen to introduce it to the country. All the dogs and cats at his North Idaho Animal Hospital, where Joy now gets care, have space on their files to note favorite treats, from Easy Cheese to hot dogs. About 50 practices across the country have gone fear-free, Becker said. Later this year, the initiative will start certifying veterinary professionals. The certification takes about 12 hours of online instruction. The movement hopes to register as many as 5,000 people this year. Hospital certification could start in 2018, followed by animal shelters and homes, Becker said. Heather Lewis of Animal Arts in Boulder, Colorado, which has been designing animal hospitals since 1979, says there are many ways to make veterinary offices more pleasant for pets. Among them: — Paint walls in pastels and have staff wear pastel scrubs and lab coats. To an animal's eyes, a white lab coat is like a bright glowing beacon and can be scary. — Remove old fluorescent lights. Dogs and cats have better hearing than humans, and the buzz from those old fixtures can bother them. — Consider alternatives to lifting animals up on to high exam tables with cold, slippery metal surfaces. Some clinics, like Becker's, use yoga mats for animal exams. — For background music, choose classical. Becker and Lewis like collections called "Through a Dog's Ear" and "Through a Cat's Ear." A fear-free vet might also use sedatives or pheromones—chemicals secreted by animals that serve as stimulants for many things, including mating—rather than muzzles or restraints to keep animals calm during treatment, Becker said. "Twenty-five to 30 percent of pets need sedation," Becker said. Becker introduced veterinarians to the fear-free initiative at the North American Veterinary Community convention last year. He's presenting version 2.0 at the 2016 conference beginning Saturday in Florida. Becker, chief veterinary correspondent for the American Humane Association, has written 22 books and is doing the 23rd on the fear-free initiative. One fear-free center is the Bigger Road Veterinary Center in Springboro, Ohio. "We designed this clinic to look like you were going for walks in the park," said Dr. John Talmadge. "Support beams look like maple trees. I don't know if we're fooling any pets but the exam rooms look like cottages and it looks like blue sky on the ceiling. It has a very inviting feel." He also expanded from 2,000 square feet to 10,000 square feet so he'd have room for better senior care and pain management. And for owners making end-of-life decisions for their pets, the clinic offers a private area. "There is nothing more important than making that last treatment dignified and calming," Talmadge said. Becker says the fear-free initiative is important because stress and anxiety cause so many problems for pets, both physical and mental. "Once pets know fear and anxiety and stress, you can't undo it," he said, adding, "You can see it. You can smell it because dogs are stained with their own saliva from licking themselves. You can hear it and feel it." Stress and fear can lead animals to hide the symptoms that prompted the vet visit, and may even alter their test results, said Richard A. LeCouteur, a veterinarian with a specialty in neurology and a professor emeritus at the University of California at Davis' School of Veterinary Medicine. Talmadge says the fear-free approach is proving popular. "We have more than doubled our business through that clinic since opening (in April) and are well ahead of where we thought we would be," Talmadge said. Explore further: Watch pets around wildlife as attacks rise in summer


Yang Y.J.,Veterinary Center | Cho G.J.,Kyungpook National University
Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advances | Year: 2015

The study population comprised 725 Thoroughbred racehorses with fractures over a 5 year period from 2007 through 2011 at the Korea Racing Authority's Seoul racecourse. There were 371 racing-related fractures in horses, accounting for the liighest proportion of 51.2% of the fractures, followed by training-related (33.4%) and management-related (14.1 %) fractures and fractures defined by pre-qualification inspection factors (1.4%). Fatal injury by racing-related fractures had the highest proportion at 32.8% of all the fractures in the study horses. The proportion of leg fractures was as high as 96.6%; this can be explained by considering the skeletal function of horses and the burden of supporting the body weight. In terms of occurrence by age, among factors for racing-induced fractures in horses, fracture occurrence rate in horses of 3-5 years of age exceeded the average rate of 0.60%. In the analysis of fracture occurrence by sex, geldings were the most frequently affected followed by male and then female horses. In the analysis of factors affecting racing-related fractures, fracture occurrence was considerably high in racehorses in which the burdened weight exceeded the average value. For burdened weight over 54 kg, there was a fracture in 219 of the 371 horses with racing-related fractures and this proportion was relatively high at 59%. When the track surface was muddy or sloppy, the fracture occurrence rate was higher than that during fast, good or humid conditions. © Medwell Journals, 2015.


Yang Y.J.,Veterinary Center | Choand Y.J.,Kyungpook National University | Cho G.J.,Kyungpook National University
Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advances | Year: 2015

A 5 year old male, Thoroughbred horse with the left Superficial Digital Flexor Tendon (SDFT) injury was presented to veterinary center, Korea Racing Authority. The horse had been previously treated with rest, pharmacological and non-phamiacological (rehabilitation protocols) therapies without improvement. In initial physical examination, left SDFT was diagnosed with edema or swelling including lameness grade 2 and pain by an ultrasound system and veterinarian Horse treated with autologous platelet-rich plasma into core lesion 3 times. After a 6 month follow-up, the horse has shown normal condition the left SDFT injury without lameness and pain. © Medwell Journals, 2015.


Hoffmann G.,Leibniz Institute for Agricultural Engineering | Bentke A.,Humboldt University of Berlin | Rose-Meierhofer S.,Leibniz Institute for Agricultural Engineering | Berg W.,Leibniz Institute for Agricultural Engineering | And 2 more authors.
Animal | Year: 2012

Horses are often stabled in individual boxes, a method that does not meet their natural needs and may cause psychical and musculoskeletal diseases. This problem is particularly evident in Iceland, where horses often spend the long winter periods in cramped boxes. The aim of this study was to analyze the suitability of a group housing system in Iceland, but the results are also applicable to horses of other regions. Eight Icelandic horses were observed in an active stable system, and their behavior and time budget were recorded. Movement and lying behavior were studied with ALT (Activity, Lying, Temperature detection) pedometers. The effect of an automatic concentrate feeding station (CFS) on the horses behavior was examined. In the first period of investigation, the horses were fed concentrates manually, and in the second period, they were fed with the CFS. Additional behavioral observations and a determination of social hierarchy occurred directly or by video surveillance. The physical condition of the horses was recorded by body weight (BW) measurement and body condition scoring (BCS). The results showed a significant increase between the first and second trial periods in both the activity (P < 0.001) and the lying time (P = 0.003) of the horses with use of the CFS. However, there was no significant change in BW during the first period without the CFS (P = 0.884) or during the second period with the CFS (P = 0.540). The BCS of the horses was constant at a very good level during both trial periods, and the horses showed a low level of aggression, a firm social hierarchy and behavioral synchronization. This study concludes that group housing according to the active stable principle is a welfare-friendly option for keeping horses and is a suitable alternative to conventional individual boxes. © 2012 The Animal Consortium.


Baneth G.,Hebrew University | Nachum-Biala Y.,Hebrew University | Shabat Simon M.,Tel Aviv University | Brenner O.,Weizmann Institute of Science | And 3 more authors.
Parasites and Vectors | Year: 2016

Background: Leishmania major is a main cause of cutaneous leishmaniasis in humans in an area that stretches from India through Central Asia, the Middle East, to North and West Africa. In Israel, it is a common infection of humans with rodents as the reservoir hosts and Phlebotomus papatasi as its sand fly vector. Findings: A 6 months old spayed female mixed breed dog was referred to the Hebrew University Veterinary Teaching Hospital with a large ulcerative dermal lesion on the muzzle, and lesions in the foot pads and left hind leg. Histopathology of a skin biopsy found chronic lymphohistiocytic dermatitis with the presence of Leishmania spp. amastigotes in the muzzle. Physical examination indicated that the dog was overall in a good clinical condition and the main findings were the skin lesions and enlarged prescapular lymph nodes. Complete blood count and serum biochemistry profile were within reference ranges. Serology by ELISA was positive for Leishmania spp. and PCR of the prescapular lymph node was positive by an ITS1 region PCR-high resolution melt analysis. However, the melt curve and subsequent DNA sequencing indicated that infection was caused by L. major and not L. infantum, which is the main causative agent of canine leishmaniosis in the Mediterranean region. DNA was extracted from the paraffin embedded muzzle biopsy and PCR with sequencing also indicated L. major. The dog's young age and the absence of hyperglobulinemia and anemia were not typical of L. infantum infection. The dog was treated with allopurinol and the skin lesions improved and later disappeared when the dog was re-evaluated. Conclusions: This is the first molecularly-confirmed case of L. major infection in a dog. Two previous reports of L. major in dogs originated from Saudi-Arabia and Egypt in 1985 and 1987 were confirmed by enzymatic biochemical techniques. Serology for L. infantum was positive probably due to the well documented serological cross-reactivity between Leishmania spp. Although dogs and wild carnivores are not considered main reservoirs for L. major, the possibility of clinical canine disease and their potential as secondary hosts should be investigated in areas endemic for human L. major infection. © 2016 Baneth et al.


