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-- The Knowledge Group/The Knowledge Congress Live Webcast Series, the leading producer of regulatory focused webcasts, has announced today thatwill speak at the Knowledge Group's webcast entitled:This event is scheduled forhttps://www.theknowledgegroup.org/webcasts/technology/business-and-corporation-technology/ransomware-protecting-your-money-and-assetsChristophe Bertrand is the Vice President of Product Marketing at Arcserve. Christophe has spent most of his career in the data storage and data protection space with companies such as Legato Systems (now EMC), VERITAS (now Symantec), Maxtor, Hitachi Data Systems and most recently DataDirect Networks where he ran product, channel and vertical marketing.Christophe earned an MBA from Bradford University (England), a BA in European Business Administration from Middlesex University (England) and a Maitrise degree from the ESC Reims Business School (France).Arcserve is a leading provider of data protection and recovery software that gives organizations the assurance that they can recover their data and applications when needed. Launched in 1990, Arcserve provides a comprehensive solution for cloud, virtual and physical environments, on premise or in the cloud, backed up by unsurpassed support and expertise. Arcserve Unified Data Protection (UDP), available on Arcserve's appliance or your hardware, drives a full range of highly efficient and integrated data protection capabilities through a simple, web-based user console. Arcserve has a customer base of 45,000 end users in more than 150 countries and partners with over 7,500 distributors, resellers and service providers around the world. Arcserve is headquartered in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Visit www.arcserve.com Organizations like yours are concerned about ransomware. Technology leaders Arcserve and VIPRE joined forces to help you defeat those ransomware hoodlums lurking in the dark cyberspace. From preventative measures with VIPRE, to remediation strategies with Arcserve, plus legal and regulatory guidance about ransomware from VLP, you will:·         Watch as we dissect common variants like Locky, Petya, TeslaCrypt and Cerber·         Learn how to stop ransomware attacks before they happen·         Get practical advice on how to get back on your feet if an attacker does get through·         Discover what others have done – without opening their wallets – to defeat the threatFind out how to fend off and remediate ransomware attacks.The Knowledge Group was established with the mission to produce unbiased, objective, and educational live webinars that examine industry trends and regulatory changes from a variety of different perspectives. The goal is to deliver a unique multilevel analysis of an important issue affecting business in a highly focused format. To contact or register for an event, please visit: http://theknowledgegroup.org/


News Article | December 7, 2016
Site: www.businesswire.com

ARLINGTON, Va.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Today ThreatConnect® provider of the industry’s only intelligence-driven defense platform, announced the hiring of John Lyons as senior vice president, global sales. Lyons will provide primary leadership and management for all aspects of the selling process and will be responsible for strategy, planning, and execution of sales activities worldwide. He will report directly to CEO, Adam Vincent and drive the overall productivity and effectiveness of the ThreatConnect sales organization. Lyons comes to ThreatConnect with more than 25 years of experience in technology, sales, and sales leadership. Prior to joining the company, he was President of ThreatTrack Security, Inc. and also served as Vice President of Sales for North and South America at Tenable Network Security, Inc. Lyons has also held management roles with Seagate Software, VERITAS, Peopleclick, and UniNet. Adam Vincent, ThreatConnect CEO said, “We are so excited to have John on board. With John’s experience growing start-ups into industry-leaders, we are looking forward to ThreatConnect’s future. As the market leader in our space already, we expect that John will help us continue to be successful providing our customers the only true intelligence-driven platform available.” ThreatConnect® unites cybersecurity people, processes and technologies behind a cohesive intelligence-driven defense. Built for security teams at all maturity levels, the ThreatConnect platform enables organizations to benefit from their collective knowledge and talents; develop security processes; and leverage their existing technologies to identify, protect and respond to threats in a measurable way. More than 1,200 companies and agencies worldwide use ThreatConnect to maximize the value of their security technology investments, combat the fragmentation of their security organizations, and enhance their infrastructure with relevant threat intelligence. To learn more, visit: www.threatconnect.com.


