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Blair B.D.,University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee | Crago J.P.,University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee | Hedman C.J.,University of Wisconsin - Madison | Treguer R.J.F.,Veolia Water North America | And 3 more authors.
Science of the Total Environment | Year: 2013

Current wastewater treatment processes are insufficient at removing many pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) from wastewater and it is necessary to identify the chemical characteristics that determine their fate. Models that predict the fate of various chemicals lack verification using in situ data, particularly for PPCPs. BIOWIN4 is a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model that has been proposed to estimate the removal of PPCPs from wastewater, but data verifying the accuracy of its predictions is limited. In this study, the in situ soluble and suspended solid concentrations were assessed from raw influent, primary effluent, secondary effluent, and final effluent for 54 PPCPs and hormones over six dates. When assessing the removal efficiency across the different stages of the WWTP, the majority of the removal occurred across the secondary treatment process for the majority of the compounds. The primary treatment and disinfection process had limited impacts on the removal of most PPCPs. Sorption to solids was found to influence the removal for compounds with a log octanol-water partitioning coefficient greater than 4.5 across the secondary treatment process. For other compounds, the removal of PPCPs across the secondary treatment process was significantly correlated with the biodegradation predicted by BIOWIN4. Removal efficiencies across the aerobic secondary treatment process were predicted by integrating BIOWIN4 into pseudo-first order kinetics of PPCPs and these predicted values were compared to the in situ data. This study determines that under a certain set of operating conditions, two chemical characteristics - the expected hydrophobic interaction and the modeled biological degradation from BIOWIN4 - were found to predict the removal of highly degradable and recalcitrant PPCPs from a wastewater secondary treatment process. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.


BOSTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The city of Jackson, Mississippi has signed a 10-year operations and management agreement with Veolia Water North America - South, LLC, a part of Veolia Environnement (Veolia). Veolia, the global leader in environmental solutions and optimized resource management, will operate the area’s three wastewater treatment plants and will provide other related infrastructure services and activities. As part of the partnership, Veolia will be responsible for operating Jackson’s three wastewater treatment facilities (Savanna, Trahon and Presidential Hills) with a combined design capacity of approximately 125 million gallons per day. Veolia personnel also will assume responsibility for 98 pumping stations and sludge disposal. The city of Jackson will continue to own all assets and maintain authority over the setting of rates and short- and long-term capital planning, but will rely on world-class expertise from Veolia to provide day-to-day O&M services. The company and its personnel will support planning objectives for capital improvements, maintenance requirements, and policy and regulatory efforts. The selection of Veolia allows the city of Jackson to access industry best practices and the knowledge and experience gained from Veolia’s operation of 8,500 water and wastewater facilities around the globe. “Operations and maintenance of critical wastewater infrastructure is one of our core functions as a global environmental services provider,” said John Gibson, president and COO of Veolia North America’s Municipal & Commercial business. “Jackson’s selection of Veolia as its environmental services partner helps the city leverage Veolia’s experience and provides Veolia the opportunity to make a difference in the city of Jackson and improve service levels and wastewater quality and compliance.” The contract will focus on a number of key areas identified by the city of Jackson during the competitive bidding process, including: Veolia is also committing to provide Jackson technical and management assistance in meeting the terms of the city’s 2012 Consent Decree and will help the city maintain environmental compliance. Veolia will operate the wastewater treatment system and facilities that serve the City and parts of Hinds County, western Rankin County and eastern Madison County. Veolia is committed to supporting Jackson’s Triple Bottom Line (3BL), an accountability framework that measures quality of life improvements; efforts to stabilize the City’s economic base; and implementation of compliant solutions that improve the resilience and vibrancy of all communities in the City of Jackson. “Our local team looks forward to achieving Mayor Yarber’s vision of a resilient and vibrant community and appreciates the trust and confidence the mayor, the city council, and the Department of Public Works has placed in Veolia. We look forward to the chance to make a difference in the lives of area residents through our partnership and provide opportunities for local businesses and quality of life enhancements in Jackson,” added Gibson. The company intends to exceed the city’s minority and female business enterprise contracting goals outlined in the bidding process through partnerships with local subcontractors, ensuring that the company provides jobs and opportunities for area businesses keeping money in the local community. The contract was signed with Veolia Water North America - South, LLC, a legal entity of Veolia Environnement. Veolia group is the global leader in optimized resource management. With over 174 000 employees worldwide, the Group designs and provides water, waste and energy management solutions that contribute to the sustainable development of communities and industries. Through its three complementary business activities, Veolia helps to develop access to resources, preserve available resources, and to replenish them. In 2015, the Veolia group supplied 100 million people with drinking water and 63 million people with wastewater service, produced 63 million megawatt hours of energy and converted 42.9 million metric tons of waste into new materials and energy. Veolia Environnement (listed on Paris Euronext: VIE) recorded consolidated revenue of €25 billion ($27.2 billion) in 2015. www.veolia.com ~10 year contract (with a five-year renewal option) for Operations and Maintenance (O&M) of city’s wastewater treatment plants and lift stations ~Will target robust Equal Business Opportunity participation goals through agreements with local businesses


