Nashville, TN, United States
Nashville, TN, United States

Time filter

Source Type

News Article | February 27, 2017
Site: www.futurity.org

Tiny droplets of saliva can carry bacteria from the mouth to the lungs, a new study shows. That means bacteria are able to avoid the epiglottis, the movable tissue barrier that keeps most saliva from getting into the lower respiratory tract. By studying the DNA of these bacteria in the lungs of healthy volunteers, researchers confirmed that the population of microbes in the lungs closely resembles the population found in the mouth. And by studying the microbes’ distribution within the airways, the researchers could determine their most likely entry route. They found that many of the immigrant microbes make their home near the main carina, the spot at the end of the trachea where the airway branches off to the left and right lungs. This spot in the lungs is a “landing pad” where aspirated saliva—because of gravity and our upright posture—is likely to collide with the airway. But some bacteria manage to make it all the way to the deepest reaches of the pulmonary system and reside in the tiny air sacs called alveoli. Wherever the bacteria land, they join a community made up mostly of other recent immigrants. Few microbes are thought to be long-term residents of healthy lungs. Unlike the gut, healthy lungs are an inhospitable environment for bacteria, with little nutrition and constant surveillance by the immune system. “This is the most comprehensive topographic survey of the healthy lung microbiome to date. It adds to the evidence that healthy lungs are like an island whose population is determined by the balance of immigration and elimination of species: who moves in and who moves out,” says Robert P. Dickson, assistant professor of internal medicine at the University of Michigan. “The microbiome of the lung plays by a different ecologic rulebook than the gut microbiome, and this study helps clarify what those rules are.” Inspired by classic models of ecology, researchers propose an “adapted island model” of the lung microbiome, in which the competing pressures of microbial immigration and elimination determine the lung’s ecosystem. The new paper, published in the journal mBio, doesn’t just describe the lung microbiome ecosystem; it also shows that scientists who want to study it in the future can feel confident using the standard techniques doctors already use to look for lung disease. Researchers conducted the study with eight healthy volunteers who underwent bronchoscopy at VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System. The team obtained the lung bacteria using two techniques to sample nine separate sites in the lungs of each volunteer. One technique, called protected specimen brushing, used a special catheter that keeps bacteria from the mouth and throat from contaminating the samples taken in the airways. Suspicion of such contamination has kept some researchers from fully accepting the results of previous lung microbiome research. So to test for this contamination, the researchers took one sample on a brush held in the middle of the airway and the rest using brushes that they gently touched to the airway wall. The researchers got other samples through bronchoalveolar lavage, in which they squirt a small amount of fluid into the deepest part of the lung and suction it back into the bronchoscope, bringing microbes along with it. They then analyzed the bacterial DNA found in all these samples. “We found no evidence of upper respiratory tract bacteria in these contamination control specimens,” says Dickson. “This reassured us that the rest of our samples truly reflected lung bacteria and not just contamination from the procedure” brought in by the bronchoscope as it passed through the throat. Taken together, the results suggest bronchoscope-based techniques can be used to study the lung microbiome—in sickness and in health. “The lungs are our largest interface with the outside environment, with 70 square meters of surface area,” says Dickson. “That’s 30 times the size of the skin and twice the size of the gastrointestinal tract. And this study confirms that they’re under constant bombardment by diverse communities of bacteria.” The researchers emphasize that these volunteers were healthy and had no symptoms that suggested pneumonia or other respiratory disease. “These volunteers were as healthy as you or me,” Dickson says. “We are probably all aspirating small amounts of bacteria constantly, and so long as our immune system is intact, they rarely make us sick.” Microaspiration in healthy people has been observed for nearly a century in studies using medical imaging techniques. “We’ve known about the existence of microaspiration for decades,” says Dickson. “But this is the first time we’ve been able to find its ecologic fingerprint.” Next steps in the research will include what happens in people who have problems with the elimination part of this equation. Inability to cough irritants out of the lung, or to carry them out through the sweeping action of hairlike cilia on lung cell surfaces, could lead to more microbes staying longer in the lungs than normal. And that could lead to a higher risk of lung infection. Such research could lead to better understanding of the lung microbiome’s importance in conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cystic fibrosis, and the types of lung failure seen in intensive care units. “If healthy lungs are like Antarctica—where conditions aren’t good for reproduction— then diseased lungs are more like a tropical island, where lower rates of elimination and altered environmental conditions permit the persistence and reproduction of certain bacteria,” he says. Dickson also thinks it would be interesting to study how the lung microbiome changes when a person has a viral infection that causes the upper respiratory tract to produce more nasal secretions. “I certainly look at my kids with their constantly runny noses and wonder if their lung microbiome looks more ‘nasal’ than ‘oral.'” And as researchers begin to uncover the impact of common medications such as antibiotics and proton pump inhibitors on the microbiome in the digestive system, he notes that it’s not unreasonable to think that these drugs also affect the lung microbiome. He and colleagues have already found evidence that the lungs are filled with gut microbes in critically ill patients. The research was sponsored by the National Institutes of Health and the Department of Veterans Affairs, as well as the Michigan Institute for Clinical & Health Research, the U-M Medical School’s Host Microbiome Initiative, and the Michigan Center for Integrative Research in Critical Care.