SAN DIEGO--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Reflexion Health, Inc., a digital healthcare company, in conjunction with the Duke Clinical Research Institute (DCRI) announced the enrollment of the first patients in Virtual Exercise Rehabilitation In-home Therapy: A Research Study (VERITAS), which is designed to evaluate the cost and outcomes of using a virtual rehabilitation platform to deliver physical therapy following total knee replacement (TKR) surgery. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Preven


News Article | January 12, 2016
Site: phys.org

The Crab pulsar is the corpse left over when the star that created the Crab nebula exploded as a supernova. It has a mass of 1.5 the mass of the Sun concentrated in about 10 kilometers diameter object, rotates 30 times per second, and is surrounded by a region of intense magnetic field ten thousand billion times stronger than that of the Sun. This field is strong enough to dominate the motion of charges and forces them to rotate at the same rate as the stellar surface. This region is called the magnetosphere. The rotation of the magnetic field also generates intense electric fields that literally tear electrons from the surface. As these accelerated electrons stream outward, they produce beams of radiation that we receive every time the beam crosses our line of sight, like a lighthouse. In 2011, the MAGIC and VERITAS observatories discovered unexpected very energetic photons. Emma de Oña Wilhelmi from the Institute of Space Sciences (IEEC-CSIC, Barcelona) and Principal Investigator of this observation program says: "We performed deep observation of the Crab pulsar with MAGIC to understand this phenomenon, expecting to measure the maximum energy of the pulsating photons". Roberta Zanin from (ICCUB-IEEC, Barcelona) continues: "The new observations extend this tail to much higher, above TeV energies, that is, several times more energetic than the previous measurement, violating all the theory models believed to be at work in neutron stars." The photons arrive in two precise beams which should be created far from the neutron star surface: on the far end of the magnetosphere or outside it, in the ultra-relativistic wind of particles around the pulsar, to be able to accelerate electrons to such energies and to escape the large absorption in the magnetised atmosphere. But very surprisingly, the TeV beams arrive at the same time as the radio and X-ray beams, which are very likely produced within the magnetosphere. This tight synchronization of the beams at different energies implies that the bright radiation observed in the multi-wavelength spectrum is produced altogether in a rather small region. Alternatively one can say that the electrons responsible from the TeV radiation keep somehow memory of the low-energy beams. Daniel Galindo Fernandez (ICCUB-IEEC, Barcelona) says: "Where and how this TeV emission is created remains still unknown and difficult to reconcile with the standard theories." and David Carreto Fidalgo from Complutense University of Madrid adds: "But how and where this effect is achieved in such a small region challenges our knowledge of physics". MAGIC Spokeperson Razmik Mirzoyan from the Max Planck Institute for Physics (MPP) in Munich (Germany) says: "This is another very important result achieved by MAGIC on the puzzling celestial object, which incidentally besides the Sun is the most investigated one in all energy ranges. Hence from the beginning of operation of the MAGIC experiment in 2004, we have been intensively observing the Crab Nebula and the Crab pulsar. And that has really paid-off- in the mean time we revealed significant features of this enigmatic object thus providing substantial input to our theory colleagues- now it is their move to explain how the things are at work. MAGIC has been designed to be the most suitable instrument among imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes to perform this kind of observations." The Crab pulsar, created in a supernova explosion that occurred in 1054 A.D., is located at a distance of about 6500 light years at the center of a magnetized nebula visible in the Taurus constellation. The Crab is the most powerful pulsar in our galaxy and it is one of only a few pulsars detected across all wavelengths, from radio up to gamma rays. In its rotating magnetic field , electrons and positrons are accelerated up to relativistic energies and emit radiation that arrives to our telescopes in the form of pulses every 33 millisecond, each time the neutron star rotates and meets our telescopic sight. Before the MAGIC measurement this radiation was believed to stop abruptly when the photons reach a energy few billion times larger than visible light. MAGIC is a ground-based gamma-ray instrument located on the Canary island of La Palma, Spain. The system of two 17m diameter Cherenkov telescopes is currently one of the three major imaging atmospheric Cherenkov instruments in the world. It is designed to detect gamma rays tens of billions to tens of trillions times more energetic than visible light. MAGIC has been built with the joint efforts of a largely European collaboration that includes about 160 researchers from Germany, Spain, Italy, Switzerland, Poland, Finland, Bulgaria, Croatia, India and Japan. More information: S. Ansoldi et al. Teraelectronvolt pulsed emission from the Crab Pulsar detected by MAGIC, Astronomy & Astrophysics (2016). DOI: 10.1051/0004-6361/201526853


