Veer Chandra Singh Garhwali Government Medical science and Research Institute

Srīnagar, India

Veer Chandra Singh Garhwali Government Medical science and Research Institute

Srīnagar, India

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Pandey V.,Veer Chandra Singh Garhwali Government Medical science and Research Institute | Dutt H.K.,Kannur Medical College | Singh G.,P.A. College | Vinod A.P.,Kannur Medical College
Journal of Applied Pharmaceutical Science | Year: 2017

Higher blood electrolyte Na+ and K+ levels and disturbance in Body Mass Index (BMI), both are associated with risks of various health complications such as hypertension, coronary artery diseases, type 2 diabetes, hyperlipidemia and mortality. This study was conducted to find out any correlation between the blood level of these electrolytes and BMI so that better adjustment of these parameters can reduce the morbidity as well as mortality of these serious health complications. 204 healthy volunteers participated in the study. History regarding diet and life style was noted in the form of questionnaire. Height and weight of the patient and blood pressure was recorded. Blood was collected in a sterile vial for blood Na+ and K+ levels. Data analysis showed a negative correlation of Na+ and K+ levels with BMI. The study showed a significant positive correlation of BMI with blood pressure. It was also found that Na+ has positive correlation and K+ has negative correlation with systolic blood pressure. The study concludes that there is a strong association of BMI with blood Na+ and K+ levels and blood pressure. We need to spread awareness about BMI and electrolytes imbalance in the community to prevent the related complications. © 2017 Vijay Pandey et al.


Garg R.,Veer Chandra Singh Garhwali Government Medical science and Research Institute | Deepti S.,Government of Punjab | Padda A.,Government of Punjab | Singh T.,Government of Punjab
Breastfeeding Medicine | Year: 2010

Objectives: Irrespective of the fact that breastfeeding in India is almost universal, psychosocial and cultural barriers still exists to early breastfeeding. The exact reasons for this delay are not clearly known. Hence we conducted this study to assess breastfeeding knowledge and practices and the factors influencing them among women in rural Punjab, India. Methodology: We interviewed 1,000 women in a community-based analytical cross-sectional study that was carried out in 20 villages of the District of Amritsar, Punjab, India, in 2005-2006 by standard cluster sampling. Time at initiation of breastfeeding and variables like understanding about the importance of colostrum, nutrition during lactation, and motivation by health workers were assessed. Statistical analysis was done by percentages compared with the χ2 test. Results: Two hundred twenty-five respondents (23.8%) started breastfeeding their babies on the first day of birth, but in terms of early breastfeeding only 128 (13.5%) respondents put their babies on the breast within 4 hours of birth. Of the 1,000 respondents, 356 (35.6%) of the respondents were unaware of the importance of colostrum, 733 (77.6%) were not given advice on benefits of breastfeeding/weaning, and 306 (33.5%) of respondents had not increased their diet during lactation. Conclusions: Early breastfeeding knowledge and practices were suboptimal among the mothers in rural Punjab. Health education on breastfeeding and nutrition remains the dark area. Research and public health efforts like one-to-one "breastfeeding counseling and health education on nutrition" to the mother by health workers should be promoted. © 2010, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.


Juyal D.,Veer Chandra Singh Garhwali Government Medical science and Research Institute | Thawani V.,Veer Chandra Singh Garhwali Government Medical science and Research Institute | Thaledi S.,Seema Dental College and Hospital
North American Journal of Medical Sciences | Year: 2015

Background: Publishing research papers for academic fraternity has become important for career advancement and promotion. Number of publications in peer reviewed journals and subsequent citations are recognized as measures of scientifi c success. Non-publishing academicians and researchers are invisible to the scientifi c community. Discussion: With pressure to publish, misconduct has crept into scientifi c writing with the result that research misconduct, plagiarism, misappropriation of intellectual property, and substantial unattributed textual copying of another’s publication have become common. The Offi ce of Research Integrity, USA, defi nes research misconduct as “fabrication, falsifi cation or plagiarism in proposing, performing or reviewing research, or in reporting research results.” Although plagiarism is diffi cult to defi ne in few words, it can be viewed as the stealing of another person’s ideas, methods, results, or words without giving proper attribution. The Offi ce of Research Integrity defi nes plagiarism as being “theft or misappropriation of intellectual property and the substantial unattributed textual copying of another’s work.” Plagiarism is one of the most vehemently derided breaches of research integrity as it undermines the original and honest contribution to an existing body of knowledge. