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Chelsea, VT, United States

Vermont Law School is a private, American Bar Association‑accredited law school located in South Royalton, Vermont. The Law School has one of the United States' leading programs in environmental law, and it is currently ranked #1 in Environmental Law by U.S. News and World Report; in recent years, the school has been ranked #1 in 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, and 2007, and #2 in 2008 . The Law School offers several degrees, including Juris Doctor , Master of Laws in Environmental Law, Master of Environmental Law and Policy ), and dual degrees with a diverse range of institutions, including the University of Cambridge, the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies, the Thunderbird School of Global Management, and the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth. According to Vermont Law School's 2013 ABA-required disclosures, 54.5% of the Class of 2013 obtained full-time, long-term, JD-required employment nine months after graduation. Wikipedia.


Sovacool B.K.,Vermont Law School
Energy for Sustainable Development | Year: 2013

In Myanmar (Burma), only 13% of the country's population has access to electricity, and almost 95% depends on solid fuels such as wood and rice husks for cooking and heating. This review discusses four sets of energy poverty and access challenges in Myanmar related to poverty and subsistence needs, conflicting priorities, lack of resources, and policy fragmentation. Planners in Myanmar, however, can utilize a variety of mechanisms to overcome these challenges. They can offer financing and micro-financing for woodlots, nurseries, and renewable energy equipment. They can create community mobilization funds to promote women's empowerment and offer skills training. They can implement education and awareness campaigns for households and private sector entrepreneurs, and decentralize energy access programs to communities themselves. The government can promote public private partnerships for larger, grid-connected wind farms, large-scale hydroelectric dams, geothermal power plants, biomass power plants, waste-to-energy facilities, and liquid biofuel manufacturing facilities. Planners can harmonize regulatory authority for energy access to a single agency, establish national technology standards to ensure technical quality, and construct maintenance and training centers to ensure communities care for energy equipment. © 2013 International Energy Initiative. Source


Sovacool B.K.,Vermont Law School
Energy Strategy Reviews | Year: 2013

The provision of energy services through renewable energy is capital intensive and requires significant upfront costs compared to conventional energy technology. In most of cases, government investments and public budgets have proved insufficient to expand access to electricity and modern energy in rural areas in a sustainable manner. There is a great need for mobilizing financial resources to expand local energy services delivery in the developing world. Pro-poor public-private partnerships are one of the best mechanisms to supplement and overcome government budgetary constraints for widening access to energy services, especially to the poor, as they can allocate project-risks between the public and private sector. This article explores eight case studies throughout the world of where pro-poor public private partnerships for renewable energy have expanded access to energy services for those most in need of them. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. Source


Sovacool B.K.,Vermont Law School
Ecological Economics | Year: 2013

Energy security has in recent years grown as a salient policy and political issue. To better understand energy security and sustainability concerns, this study's main objective is to present an energy security index which measures national performance on energy security over time. Based on three years of research involving interviews, surveys, and an international workshop, this study conceptualizes energy security as consisting of the interconnected factors of availability, affordability, efficiency, sustainability, and governance. It then matches these factors with 20 metrics comprising an energy security index, measuring international performance across 18 countries from 1990 to 2010. It offers three case studies of Japan (top performer), Laos (middle performer), and Myanmar (w]orst performer) to provide context to the index's results. It then presents four conclusions. First, a majority of countries analyzed have regressed in terms of their energy security. Second, despite the near total deterioration of energy security, a great disparity exists between countries, with some clear leaders such as Japan. Third, tradeoffs exist within different components of energy security. Fourth, creating energy security is as much a matter of domestic policy from within as it is from foreign policy without. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. Source


Sovacool B.K.,Vermont Law School
Climatic Change | Year: 2012

This essay assesses the "Integrating Climate Change Risks into Resilient Island Planning in the Maldives" Program, or ICCR, a four-year $9.3 million adaptation project supported by the Least Developed Countries Fund, Maldivian Government and the United Nations Development Program. The essay elaborates on the types of challenges that arise as a low-income country tries to utilize international development assistance to adapt to climate change. Based primarily on a series of semi-structured research interviews with Maldivian experts, discussed benefits to the ICCR include improving physical resilience by deploying "soft" infrastructure, institutional resilience by training policymakers, and community resilience by strengthening assets. Challenges include ensuring that adaptation efforts are sufficient to reduce vulnerability, lack of coordination, and the values and attitudes of business and community leaders. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media B.V. Source


Sovacool B.K.,Vermont Law School
Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change | Year: 2012

This article explores the drivers, benefits, and challenges facing climate change adaptation in the Maldives. It specifically investigates the "Integrating Climate Change Risks into Resilient Island Planning in the Maldives" Program, or ICCR, a four-year $9.3 million adaptation project being funded by the Least Developed Countries Fund, Maldivian Government and the United Nations Development Program, and nationally executed by the Ministry of Housing, Transport and Environment of the Maldivian Government. The article asks: what is the perception of coastal adaptation in the Maldives, and what are the potential contributions from the ICCR project? To answer this question, the article summarizes eight primary sectors vulnerable to climate change in the Maldives: human settlements, critical infrastructure, tourism, fisheries, health systems, water, food security, and coral reef biodiversity. It then describes the genesis and background behind the ICCR, which addresses many of these vulnerabilities by demonstrating coastal protection measures. Benefits to the ICCR include improving physical resilience by deploying "soft" infrastructure, institutional resilience by training policymakers and enhancing good governance, and community resilience by strengthening community assets and awareness. Challenges include ensuring that adaptation efforts are enough to truly respond to climate vulnerability, lack of coordination, and short-term thinking among business and community leaders. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V. Source

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