Lundberg L.A.,Veolia Water North America
Proceedings of the Air and Waste Management Association's Annual Conference and Exhibition, AWMA | Year: 2011

One key characteristic of biosolids is its inherent energy value. Biosolids consist of about 55-85% volatile solids that include a wide variety of organic compounds that can either be used directly for their fuel value or converted into methane, which can be used as a fuel. Gasification or pyrolysis systems have more attractive options than incineration for biosolids management. Such systems have been used extensively for wood or biomass processing, but have yet had only limited application in the wastewater industry. This is because gasification systems require that the feed have relatively low moisture content, well below levels typically achievable through biosolids dewatering alone. Drying requires a substantial amount of thermal energy, thus placing a parasitic burden on the overall thermal efficiency of these systems. A discussion covers the comparative energy balances for these alternatives; relative energy recovery efficiency; operating characteristics for each approach; and practical limitations, advantages, and disadvantages. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the 104th AWMA Annual Conference and Exhibition 2011 (Orlando, FL 6/21-24/2011).


Bayart J.-B.,Veolia | Worbe S.,Veolia | Grimaud J.,Veolia Water North America | Aoustin E.,Veolia
International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment | Year: 2014

Purpose: Along with climate change-related issues, improved water management is recognized as one of the major challenges to sustainability. However, there are still no commonly accepted methods for measuring sustainability of water uses, resulting in a recent proliferation of water footprint methodologies. The Water Impact Index presented in this paper aims to integrate the issues of volume, scarcity and quality into a single indicator to assess the reduction of available water for the environment induced by freshwater uses for human activities. Methods: The Water Impact Index follows life cycle thinking principles. For each unit process, a volumetric water balance is performed; water flows crossing the boundaries between the techno-sphere and environment are multiplied by a water quality index and a water scarcity index. The methodology is illustrated on the current municipal wastewater management system of Milan (Italy). The Water Impact Index is combined with carbon footprint to introduce multi-impact thinking to decision makers. The Water Impact Index is further compared to results obtained using a set of three life cycle impact indicators related to water, from the ReCiPe life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) methodology. Results and discussion: Onsite water use is the main contribution to the Water Impact Index for both wastewater management schemes. The release of better quality water is the main driver in favour of the scenario including a wastewater treatment plant, while the energy and chemicals consumed for the treatment increase the indirect water footprint and carbon footprint. Results obtained with the three midpoint indicators depict similar tendencies to the Water Impact Index. Conclusions: This paper presents a simplified single-indicator approach for water footprinting, integrating volume, scarcity and quality issues, representing an initial step toward a better understanding and assessment of the environmental impacts of human activities on water resources. The wastewater treatment plant reduces the Water Impact Index of the wastewater management system. These results are consistent with the profile of the three midpoint indicators related to water from ReCiPe. © 2014 Springer-Verlag.


Ge Z.,University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee | Zhang F.,University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee | Grimaud J.,Veolia Water North America | Hurst J.,Veolia Water North America | He Z.,University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee
Bioresource Technology | Year: 2013

The long-term performance of sludge treatment in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) was examined by operating two MFCs for almost 500. days. In Phase I, one MFC fed with primary sludge removed 69.8. ±. 24.1% of total chemical oxygen demand (TCOD) and 68.4. ±. 17.9% of volatile suspended solids (VSS); the other MFC with digested sludge reduced 36.2. ±. 24.4% of TCOD and 46.1. ±. 19.2% of VSS. In Phase II, both MFCs were operated as a two-stage system that removed 60% of TCOD and 70% of VSS from the primary sludge. An energy analysis revealed that, although the total energy in the MFC system was comparable with that of anaerobic digesters, the electric energy had a minor contribution and methane gas still dominated the total energy production. The results suggest that MFCs may not be suitable for treating primary sludge for energy recovery, but could potentially be used to polish the effluent from anaerobic digesters. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.