PubMed | Veterinary Center, Weizmann Institute of Science, Tel Aviv University and Hebrew University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Parasites & vectors | Year: 2016

Leishmania major is a main cause of cutaneous leishmaniasis in humans in an area that stretches from India through Central Asia, the Middle East, to North and West Africa. In Israel, it is a common infection of humans with rodents as the reservoir hosts and Phlebotomus papatasi as its sand fly vector.A 6months old spayed female mixed breed dog was referred to the Hebrew University Veterinary Teaching Hospital with a large ulcerative dermal lesion on the muzzle, and lesions in the foot pads and left hind leg. Histopathology of a skin biopsy found chronic lymphohistiocytic dermatitis with the presence of Leishmania spp. amastigotes in the muzzle. Physical examination indicated that the dog was overall in a good clinical condition and the main findings were the skin lesions and enlarged prescapular lymph nodes. Complete blood count and serum biochemistry profile were within reference ranges. Serology by ELISA was positive for Leishmania spp. and PCR of the prescapular lymph node was positive by an ITS1 region PCR-high resolution melt analysis. However, the melt curve and subsequent DNA sequencing indicated that infection was caused by L. major and not L. infantum, which is the main causative agent of canine leishmaniosis in the Mediterranean region. DNA was extracted from the paraffin embedded muzzle biopsy and PCR with sequencing also indicated L. major. The dogs young age and the absence of hyperglobulinemia and anemia were not typical of L. infantum infection. The dog was treated with allopurinol and the skin lesions improved and later disappeared when the dog was re-evaluated.This is the first molecularly-confirmed case of L. major infection in a dog. Two previous reports of L. major in dogs originated from Saudi-Arabia and Egypt in 1985 and 1987 were confirmed by enzymatic biochemical techniques. Serology for L. infantum was positive probably due to the well documented serological cross-reactivity between Leishmania spp. Although dogs and wild carnivores are not considered main reservoirs for L. major, the possibility of clinical canine disease and their potential as secondary hosts should be investigated in areas endemic for human L. major infection.


PubMed | Center Veterinaire Laval, University of Montréal and Veterinary Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: The Journal of small animal practice | Year: 2016

To evaluate and compare nasal mucosal contact, septal deviation and caudal aberrant nasal turbinates in brachycephalic and normocephalic dogs using computed tomography.Dogs without nasal disease and having undergone computed tomography scan of the head (plica alaris to the cribiform plate) were retrospectively selected and divided into brachycephalic and normocephalic groups. Eighteen brachycephalic and 32 normocephalic dogs were included. Anatomic criteria were used to locate predetermined pairs of intranasal structures and nasal mucosal contact was described as present or absent for each site. Septal deviations were identified and measured using angle of septal deviation. Caudal aberrant nasal turbinates were identified and categorised when present.Prevalence of nasal mucosal contact was significantly higher in brachycephalic dogs. No significant difference was seen in prevalence or in angle of septal deviation between groups. Prevalence of caudal aberrant nasal turbinates was significantly higher in brachycephalic dogs.Nasal mucosal contact and caudal aberrant nasal turbinates were significantly more prevalent in brachycephalic dogs than in normocephalic dogs in our study. Computed tomography can be a valuable aid in obtaining data on nasal mucosal contact, caudal aberrant nasal turbinates and septal deviations. Combination of computed tomography with endoscopy and functional airway testing would be useful to further evaluate the correlation between intranasal features and symptoms of brachycephalic airway syndrome.