HERNDON, Va., Feb. 17, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- ManTech International Corporation (Nasdaq:MANT) will provide mission-critical clinical information technology specialty support to the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Office of Information & Technology (OI&T), Enterprise Program Management Office (EPMO). ManTech will deliver troubleshooting, systems engineering, software development, and operational support to the VA’s telemedicine and VistA Imaging systems as a subcontractor to Liberty IT Solutions, LLC, a leading Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Small Business IT services provider to the Federal Government, helping enable systems that directly support veterans’ healthcare. The base subcontract with options has a total value to ManTech of $20 million. “ManTech is proud to continue its support for our nation’s veterans through the provision of critical IT services to the Department of Veterans Affairs and its clinical IT systems. Through the HPS contract and in partnership with Liberty IT and the VA, ManTech will contribute to top-quality and accessible medical care for veterans,” said Daniel J. Keefe, president and chief operating officer of ManTech’s Mission Solutions & Services Group and a retired Army brigadier general. ManTech provides innovative technologies and solutions for mission-critical national security programs for the Intelligence Community; the Departments of Defense, State, Homeland Security, Health and Human Services, Veterans Affairs and Justice, including the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI); the space community; and other U.S. government customers. We support important national missions by providing services to approximately 50 federal government agencies under approximately 900 current contracts. ManTech's expertise includes cybersecurity; software and systems development; enterprise information technology; multi-discipline intelligence; program protection and mission assurance; systems engineering; test and evaluation (T&E); command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (C4ISR); training; supply chain management and logistics; and management consulting. Additional information on ManTech can be found at www.mantech.com. Statements and assumptions made in this press release, which do not address historical facts, constitute "forward-looking" statements that ManTech believes to be within the definition in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 and involve risks and uncertainties, many of which are outside of our control. These forward-looking statements are inherently subject to risks and uncertainties, and actual results and outcomes may differ materially from the results and outcomes we anticipate. Factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from the results we anticipate include, but are not limited to, the following: failure to obtain option awards, task orders, or funding under contracts; failure to realize the full amount of our backlog, or adverse changes in the timing of receipt of revenues under contracts included in backlog; or renegotiation, modification, or termination of our contracts, or failure to perform in conformity with contract terms or our expectations. These and other risk factors are more fully discussed in the section entitled "Risk Factors" in ManTech's Annual Report on Form 10-K, and, from time to time, in ManTech's other filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission.