News Article | January 13, 2016
Site: www.rdmag.com

Scientists working with the Major Atmospheric Gamma-ray Imaging Cherenkov (MAGIC) observatory have reported the discovery of the most energetic pulsed emission radiation ever detected from the neutron star in the center of the supernova of 1054 A.D., known as the Crab pulsar. The Crab pulsar is the corpse left over when the star that created the Crab nebula exploded as a supernova. It has a mass of 1.5 the mass of the Sun concentrated in about 10 kilometers diameter object, rotates 30 times per second, and is surrounded by a region of intense magnetic field ten thousand billion times stronger than that of the Sun. This field is strong enough to dominate the motion of charges and forces them to rotate at the same rate as the stellar surface. This region is called the magnetosphere. The rotation of the magnetic field also generates intense electric fields that literally tear electrons from the surface. As these accelerated electrons stream outward, they produce beams of radiation that we receive every time the beam crosses our line of sight, like a lighthouse. In 2011, the MAGIC and VERITAS observatories discovered unexpected very energetic photons. Emma de Oña Wilhelmi from the Institute of Space Sciences (IEEC-CSIC, Barcelona) and Principal Investigator of this observation program says: "We performed deep observation of the Crab pulsar with MAGIC to understand this phenomenon, expecting to measure the maximum energy of the pulsating photons". Roberta Zanin from (ICCUB-IEEC, Barcelona) continues: "The new observations extend this tail to much higher, above TeV energies, that is, several times more energetic than the previous measurement, violating all the theory models believed to be at work in neutron stars." The photons arrive in two precise beams which should be created far from the neutron star surface: on the far end of the magnetosphere or outside it, in the ultra-relativistic wind of particles around the pulsar, to be able to accelerate electrons to such energies and to escape the large absorption in the magnetised atmosphere. But very surprisingly, the TeV beams arrive at the same time as the radio and X-ray beams, which are very likely produced within the magnetosphere. This tight synchronization of the beams at different energies implies that the bright radiation observed in the multi-wavelength spectrum is produced altogether in a rather small region. Alternatively one can say that the electrons responsible from the TeV radiation keep somehow memory of the low-energy beams. Daniel Galindo Fernandez (ICCUB-IEEC, Barcelona) says: "Where and how this TeV emission is created remains still unknown and difficult to reconcile with the standard theories." and David Carreto Fidalgo from Complutense University of Madrid adds: "But how and where this effect is achieved in such a small region challenges our knowledge of physics". MAGIC Spokeperson Razmik Mirzoyan from the Max Planck Institute for Physics (MPP) in Munich (Germany) says: "This is another very important result achieved by MAGIC on the puzzling celestial object, which incidentally besides the Sun is the most investigated one in all energy ranges. Hence from the beginning of operation of the MAGIC experiment in 2004, we have been intensively observing the Crab Nebula and the Crab pulsar. And that has really paid-off- in the mean time we revealed significant features of this enigmatic object thus providing substantial input to our theory colleagues- now it is their move to explain how the things are at work. MAGIC has been designed to be the most suitable instrument among imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes to perform this kind of observations." The Crab pulsar, created in a supernova explosion that occurred in 1054 A.D., is located at a distance of about 6500 light years at the center of a magnetized nebula visible in the Taurus constellation. The Crab is the most powerful pulsar in our galaxy and it is one of only a few pulsars detected across all wavelengths, from radio up to gamma rays. In its rotating magnetic field , electrons and positrons are accelerated up to relativistic energies and emit radiation that arrives to our telescopes in the form of pulses every 33 millisecond, each time the neutron star rotates and meets our telescopic sight. Before the MAGIC measurement this radiation was believed to stop abruptly when the photons reach a energy few billion times larger than visible light. MAGIC is a ground-based gamma-ray instrument located on the Canary island of La Palma, Spain. The system of two 17m diameter Cherenkov telescopes is currently one of the three major imaging atmospheric Cherenkov instruments in the world. It is designed to detect gamma rays tens of billions to tens of trillions times more energetic than visible light. MAGIC has been built with the joint efforts of a largely European collaboration that includes about 160 researchers from Germany, Spain, Italy, Switzerland, Poland, Finland, Bulgaria, Croatia, India and Japan.


