CHAPEL HILL, NC, United States

Verde Environmental Technologies, Inc.

www.TELESAGERESEARCH.COM
CHAPEL HILL, NC, United States
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Herwadkar A.,Mercer University | Singh N.,Mercer University | Anderson C.,Verde Environmental Technologies, Inc. | Korey A.,Verde Environmental Technologies, Inc. | And 2 more authors.
Pharmaceutical Research | Year: 2015

Purpose: The objective of this work was to identify deactivation agents and develop a disposal system for unused/ residual/ expired medications. Methods: Deactivation agents screened included oxidizing agent-sodium percarbonate, hydrolysis agent- sodium carbonate and adsorbants- zeolite and activated carbon. Deactivation studies using these agents were performed on four active pharmaceutical agents (APIs) including ketoprofen, dexamethasone sodium phosphate, metformin hydrochloride and amoxicillin trihydrate. Disposal systems were also designed for deactivation studies on dexamethasone pills, amoxicillin trihydrate capsules and fentanyl transdermal patches (Duragesic®). Briefly, APIs/ dosage forms were allowed to be in close contact with deactivation agents for a specified period of time and percentage decrease in the amount of API from the initial amount was measured. Results: Sodium percarbonate and sodium carbonate were only successful in deactivation of amoxicillin trihydrate API. Adsorption agents resulted in more universal deactivation with activated carbon resulting in efficient deactivation of most APIs and all dosage forms tested. Also adsorption of oral dosage medications on activated carbons was maintained even on dilution and shaking and no desorption was observed. Conclusions: Deactivation systems containing activated carbon are promising for efficient, safe and environment friendly disposal of unused/residual/expired medications. © 2015 Springer Science+Business Media New York


Trademark
Verde Environmental Technologies, Inc. and Travanti Pharma | Date: 2012-12-11

Medical disposal kits for disposing of medical waste comprised of sealable containers prefilled with drug deactivation agents.


PubMed | Verde Environmental Technologies, Inc. and Mercer University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Pharmaceutical research | Year: 2015

The objective of this work was to identify deactivation agents and develop a disposal system for unused/ residual/ expired medications.Deactivation agents screened included oxidizing agent-sodium percarbonate, hydrolysis agent- sodium carbonate and adsorbants- zeolite and activated carbon. Deactivation studies using these agents were performed on four active pharmaceutical agents (APIs) including ketoprofen, dexamethasone sodium phosphate, metformin hydrochloride and amoxicillin trihydrate. Disposal systems were also designed for deactivation studies on dexamethasone pills, amoxicillin trihydrate capsules and fentanyl transdermal patches (Duragesic). Briefly, APIs/ dosage forms were allowed to be in close contact with deactivation agents for a specified period of time and percentage decrease in the amount of API from the initial amount was measured.Sodium percarbonate and sodium carbonate were only successful in deactivation of amoxicillin trihydrate API. Adsorption agents resulted in more universal deactivation with activated carbon resulting in efficient deactivation of most APIs and all dosage forms tested. Also adsorption of oral dosage medications on activated carbons was maintained even on dilution and shaking and no desorption was observed.Deactivation systems containing activated carbon are promising for efficient, safe and environment friendly disposal of unused/residual/expired medications.


Trademark
Verde Environmental Technologies, Inc. | Date: 2015-08-14

Activated carbons for deactivating drugs for environmentally safe disposal.


Trademark
Verde Environmental Technologies, Inc. | Date: 2015-08-14

Activated carbons for deactivating drugs for environmentally safe disposal.


Trademark
Verde Environmental Technologies, Inc. | Date: 2013-03-04

Transdermal patch disposal systems incorporating a deactivating agent.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.16K | Year: 2013

Under this Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I project, Reasearch Topic 148, the Contractor will develop an inexpensive in-home product for rapid and safe at-source deactivation of discarded psychoactive pharmaceuticals. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 969.65K | Year: 2014

In-Home Deactivation System for Psychoactive Drugs. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE


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