Zhang F.,University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee | Ge Z.,University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee | Grimaud J.,Veolia Water North America | Hurst J.,Veolia Water North America | He Z.,University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee
Bioresource Technology | Year: 2013

To examine the feasibility of integrating microbial fuel cells (MFCs) into an activated sludge process, three MFCs with different ion exchange membranes and/or cathode catalysts were installed in an aeration tank to treat primary effluent. Both contaminant treatment and electricity generation were studied during the operation for more than 400. days. The effects of membrane/catalysts on MFC performance were not observed, likely due to the low removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) (<53%) caused by low electricity generation. The MFCs did not achieve any obvious removal of nutrients. The produced energy was lower than the theoretic energy consumption. The performance was seriously affected by cathode biofouling, variation of wastewater quality, and other operating conditions. Unlike prior lab studies by others, the results of this study suggest that MFCs may not be suitable for deployment in an aeration tank, unless the key problems such as biofouling are solved. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.


Zhang F.,University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee | Ge Z.,University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee | Grimaud J.,Veolia Water North America | Hurst J.,Veolia Water North America | He Z.,University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee
Bioresource Technology | Year: 2013

The use of spiral spacers to create a helical flow for improving electricity generation in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) was investigated in both laboratory and on-site tests. The lab tests found that the MFC with the spiral spacers produced more electricity than the one without the spiral spacers at different recirculation rates or organic loading rates, likely due to the improved transport/distribution of ions and electron mediators instead of the substrates because the organic removal efficiency was not obviously affected by the presence of the spiral spacers. The energy production in the MFC with the spiral spacers reached 0.071 or 0.073. kWh/kg COD in either vertical or horizontal installment. The examination of the MFCs installed in an aeration tank of a municipal wastewater treatment plant confirmed the advantage of using the spiral spacers. Those results demonstrate that spiral spacers could be an effective approach to improve energy production in MFCs. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.


Lundberg L.A.,Veolia Water North America
Proceedings of the Air and Waste Management Association's Annual Conference and Exhibition, AWMA | Year: 2010

With increased emphasis on productive use of renewable resources, it is important to understand the potential for energy recovery from the processing of biosolids generated at a wastewater treatment plant. A discussion on options for deriving energy from biosolids covers methane-rich biogas produced by anaerobic digestion; technologies available for generating power from anaerobic digester gas; gasification systems that process wood and other biomass fuels; combination or hybrid systems; comparative energy balances for alternatives; relative energy recovery efficiency; operational characteristics; emerging technologies; and practical limitations, advantages and disadvantages will be reviewed. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the 103rd Air and Waste Management Association Annual Conference and Exhibition (Calgary, Alberta, Canada 6/22-25/2010).


Zhang F.,University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee | Ge Z.,University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee | Grimaud J.,Veolia Water North America | Hurst J.,Veolia Water North America | He Z.,University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee
Environmental Science and Technology | Year: 2013

Two 4 L tubular microbial fuel cells (MFCs) were installed in a municipal wastewater treatment facility and operated for more than 400 days on primary effluents. Both MFCs removed 65-70% chemical oxygen demand (COD) at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 11 h and reduced about 50% suspended solids. The COD removal rates were about 0.4 (total) or 0.2 (soluble) kg m-3 day -1. They could handle fluctuation, such as emptying the anode for 1-3 days or different HRTs. The preliminary analysis of energy production and consumption indicated that the two MFCs could theoretically achieve a positive energy balance and energy consumption could be reduced using larger tubing connectors. Through linkage to a denitrifying MFC, the MFC system improved the removal of total nitrogen from 27.1 to 76.2%; however, the energy production substantially decreased because of organic consumption in the denitrifying MFC. Establishing a carbon (electron) balance revealed that sulfate reduction was a major electron scavenger (37-64%) and methane production played a very minor role (1.3-3.3%) in electron distribution. These results demonstrate the technical viability of MFC technology outside the laboratory and its potential advantages in low energy consumption, low sludge production, and energy recovery from wastes. © 2013 American Chemical Society.


Yarlott M.W.,Veolia Water North America
AIChE Annual Meeting, Conference Proceedings | Year: 2011

Subjective Risk analysis has been a key component of Veolia Water North America's successful strategy to identify and manage physical system risk since 2003. The strategy is based on sound principals that tap into the capacity of humans to accurately assess risk on well defined and specific situations. Using this principal, along with a facilitated procedure to divide physical processes into functional systems, identifying system failure scenarios, and rating those scenarios, Veolia has been able to quickly prioritize where to invest capital funds, purchase critical spares, develop safety/emergency planning, and prioritize work to mitigate risk at plants across North America.

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