News Article | November 1, 2016
Site: www.marketwired.com

SEATTLE, WA--(Marketwired - Nov 1, 2016) - Qumulo, the leader in data-aware scale-out NAS, today announced that Eric Scollard has joined the company as vice president of worldwide sales. Scollard will be responsible for leading Qumulo's sales organization and driving rapid growth in revenue and customers. "We are extremely impressed with Eric's proven ability to build and grow sales organizations for numerous industry leaders," said Peter Godman, co-founder and CEO of Qumulo. "We are confident that he will play a critical role in Qumulo's continued success and will help the company be who the world trusts to store, manage and curate its most valuable asset, data." Scollard is a veteran executive with extensive experience scaling teams and growing sales in the storage industry. He was the first VP of sales at Isilon Systems, where he built the sales organization from scratch and grew revenues from $0 to nearly $100M in less than five years, culminating in the most successful technology IPO of 2006. Scollard additionally served as the VP of sales at Ocarina Networks, which was acquired by Dell, and was the VP of sales at Bycast, which was acquired by NetApp. Earlier in his career, he held sales leadership roles at EMC, IBM, and VERITAS, with increasing responsibilities and results at each. Most recently, Eric was SVP of worldwide sales for ExtraHop Networks where he grew bookings by 10X in less than five years. "I've been working with Qumulo since its inception in an advisory capacity and am impressed with the accelerating growth and customer traction," said Scollard. "This is an amazing technology that is going to change the industry like we did at Isilon. We are building a world class sales organization to deliver this technology to our customers and partners." Qumulo offers the world's first data-aware scale-out NAS software, delivering real-time analytics that provide visibility into data usage and storage across flexible, fast and highly scalable commodity hardware. Earlier this year, Qumulo announced an upgrade to its flagship software product and hardware line. Qumulo Core 2.0 and its three new QC-Series hybrid storage appliances -- the QC40, QC104, and QC260 -- continue to provide customers with an agile platform that can readily be refreshed with the newest hardware for maximum performance, capacity and cost benefits. The company also announced $32.5 million in Series C funding in June. Suggested Tweet: .@Qumulo appoints Eric Scollard as vice president of worldwide sales to drive rapid growth http://qumulo.com/3413 About Qumulo Qumulo, headquartered in Seattle, pioneered data-aware scale-out NAS, enabling enterprises to manage and store enormous numbers of digital assets through real-time analytics built directly into the file system. Qumulo Core is a software-only solution designed to leverage the price/performance of commodity hardware coupled with the modern technologies of flash, virtualization and cloud. Qumulo was founded in 2012 by the inventors of scale-out NAS, and has attracted a team of storage innovators from Isilon, Amazon Web Services, Google, and Microsoft. Qumulo has raised $100 million in three rounds of funding from leading investors. For more information, visit www.qumulo.com


News Article | January 18, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

The Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) and NASA may team up for a mission to Venus. The two would be going ahead and initiating a research on the scorching hot planet's mysteries and also whether Venus is hostile to life. The mission has been dubbed Venera-D and would send an orbiter and a lander to the planet. The D in the name of the mission stands for dolgozhivushaya which means "long lasting" in Russian. NASA has passed two missions - VERITAS and DAVINCI, earlier this month to examine the surface and atmosphere of Earth's neighbor, Venus. Venera-D happens to be one more Venus mission with two of the World's most well-equipped agencies teaming up for the purpose. The proposed joint mission would analyze Venus' atmosphere for 3 years with an orbiter, as well as a lander that would be present for a few hours on the planet's burning surface. Although, Russia wanted more time on the planet's surface, the costs involved made this impossible. "Russia has always been interested in going back to Venus," said David Senske, of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California Senske further added that NASA got involved with the process about three years ago, when Russia asked the U.S. space agency on its willingness to collaborate on the mission. The two space agencies NASA and Russia's Roscosmos are anticipating the possibility of finding microbial life and come up with a deeper understanding of the habitable environment on Venus's atmosphere. "A joint working team put forward several scenarios of the project in October, with Russian and American competences complementing each other. After that we discussed the matter with NASA Deputy Administrator Dava Newman, who confirmed NASA's interest to the Venera-D project," said Lev Zeleny,Director of the Space Research Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences. Space.com reported that Russia would be in the pilot's seat for this mission by developing the launching systems, the lander and the orbiter. NASA is also expected to contribute additional scientific instruments to aid the mission. For nearly two years, discussions on the possibility of cooperation with NASA on the project has been ongoing. The last landing dates back to 1985 when a capsule of the Soviet's Vega-2 robot had reached the planet. The Venera-D mission is expected to launch in the second half of 2020. An international team of scientists would be delivering their final report on the mission to the two space agencies later this month. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | October 28, 2016
Site: co.newswire.com

Shore Physicians Group in Southern New Jersey is partnering with Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania-based VERITAS using this new Medicare reimbursement to launch a service that helps keep some of its most challenging patients healthy.