HERNDON, Va., Feb. 17, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- ManTech International Corporation (Nasdaq:MANT) will provide mission-critical clinical information technology specialty support to the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Office of Information & Technology (OI&T), Enterprise Program Management Office (EPMO). ManTech will deliver troubleshooting, systems engineering, software development, and operational support to the VA’s telemedicine and VistA Imaging systems as a subcontractor to Liberty IT Solutions, LLC, a leading Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Small Business IT services provider to the Federal Government, helping enable systems that directly support veterans’ healthcare. The base subcontract with options has a total value to ManTech of $20 million. “ManTech is proud to continue its support for our nation’s veterans through the provision of critical IT services to the Department of Veterans Affairs and its clinical IT systems. Through the HPS contract and in partnership with Liberty IT and the VA, ManTech will contribute to top-quality and accessible medical care for veterans,” said Daniel J. Keefe, president and chief operating officer of ManTech’s Mission Solutions & Services Group and a retired Army brigadier general. ManTech provides innovative technologies and solutions for mission-critical national security programs for the Intelligence Community; the Departments of Defense, State, Homeland Security, Health and Human Services, Veterans Affairs and Justice, including the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI); the space community; and other U.S. government customers. We support important national missions by providing services to approximately 50 federal government agencies under approximately 900 current contracts. ManTech's expertise includes cybersecurity; software and systems development; enterprise information technology; multi-discipline intelligence; program protection and mission assurance; systems engineering; test and evaluation (T&E); command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (C4ISR); training; supply chain management and logistics; and management consulting. Additional information on ManTech can be found at www.mantech.com. Statements and assumptions made in this press release, which do not address historical facts, constitute "forward-looking" statements that ManTech believes to be within the definition in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 and involve risks and uncertainties, many of which are outside of our control. These forward-looking statements are inherently subject to risks and uncertainties, and actual results and outcomes may differ materially from the results and outcomes we anticipate. Factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from the results we anticipate include, but are not limited to, the following: failure to obtain option awards, task orders, or funding under contracts; failure to realize the full amount of our backlog, or adverse changes in the timing of receipt of revenues under contracts included in backlog; or renegotiation, modification, or termination of our contracts, or failure to perform in conformity with contract terms or our expectations. These and other risk factors are more fully discussed in the section entitled "Risk Factors" in ManTech's Annual Report on Form 10-K, and, from time to time, in ManTech's other filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission.


HERNDON, Va., Feb. 17, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- ManTech International Corporation (Nasdaq:MANT) will provide mission-critical clinical information technology specialty support to the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Office of Information & Technology (OI&T), Enterprise Program Management Office (EPMO). ManTech will deliver troubleshooting, systems engineering, software development, and operational support to the VA’s telemedicine and VistA Imaging systems as a subcontractor to Liberty IT Solutions, LLC, a leading Service-Disabled Veteran-Owned Small Business IT services provider to the Federal Government, helping enable systems that directly support veterans’ healthcare. The base subcontract with options has a total value to ManTech of $20 million. “ManTech is proud to continue its support for our nation’s veterans through the provision of critical IT services to the Department of Veterans Affairs and its clinical IT systems. Through the HPS contract and in partnership with Liberty IT and the VA, ManTech will contribute to top-quality and accessible medical care for veterans,” said Daniel J. Keefe, president and chief operating officer of ManTech’s Mission Solutions & Services Group and a retired Army brigadier general. ManTech provides innovative technologies and solutions for mission-critical national security programs for the Intelligence Community; the Departments of Defense, State, Homeland Security, Health and Human Services, Veterans Affairs and Justice, including the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI); the space community; and other U.S. government customers. We support important national missions by providing services to approximately 50 federal government agencies under approximately 900 current contracts. ManTech's expertise includes cybersecurity; software and systems development; enterprise information technology; multi-discipline intelligence; program protection and mission assurance; systems engineering; test and evaluation (T&E); command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (C4ISR); training; supply chain management and logistics; and management consulting. Additional information on ManTech can be found at www.mantech.com. Statements and assumptions made in this press release, which do not address historical facts, constitute "forward-looking" statements that ManTech believes to be within the definition in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 and involve risks and uncertainties, many of which are outside of our control. These forward-looking statements are inherently subject to risks and uncertainties, and actual results and outcomes may differ materially from the results and outcomes we anticipate. Factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from the results we anticipate include, but are not limited to, the following: failure to obtain option awards, task orders, or funding under contracts; failure to realize the full amount of our backlog, or adverse changes in the timing of receipt of revenues under contracts included in backlog; or renegotiation, modification, or termination of our contracts, or failure to perform in conformity with contract terms or our expectations. These and other risk factors are more fully discussed in the section entitled "Risk Factors" in ManTech's Annual Report on Form 10-K, and, from time to time, in ManTech's other filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission.


Patent
President And Fellows Of Harvard College and Veterans Affairs | Date: 2014-10-07

A computer implemented method and computer system for reducing errors associated with a situated interaction performed by at least two agents of a sociotechnical team and for augmenting situation awareness of the at least two agents. Also, a non-transitory computer-readable storage medium used to store instructions relating to the computer method and the computer system. The situated interaction can be surgery and the at least two agents can be members of a surgical team.


