Venetian Oncological Institute

Padova, Italy

Venetian Oncological Institute

Padova, Italy

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Gennari R.,AuslRomagna | Griguolo G.,Venetian Oncological Institute | Griguolo G.,University of Padua | Dieci M.V.,Venetian Oncological Institute | And 7 more authors.
European Journal of Surgical Oncology | Year: 2016

Fat grafting in the surgical treatment of breast cancer has become popular in a short period of time because of the rising expectations of good esthetic results by the patients as well as the simplicity of the technique; however, the oncological safety for breast cancer patients remains a matter of debate. The procedure raises many questions considering that recent in-vitro studies have shown that fat grafting could promote tumor recurrence through diverse mechanisms, or even facilitate distant metastasis. We present a review of the currently available experimental and clinical data in order to describe and discuss patient selection criteria following breast cancer surgery. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd.


Spillane A.J.,University of Sydney | Spillane A.J.,Melanoma Institute Australia | Spillane A.J.,Materials Hospital | Spillane A.J.,Royal Prince Alfred Hospital | And 6 more authors.
Annals of Surgical Oncology | Year: 2011

Background: A modified procedure for ilio-inguinal regional lymph node dissection (I-I RLND) involving 2 small skin incisions was evaluated with the aim of assessing surgical and oncological noninferiority compared with the traditional single, longitudinal incision I-I RLND. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 melanoma patients with positive groin lymph nodes who had traditional I-I RLND were compared with 20 patients who had a minimal access I-I RLND using 2 small surgical access incisions of 3-6 cm in length-one sited below and one above the inguinal ligament. Clinical, staging features, number of lymph nodes retrieved, length of hospital stay, time drains remained in situ, morbidity (wound infections, dehiscence, hematoma, seroma, and lymphedema), and disease free survival were compared. Results: Patients in the groups were comparable with the exception that the minimal access I-I RLND group had a higher rate of AJCC stage N3 disease (60% vs 20%; P =.03) and more cases with extranodal spread (45% vs 15%; P =.041). After a median follow-up of 5 months (range 1-8) for the minimal access group and median 13 months (range 1-30) for the standard group there were no differences in disease-free survival (P =.13). Retrieved lymph node counts were similar (P =.34) including for the inguinal and pelvic components of the operations separately. No significant differences in wound complications or rates of early lymphedema were observed. Conclusions: At early follow-up, minimal access I-I RLND is feasible and noninferior to single longitudinal incision I-I RLND in regard to surgical morbidity and oncological outcome. Further evaluation is progressing. © 2010 Society of Surgical Oncology.


Sini V.,University of Rome La Sapienza | Sini V.,Santo Spirito Hospital | Conte P.,Venetian Oncological Institute | Conte P.,University of Padua | And 4 more authors.
Critical Reviews in Oncology/Hematology | Year: 2016

Current international guidelines recommend endocrine therapy as the initial treatment of choice in hormone receptor positive advanced breast cancer. Endocrine therapy has been a mainstay of hormone responsive breast cancer treatment for more than a century. To date it is based on different approaches,such as blocking the estrogen receptor through selective receptor estrogen modulators, depleting extragonadal peripheral estrogen synthesis by aromatase inhibitors or inducing estrogen receptor degradation using selective down-regulators.Despite estrogen and/or progesterone receptor positive status, up to a quarter of patients could be either primarily resistant to hormone therapies or will develop hormone resistance during the course of their disease. Different mechanisms, either intrinsic or acquired, could be implicated in endocrine resistance.In the present work available endocrine therapies and their appropriate sequences have been reviewed, and the most promising strategies to overcome endocrine resistance have been highlighted. © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.


Pasello G.,Venetian Oncological Institute | Carli P.,Ca Foncello Hospital | Canova F.,Venetian Oncological Institute | Bonanno L.,Venetian Oncological Institute | And 6 more authors.
Anticancer Research | Year: 2015

Background/Aim: Most patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC) experience relapse within one year after first-line treatment. The aim of this study was to describe activity and safety of second-line with epirubicin at 70 mg/m2 followed by paclitaxel at 135 mg/m2 on day 1 every three weeks for a maximum of six cycles. Patients and Methods: This is a retrospective review of all patients with SCLC evaluated for second-line treatment between 2003 and 2013 at our Institution. Results: Sixty-eight patients received the study regimen of epirubicin with paclitaxel. We observed partial response in 19 (30%), stable disease in 22 (34%) and total early failure rate in 23 (36%) patients. Median progression free and overall survival were 21.8 and 26.5 weeks, respectively. Haematological toxicities were as follows: grade 3-4 leukopenia and neutropenia in 18 (31%) and 30 (22%) of patients, respectively; grade 3 anaemia and grade 4 thrombocytopenia were reported in 2 (3%) and 5 (9%) of patients, respectively. Conclusion: Epirubicin with paclitaxel is an active and tolerable second-line regimen in patients with SCLC. © 2015, International Institute of Anticancer Research. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Venetian Oncological Institute, Ca Foncello Hospital and University of Padua
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Anticancer research | Year: 2015

Most patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC) experience relapse within one year after first-line treatment. The aim of this study was to describe activity and safety of second-line with epirubicin at 70 mg/m(2) followed by paclitaxel at 135 mg/m(2) on day 1 every three weeks for a maximum of six cycles.This is a retrospective review of all patients with SCLC evaluated for second-line treatment between 2003 and 2013 at our Institution.Sixty-eight patients received the study regimen of epirubicin with paclitaxel. We observed partial response in 19 (30%), stable disease in 22 (34%) and total early failure rate in 23 (36%) patients. Median progression free and overall survival were 21.8 and 26.5 weeks, respectively. Haematological toxicities were as follows: grade 3-4 leukopenia and neutropenia in 18 (31%) and 30 (22%) of patients, respectively; grade 3 anaemia and grade 4 thrombocytopenia were reported in 2 (3%) and 5 (9%) of patients, respectively.Epirubicin with paclitaxel is an active and tolerable second-line regimen in patients with SCLC.

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