News Article | April 13, 2016
Site: www.nature.com

After an unplanned five-year detour, Japan’s Venus probe, Akatsuki, has come back to life with a bang. On 4–8 April, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) presented the first scientific results from the spacecraft since it was rescued from an errant orbit around the Sun and rerouted to circle Venus, four months ago. These include a detailed shot of streaked, acidic clouds and a mysterious moving ‘bow’ shape in the planet’s atmosphere. Despite the probe’s tumble around the Solar System, its instruments are working “almost perfectly”, Akatsuki project manager Masato Nakamura, a planetary scientist at JAXA’s Institute of Space and Astronautical Science in Sagamihara, Japan, announced at the Inter­national Venus Conference in Oxford, UK. And if another small manoeuvre in two years’ time is successful, he said, the spacecraft might avoid Venus’s solar-power-draining shadow, and so be able to orbit the planet for five years, rather than the two it was initially assigned. Akatsuki, which means ‘dawn’ in Japanese, launched in 2010 and was supposed to enter into orbit around Venus later that year to study the planet’s thick atmosphere. The mission would include looking for signs of active volcanos and other geology. But upon entry, a fault in a valve caused the probe’s main engine to blow, and the craft instead entered an orbit around the Sun. As Akatsuki passed near Venus in December, JAXA engineers managed to salvage the mission by instructing the craft’s much smaller, secondary thrusters to push it into a looping elliptical orbit around the planet. The results presented in Oxford were captured from this vantage point with a suite of five cameras that capture light ranging from infrared to ultraviolet. A highly detailed shot of dense layers within Venus’s sulfuric acid clouds elicited applause from the audience. The highest-quality infrared image of this view of Venus, it suggests that the processes that underlie cloud formation might be more complicated than thought, project scientist Takeshi Imamura told attendees. And the team expects still better results to come. The image was taken from 100,000 kilometres away — more than 10 times the probe’s distance at its closest pass of Venus. “We will achieve better spatial resolution still,” said Takehiko Satoh, principal investigator for the probe’s 2-micrometre infrared camera, IR2, which took the image. “We promise to give a fantastic data set to the research community for years.” The bow shape, which was seen in thermal images taken using a long-wave infrared (LIR) camera, provided some intrigue. The moving cloud formation, which swept from pole to pole across the planet for days, seemed to rotate with Venus’s surface, rather than with its much quicker-moving atmosphere. The motion suggests that the front could be linked to features on the ground, said Makoto Taguchi, who leads the LIR camera. Others at the conference were at a loss as to what may have caused it. “It’s certainly mysterious,” says planetary scientist Suzanne Smrekar of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. Akatsuki’s success has cheered researchers, especially because it is now the only working probe deployed at Venus. “The mood is very good,” says Colin Wilson, a planetary scientist at the University of Oxford, UK. Akatsuki’s orbit — which was tweaked slightly on 4 April to give the probe the best chance of lasting for years to come, as well as to provide a good scientific vantage point — will allow it to survey Venus’s equator as originally planned. The resulting images will complement surveys of the planet’s poles from the European Space Agency’s Venus Express orbiter, which ended its mission in 2014. But Akatsuki’s new lease of life comes with compromises, too. Its current 10.5-day operational orbit takes it almost 5 times as far from Venus at its most distant point than its original intended orbit (see ‘Orbital alteration’). Except for those taken during the short period when the probe sweeps close to the planet, images will be lower in resolution than planned. This means that studies that require detail, such as spotting flashes of lightning, will take longer. But the team said that it plans to make the best of the probe’s wide orbit to take whole-Venus images that track large-scale features over time. The mission has also not shrugged off all consequences of its long and unexpected cruise around the Sun. One camera malfunctioned in January, probably because of gradual contamination of a helium coolant with water vapour over the years, said Satoh. Engineers have now fixed the problem by warming the coolant to disperse the vapour, but it took a while. “We had a painful blank of about a month,” says Satoh. Planetary scientists outside of JAXA will have to wait a year from acquisition to access the data, but they are nonetheless excited by the probe’s initial success. Two Venus-based projects are among five proposals shortlisted by NASA for possible launch in the early 2020s. The agency is expected to decide by the end of December, and Venus missions could get a boost from Akatsuki’s success — especially if the orbiter finds intriguing features that require follow up, says Smrekar, who leads one of the Venus proposals that NASA is considering, the proposed VERITAS radar orbiter. “If they’re able to see new volcanism, for example, it definitely makes the case for going back to explore more fully,” she says.