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

The human heart beats more than 2.5 billion times in an average lifetime. Now scientists at Vanderbilt University have created a three-dimensional organ-on-a-chip that can mimic the heart's amazing biomechanical properties. "We created the I-Wire Heart-on-a-Chip so that we can understand why cardiac cells behave the way they do by asking the cells questions, instead of just watching them," said Gordon A. Cain University Professor John Wikswo, who heads up the project. "We believe it could prove invaluable in studying cardiac diseases, drug screening and drug development, and, in the future, in personalized medicine by identifying the cells taken from patients that can be used to patch damaged hearts effectively." The device and the results of initial experiments demonstrating that it faithfully reproduces the response of cardiac cells to two different drugs that affect heart function in humans are described in an article published last month in the journal Acta Biomaterialia. A companion article in the same issue presents a biomechanical analysis of the I-Wire platform that can be used for characterizing biomaterials for cardiac regenerative medicine. The unique aspect of the new device, which represents about two millionths of a human heart, is that it controls the mechanical force applied to cardiac cells. This allows the researchers to reproduce the mechanical conditions of the living heart, which is continually stretching and contracting, in addition to its electrical and biochemical environment. "Heart tissue, along with muscle, skeletal and vascular tissue, represents a special class of mechanically active biomaterials," said Wikswo. "Mechanical activity is an intrinsic property of these tissues so you can't fully understand how they function and how they fail without taking this factor into account." "Currently, we don't have many models for studying how the heart responds to stress. Without them, it is very difficult to develop new drugs that specifically address what goes wrong in these conditions," commented Charles Hong, associate professor of cardiovascular medicine at Vanderbilt's School of Medicine, who didn't participate in the research but is familiar with it. "This provides us with a really amazing model for studying how hearts fail." The I-Wire device consists of a thin thread of human cardiac cells 0.014 inches thick (about the size of 20-pound monofilament fishing line) stretched between two perpendicular wire anchors. The amount of tension on the fiber can be varied by moving the anchors in and out, and the tension is measured with a flexible probe that pushes against the side of the fiber. The fiber is supported by wires and a frame in an optically clear well that is filled with liquid medium like that which surrounds cardiac cells in the body. The apparatus is mounted on the stage of a powerful optical microscope that records the fiber's physical changes. The microscope also acts as a spectroscope that can provide information about the chemical changes taking place in the fiber. A floating microelectrode also measures the cells' electrical activity. According to the researchers, the I-Wire system can be used to characterize how cardiac cells respond to electrical stimulation and mechanical loads and can be implemented at low cost, small size and low fluid volumes, which make it suitable for screening drugs and toxins. Because of its potential applications, Vanderbilt University has patented the device. Unlike other heart-on-a-chip designs, I-Wire allows the researchers to grow cardiac cells under controlled, time-varying tension similar to what they experience in living hearts. As a consequence, the heart cells in the fiber align themselves in alternating dark and light bands, called sarcomeres, which are characteristic of human muscle tissue. The cardiac cells in most other heart-on-a-chip designs do not exhibit this natural organization. In addition, the researchers have determined that their heart-on-a-chip obeys the Frank-Starling law of the heart. The law, which was discovered by two physiologists in 1918, describes the relationship between the volume of blood filling the heart and the force with which cardiac cells contract. The I-Wire is one of the first heart-on-a-chip devices to do so. To demonstrate the I-Wire's value in determining the effects that different drugs have on the heart, the scientists tested its response with two drugs known to affect heart function in humans: isoproterenol and blebbistatin. Isoproterenol is a medication used to treat bradycardia (slow heart rate) and heart block (obstruction of the heart's natural pacemaker). Blebbistatin inhibits contractions in all types of muscle tissue, including the heart. According to Veniamin Sidorov, the research assistant professor at the Vanderbilt Institute for Integrative Biosystems Research and Education (VIIBRE) who led its development, the device faithfully reproduces the response of cardiac cells in a living heart. "Cardiac tissue has two basic elements: an active, contractile element and a passive, elastic element," said Sidorov. "By separating these two elements with blebbistatin, we successfully characterized the elasticity of the artificial tissue. By exposing it to isoproterenol, we tested its response to adrenergic stimulation, which is one of the main systems responsible for regulation of heart contractions. We found that the relationship between these two elements in the cardiac fiber is consistent with that seen in natural tissue. This confirms that our heart-on-a-chip model provides us with a new way to study the elastic response of cardiac muscle, which is extremely complicated and is implicated in heart failure, hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy and cardiomyopathy." Other members of the VIIBRE research team are Professor of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology Jeffrey Davidson, former Assistant Professor of Medicine Chee Lim (now at NIH), Assistant Professor of Biostatistics Matthew Shotwell and Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering David Merryman, Senior R&D Engineer Philip Samson, postdoctoral fellow Tatiana Sidorova and doctoral student Alison Schroer. The I-Wire technology has been patented and is available for licensing. Interested parties should contact Ashok Choudhury or Masood Machingal at the Vanderbilt Center for Technology Transfer and Commercialization. The research was supported by National Institutes of Health grants 1R01118392-01, R01 HL118392, R01 HL095813 and 5R01-AR056138; National Science Foundation grants 1055384 and DGE-0909667; Defense Threat Reduction Agency grant CBMXCEL-XL1-2-001; American Heart Association grant 15PRE25710333; and by the Department of Veterans Affairs.


