Veterinary Cardiorespiratory Center

Kenilworth, United Kingdom

Veterinary Cardiorespiratory Center

Kenilworth, United Kingdom
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Palermo V.,Hospital for Small Animals | Stafford Johnson M.J.,Veterinary Cardiorespiratory Center | Sala E.,Busto Arsizio Hospital | Martin M.W.S.,Veterinary Cardiorespiratory Center
Journal of Veterinary Cardiology | Year: 2011

Objectives: To retrospectively compare and contrast the clinical presentation, diagnostic findings and survival in Boxer dogs with cardiomyopathy, with or without left ventricular (LV) systolic failure. Animals, materials and methods: Medical records of Boxers referred between 1993 and 2008 in which a diagnosis of ventricular arrhythmias and/or cardiomyopathy was made, were reviewed. Dogs were divided into two groups according to their left ventricular (LV) systolic diameter, group A normal (20 dogs) or group B dilated (59 dogs). Results: Dogs in group A had a better outcome than dogs in group B (median survival time of 124 and 17 weeks respectively, p < 0.001). In group B, dogs with a history of collapse had a worse outcome (median survival time of 10 weeks) compared with dogs not showing collapse (median survival time 24 weeks) (p = 0.031). Conclusions: The majority of dogs, in this UK study, presented with the myocardial dysfunction form of the disease, with LV dilation and congestive heart failure signs. The prognosis was worse in dogs with LV dilation compared to dogs with a normal LV and ventricular arrhythmias. In the Boxers with LV dilation, dogs with collapse had a worse prognosis than those without. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Pedro B.M.,Av. Fortunato Meneres 31 | Alves J.V.,Rua Quinta das Chas 148 | Cripps P.J.,University of Liverpool | Stafford Johnson M.J.,Veterinary Cardiorespiratory Center | Martin M.W.S.,Veterinary Cardiorespiratory Center
Journal of Veterinary Cardiology | Year: 2011

Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the prognostic value of QRS duration in dogs with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) by studying its relationship with survival time. Methods: The medical records of dogs diagnosed with DCM were retrospectively searched for good quality ECG tracings. The QRS duration was measured from the ECG tracing and two different models were used: binary variable (dogs were divided into 2 groups based on a QRS duration of <60 ms or ≥60 ms) and continuous variable. The survival times were analysed by the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox's proportional hazard model. Results: 266 dogs met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. A QRS duration ≥60 ms was associated with a reduced survival time compared to those with a QRS duration <60 ms (Hazard Ratio of 1.34, 95% CI 1.05-1.71, P = 0.02). When considered as a continuous variable the Hazard Ratio was 1.015 for each increase in QRS duration of 1 ms (95% CI 1.006-1.024, p = 0.001).Dogs with a QRS duration < 60 ms had a median survival time (IQ range) of 25 weeks (97-65) and dogs with a QRS duration ≥60 ms had a median survival time (IQ range) of 13 weeks (3-34). Conclusion: The measurement of QRS duration is relatively simple to perform from a surface ECG recording. A duration ≥60 ms is associated with shorter survival times in dogs with DCM, which may provide practitioners with additional prognostic information. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Martin M.W.S.,Veterinary Cardiorespiratory Center | Stafford Johnson M.J.,Veterinary Cardiorespiratory Center | Strehlau G.,Novartis | King J.N.,Novartis
Journal of Small Animal Practice | Year: 2010

Objective: To review the association between clinical signs and diagnostic findings and the survival time of dogs with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), and any influence of treatment prescribed. Methods: A retrospective observational study of 367 dogs with DCM. Survival times until death or euthanasia for cardiac reasons were analysed using the Kaplan-Meier method plus univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models. Two-tailed P values less than 0·05 were considered statistically significant. Results: In the multivariate model, left ventricular diameter (LVDs)-index (P=0·0067), presence of pulmonary oedema on radio-graphy (P=0·043), presence of ventricular premature complexes (VPCs) (P=0·0012), higher plasma creatinine (P=0·0002), lower plasma protein (P=0·029) and great Dane breed (P=0·0003) were negatively associated with survival. Most dogs were treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (93%) or furosemide (86%), and many received digoxin (50%) and/or pimobendan (30%). Thirteen dogs were lost to follow-up. No conclusions could be made in this study on the association between use of drugs and survival. Clinical Significance: The LVDs-index was the single best variable for assessing the prognosis in this group of dogs with DCM. Other variables that were negatively associated with survival were presence of pulmonary oedema on radiography, presence of VPCs, higher plasma creatinine, lower plasma protein and great Dane breed. © 2010 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.


Lopez-Alvarez J.,University of Liverpool | Lopez-Alvarez J.,Lane College | Dukes-Mcewan J.,University of Liverpool | Martin M.W.S.,Veterinary Cardiorespiratory Center | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Veterinary Cardiology | Year: 2011

A 12-week-old male Golden Retriever was presented with signs of right-sided congestive heart failure and a grade V/VI left craniosternal systolic murmur. Echocardiography identified a double-chambered right ventricle and dilated coronary sinus (CS) running into an inter-atrial chamber. This was confirmed to be an imperforate cor triatriatum dexter (CTD) by selective angiographic studies. To the authors' knowledge this is the first case reported of imperforate CTD successfully treated by membranostomy and balloon dilation. Cardiac MRI confirmed the echocardiographic and angiographic findings and provided a more precise understanding of the venous abnormalities. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Veterinary Cardiorespiratory Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: The Journal of small animal practice | Year: 2010

To review the association between clinical signs and diagnostic findings and the survival time of dogs with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), and any influence of treatment prescribed.A retrospective observational study of 367 dogs with DCM. Survival times until death or euthanasia for cardiac reasons were analysed using the Kaplan-Meier method plus univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models. Two-tailed P values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant.In the multivariate model, left ventricular diameter (LVDs)-index (P=0.0067), presence of pulmonary oedema on radiography (P=0.043), presence of ventricular premature complexes (VPCs) (P=0.0012), higher plasma creatinine (P=0.0002), lower plasma protein (P=0.029) and great Dane breed (P=0.0003) were negatively associated with survival. Most dogs were treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (93%) or furosemide (86%), and many received digoxin (50%) and/or pimobendan (30%). Thirteen dogs were lost to follow-up. No conclusions could be made in this study on the association between use of drugs and survival.The LVDs-index was the single best variable for assessing the prognosis in this group of dogs with DCM. Other variables that were negatively associated with survival were presence of pulmonary oedema on radiography, presence of VPCs, higher plasma creatinine, lower plasma protein and great Dane breed.

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