News Article | April 13, 2016
Site: www.nature.com

When the first robotic probe penetrated Venus’s cloud-filled atmosphere in 1967, it was designed to float. At the time, the surface of Venus was a complete mystery, and the engineers behind the Soviet Venera 4 thought it might land in a vast ocean. Science-fiction writers had imagined tropical swamps, forests or water worlds beneath the clouds. Venus’s mass, density and composition were all similar to Earth’s, and it was our closest neighbour, so it looked like a good bet for native life and even human colonization. Instead, Venera 4 was destroyed before it reached the surface. The readout from its descent, and from subsequent probes, revealed extreme pressure, searing temperatures close to 500 °C and an atmosphere that was 95% carbon dioxide. Even though Venus was originally very like Earth, perhaps even replete with oceans, a runaway greenhouse effect had turned it into a hellhole. No one, it seemed, would be going to holiday on Venus any time soon. The discovery that the brightest body in the sky, bar the Sun and the Moon, is so hostile to life has helped to turn humanity’s attention to Mars, our next-closest neighbour. Not only is the red planet a more viable candidate for an off-Earth base, it is much easier to study. On Venus, dense clouds of sulfuric acid mean that only radar can trace the surface from the air. Two rovers are trawling Mars right now, and more are in the pipeline; on Venus, probes designed to drop to the surface must deal with an environment that can melt metal. So despite being the first planet to be visited by a probe, Earth’s closest neighbour remains little-known. Venus’s atmosphere contains a mystery substance, detected because it absorbs ultraviolet light, but so far unidentified. Scientists don’t agree on how the planet’s relatively young surface is remade, or how active its volcanoes are. The mechanism behind its enormous winds — which hit at several hundred kilometres per hour — is a mystery, as is why Venus rotates on its axis in the opposite direction to Earth. Does it have lightning? The jury is out. Venus scientists feel that their planet is neglected. Despite a flurry of visits in the first decades of interplanetary exploration, NASA hasn’t been to the planet since the Magellan mission ended in 1994. The European Space Agency’s Venus Express orbiter filled a gap when it observed the planet from 2006 to 2014, but at €220 million (US$252 million) it was a relatively small mission, and it could only peer at Venus from orbit. Now, after a rocky journey, Japan’s Akatsuki mission — which many wrote off as lost when its main engine failed in 2010 — has entered Venusian orbit and is revealing intriguing results about the planet’s climate. In its wake is another glimmer of hope: two Venus projects are among five proposals shortlisted for NASA’s next $500-million Discovery mission, launching in the early 2020s. VERITAS (Venus Emissivity, Radio Science, InSAR, Topography, and Spectroscopy) is a high-resolution radar mapper that would study the planet from the sky; the DAVINCI (Deep Atmosphere Venus Investigation of Noble gases, Chemistry, and Imaging) probe would sample the atmosphere during an hour-long plunge to the surface. Project leaders hope that compelling findings by Akatsuki will generate excitement about the planet at just the right time. Given that life and the ability to sustain it will always be a selling point for an interplanetary mission, and that the only hope for life on Venus would be in its upper atmosphere, Venus’s fall from favour might be understandable. But the planet holds a trump card. Increasingly, astronomers are searching for exo-Earths — extrasolar planets that, given their similarity to Earth, are a good bet for life. There, Venus can tell a cautionary tale. Despite starting out with all the ingredients for life, at some point Venus went rogue and became the hellish, acidic, dry planet it is today. Although life might not be found in a Venusian jungle, understanding why the planet took the path it did might be crucial to finding life elsewhere.

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