NEEDHAM, Mass.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The Object Management Group® (OMG®), an international, open membership, not-for-profit technology standards consortium, today announced it will hold the Business Process Modeling in Healthcare Workshop on March 20 from 8:45 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. at the Hyatt Regency Hotel in Reston, Virginia. The workshop is focused on establishing an approach to allow for workflows – specifically clinical workflows – to be shared among provider organizations allowing them to ingest, adapt, and evolve those processes to embrace emerging best clinical practice, and to perform continuous improvement. Exploring the specific and unique needs of the clinical health landscape, Workshop speakers will investigate usage of existing modeling languages (including BPMN™) to determine the viability, coverage, and gaps to meeting health industry needs. Keynote speaker Dr. Hammond will present “ The Tensions between Workflow, Status Quo, and Keeping up with Technology (and the Times).” He will focus on the changes being “forced” on the health system as a consequence of advances in technology, as well as the impacts of changing health best practices and the industry’s ability to adopt them. Registration costs $149 USD. Media admission is complimentary using the code TCVAP17. Recognized for his pioneering work in the HL7 standards community, Dr. Hammond’s academic and industry leadership experience includes roles as past President and Board member of the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA); President and Fellow of the American College of Medical Informatics; three terms as Chair of Health Level Seven; two terms as the Convenor of ISO Technical Committee 215, Working Group 2; and current Ambassador to Developing Countries and Chair of the Joint Initiative Council of ISO/CEN/HL7. The event also features Shane McNamee, M.D., US Department of Veterans Affairs, who will present “Interoperable Healthcare Workflows: Goals and Vision.” Currently, healthcare delivery is disconnected and inefficient. Dr. McNamee will discuss some of the challenges of disconnected and inefficient delivery, and set the stage for how OMG Business Process Modeling Notation™ (BPMN) standard offers potential to stabilize health care processes that support both patients and providers as organizations strive toward improved efficacy and high reliability. A foremost expert in BPM standards, Denis Gagné, CEO/CTO of Trisotech and Chair of the OMG BPMN Interchange Working Group, will explain how to leverage the OMG business process modeling standards—BPMN, Case Management Model and Notation™ and Decision Model Notation™—to improve business improvement, innovation and transformation, and how these can be used in tandem to meet the needs of the health vertical market segment. The remainder of the day will focus on breakout sessions, presenting working group activities to develop a pilot implementation and a Health BPM Modeling “Field Guide.” The sessions will brief attendees on what has been done since the December workshop, and present opportunities to directly contribute and evolve the work. Workshop attendees are invited to join the OMG Healthcare Committee Meeting on March 21 for an in-depth discussion about OMG’s healthcare standards work. Or they can participate in the Committee Meeting for two days from March 21-22. The one-day add-in option costs an additional $99 USD and the two-day add-in option costs an extra $198 USD. The Workshop is a special event of the OMG Technical Meeting from March 20-24, 2017 in Reston, Virginia. Attendees who register for the Technical Meeting week do not have to pay the additional fee to attend the Workshop. OMG Social Media Channels To learn about becoming an OMG member, click on http://www.omg.org or visit us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter or connect with us on LinkedIn. About OMG The Object Management Group® (OMG®) is an international, open membership, not-for-profit technology standards consortium with representation from government, industry and academia. OMG Task Forces develop enterprise integration standards for a wide range of technologies and an even wider range of industries. OMG's modeling standards enable powerful visual design, execution and maintenance of software and other processes. Visit http://www.omg.org for more information. Note to editors: For a listing of all OMG trademarks, visit http://www.omg.org/legal/tm_list.htm. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.