PubMed | Veterinary Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Research in veterinary science | Year: 2013

Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) is a promising biomarker in humans and dogs with kidney disease. This protein is expressed by many cells including renal tubular cells and neutrophils. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of urinary tract infection (UTI) on urinary NGAL (uNGAL) concentration in dogs. Urine culture and measurement of uNGAL level were performed in 80 non-azotemic dogs suspected of UTI and 19 healthy dogs. Dogs were divided in three groups: 19 healthy dogs, 25 dogs with positive culture and 55 dogs suspected of UTI but with negative culture. uNGAL and uNGAL/Creatinine was significantly higher (P < 0.0001) in dogs with UTI (14.22 ng/mL;19.74 g/g) compared to Healthy (0.24 ng/mL;0.11 g/g) and Negative (1.13 ng/mL;1.28 g/g) dogs. A uNGAL value <3.38 ng/mL had a negative predictive value for UTI of 87%. Presence of UTI has to be considered when uNGAL is used to detect kidney disease.


WAYNE, Pa., Nov. 06, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Pets need to stay up to date on important vaccinations to retain additional protection against serious diseases, reports Radnor Veterinary Center. Ensure the health of a beloved pet with important vaccinations and immunization against rabies, distemper and bordetella for dogs and feline viral rhinotracheitis in cats. It is necessary to take pets in for necessary vaccinations and important to discuss other preventative shots for outdoor exposure and boarding. Rabies vaccinations are legally required for dogs and cats. In addition, pet owners need to take preventative measures to ensure their pet’s wellbeing and protect them from potentially deadly pet diseases and bacterial infections. A vaccination serves as an immunity booster to safeguard a pet’s health. Trace amounts of a virus are introduced to encourage the immune system to build up immunity against common and serious animal diseases. There are a number of core vaccinations required for dogs. The law requires rabies vaccines, but other core vaccinations dogs need for boarding or daycare include distemper, parvovirus and bordetella. Cats should also receive important core vaccinations to avoid contracting feline-specific respiratory illness and immune system infections. Core cat vaccinations include rabies, feline viral rhinotracheitis, feline calcivirus and feline panleukopenia. Pets may be exposed to other risks, especially if they spend time outdoors. Other preventative shots may be recommended. Some exotic pets may also face potential risks and may benefit from preventative vaccinations. Birds need to undergo special testing prior to boarding. It is best to speak with a trusted veterinarian to determine potential risk and exposure to additional diseases or infections. “All responsible pet owners need to be aware of the necessary and suggested vaccinations that can maintain the health of a beloved pet,” said Leonard Donato, VMD and owner. “As an experienced vet, I educate pet owners on the types of vaccinations that a pet requires depending on activity, age, law and exposure. Many deadly animal diseases and infections can be prevented with necessary core vaccinations and updates. Vaccination maintains the health and happiness of companion animals and reduces the need for potentially expensive veterinary treatment of serious diseases.” Leonard Donato, VMD and owner at Radnor Veterinary Hospital, serves pets and their owners in Wayne, Bala Cynwyd, Plymouth Meeting and Paoli. Their staff offers the highest level of veterinary care to area pets and offers preventative, medical and surgical veterinary services. Veterinarians at Radnor Veterinary Hospital offer compassionate services including comprehensive wellness exams, vaccinations, dental care, laser therapy, digital radiography, dental radiography, orthopedic and endoscopic surgery, emergency care, dog licensing and prescription diets. An in-house laboratory, daycare and boarding assist pet owners and their pets. Veterinary services are available six days a week. Call (610) 687-1550 to learn more about vaccinations, schedule an appointment for vaccination or visit http://radnorvet.com/.


News Article | November 2, 2016
Site: www.prlog.org

All Creatures Veterinary Center in Carrollton, Texas will begins its annual Thanksgiving Food Exchange food drive.

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