JERSEY CITY, N.J.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Datapipe, a leader in managed cloud services for the enterprise, today announced that the Federal Risk and Authorization Management Program (FedRAMP) Joint Authorization Board (JAB) has certified Datapipe Government Cloud (DGC) for 800-53 Revision 4 controls, further validating the offering as a secure choice for government agencies. Datapipe previously received FedRAMP Provisional Authority to Operate (P-ATO) in 2015 and is one of four Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) providers with this certification. A PaaS offering is defined by Gartner as services between the SaaS layer above it and the IaaS layer below. Datapipe’s PaaS offering provides operating and security services to support the virtual operating system and virtual network layer. FedRAMP standardizes security assessment and authorization and allows government agencies to improve efficiencies when it comes to choosing secure cloud products and services. The FedRAMP Revision 4 controls add increased emphasis on privacy over Revision 3 controls and include several additional security measures, including increased automation and improved effectiveness. The Revision 4 controls were added as part of a continuous effort to keep FedRAMP requirements in line with the security needs of government agencies. “We are proud to be one of just a few PaaS providers whose security measures meet FedRAMP Joint Authorization Board’s rigorous standards,” said Dan Tudahl, President and General Manager, Datapipe Government Solutions. “The latest certification from the JAB is indicative of our commitment to providing the most secure services to our clients in the government space who handle sensitive data in the cloud.” FedRAMP certification through the JAB requires continuous monitoring and annual reassessment to ensure security controls are being met. Providers that have received JAB approval are required to demonstrate rigorous continuous monitoring activities or risk loss of certification. For over a decade, Datapipe Government Solutions (DGS) has allowed clients flexibility in meeting security objectives through customization, data sovereignty and additional controls. Since the announcement of FedRAMP certification last year, DGS has added many additional enterprise-level tools that enhance client experience on top of FedRAMP requirements, including ScienceLogic EM7 monitoring system, IBM BigFix patch management system, Splunk log collection system and ServiceNow ticketing system. Datapipe has also delivered cloud solutions to more than half of the cabinet-level agencies and more than 30 states, including the U.S. Dept. of Veterans Affairs, U.S. Dept. of Justice and U.S. Dept. of Homeland Security. 11 unique agencies currently put their trust in this platform. For more information about DGC, visit Datapipe’s Government Solutions page. DGS, a wholly owned subsidiary of Datapipe, is a leading provider of secure cloud and managed hosting services with over 16 years of experience delivering enterprise applications in secure hosted or cloud environments. Over this time, DGS has established a high-reliability track record for consistently meeting the stringent security and availability requirements that our Federal Government customers demand. DGS is also a participant of the AWS Public Sector Partner Program, which recognizes APN partners that have solutions and experience serving government, education and non-profit customers around the world. A next generation MSP, Datapipe is recognized as the pioneer of managed services for public cloud platforms. Datapipe has unique expertise in architecting, migrating, managing and securing public cloud, private cloud, hybrid IT and traditional IT. The world’s most trusted brands partner with Datapipe to optimize mission-critical and day-to-day enterprise IT operations, enabling them to transform, innovate, and scale. Backed by a global team of experienced professionals and world-class interconnected data centers, Datapipe provides comprehensive cloud, compliance, security, governance, automation and DevOps solutions. Gartner named Datapipe a leader in the Magic Quadrant for Cloud-Enabled Managed Hosting in 2016.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Bio-Optronics Inc. is proud to announce the latest release of Clinical Conductor CTMS, which provides a modern CTMS workflow designed to seamlessly integrate and streamline the way researchers prepare and conduct patient visits. All patient management information has been condensed to a single page, maximizing usability and improving efficiency significantly for users – a first in the CTMS industry. With a configurable and customizable interface, organizations can view the patient information that is the most important to them. This enhanced patient management solution introduces a variety of features to improve the everyday usability of Clinical Conductor. Users have access to multiple checklists, including patient and visit checklists, providing accountability for successfully complete patient visits. Patient payment information is also accessible on the patient management homepage, providing patients with a quick and easy stipend. The patient management homepage condenses patient information on a single platform; by utilizing the alerts, auto-refresh and configurable action column features, users can complete their tasks with ease. “This latest update is truly remarkable; by providing our users with a simplified solution to their patient management tasks, we improve the way they progress through their clinical trials and boost the quality of care provided to their patients in the process,” says Steve Bailey, Vice President of Clinical Conductor CTMS. Clinical Conductor CTMS is committed to maximizing efficiency and offering features to its users that are aligned to their workflows, and designed to simplify their daily activities. The patient management homepage, with its visually appealing and customizable interface, provides a space for all visit-related information to be easily accessible. The new patient management functionality is now available to all Clinical Conductor Site users. About Bio-Optronics Bio-Optronics is a leading healthcare information technology company, focusing specifically on workflow optimization. Our mission is to develop and deploy software products and services to help healthcare professionals enhance quality, productivity, patient and staff satisfaction. Since 1985, Bio-Optronics has created unique and innovative software solutions for the US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), hospitals, health networks, medical practices, academic medical centers, imaging centers, and all participants in the clinical trial enterprise.


CUYAHOGA FALLS, Ohio--(BUSINESS WIRE)--As hospitals around the world look for new and innovative ways to battle deadly pathogens and kill multi-drug resistant organisms that can cause Hospital Acquired Infections (HAI), Western Reserve Hospital has taken a leap into the future with the installation of a LightStrike™ Germ-Zapping Robot™ that destroys hard-to-kill bugs in hard-to-clean places. Western Reserve Hospital today unveiled the Germ-Zapping Robot that is being used to destroy potentially lethal germs and bacteria lurking in rooms that can pose a risk to patient and employee safety. The Xenex robot, affectionately named “Violet” by Western Reserve Hospital team members, uses Full Spectrum™ pulsed xenon ultraviolet (UV) light to quickly destroy bacteria, viruses, fungi and bacterial spores. The portable disinfection system is effective against even the most dangerous pathogens, including Clostridium difficile (C.diff), norovirus, influenza, Ebola and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, better known as MRSA. “We’ve long been recognized for our commitment to patient satisfaction and exceptional patient care, and a big part of that is providing a thoroughly clean environment at our facility to reduce the risk of hospital-acquired infections,” said Dr. Rick Gemma, general surgeon at Western Reserve Hospital. “Using the latest technology for sanitization, such as the Germ-Zapping Robot, gives the hospital an even greater level of patient safety and cleanliness.” UV has been used for disinfection for decades. The Xenex Germ-Zapping Robot is a new technology that utilizes pulsed xenon (not mercury bulbs) to create germicidal UV light. Pulsed xenon emits high intensity UVC light, which penetrates the cell walls of microorganisms, including bacteria, viruses, mold, fungus and spores. Their DNA is fused, rendering them unable to reproduce or mutate, effectively killing them on surfaces without contact. The portable Xenex system can disinfect a typical patient or procedure room in four- or five-minute cycles without warm-up or cool-down times. It can be used in any department and in any unit within a healthcare facility, including isolation rooms, operating rooms, general patient care rooms, contact precaution areas, emergency rooms, bathrooms and public spaces. The Xenex pulsed xenon UV disinfection system has been credited by healthcare facilities across the U.S. for helping them reduce their infection rates significantly. Several hospitals have published their C.diff, MRSA and Surgical Site infection rate reduction studies in peer-reviewed journals – showing infection rate reductions in excess of 70 percent. Nearly 400 hospitals, Veterans Affairs and DoD facilities in the U.S., Canada, Africa, UK and Europe are using Xenex robots, which are also used in skilled nursing facilities, ambulatory surgery centers and long-term acute care facilities. Western Reserve Hospital is the Northeast Ohio region’s only physician-owned, for-profit, full service hospital. With a commitment to patient satisfaction and improved healthcare delivery, Western Reserve Hospital offers general and acute care services, including a 24/7 emergency department. Western Reserve Hospital is also a teaching facility and sponsors graduate medical education teaching programs in osteopathic medicine. The hospital is a majority physician-owned venture of Western Reserve Hospital Partners, which represents a collaboration of more than 200 physicians, including primary care physicians, surgeons and specialists. Xenex's patented Full SpectrumTM pulsed xenon UV room disinfection system is used for the advanced disinfection of healthcare facilities. Due to its speed and ease of use, the Xenex system has proven to integrate smoothly into hospital cleaning operations. Xenex’s mission is to save lives and reduce suffering by eliminating the deadly microorganisms that cause hospital acquired infections (HAIs). The company is backed by well-known investors that include Malin Corporation, Battery Ventures, Targeted Technology Fund II, Tectonic Ventures and RK Ventures. For more information, visit Xenex.com.

Loading Veterans Affairs collaborators
Loading Veterans Affairs collaborators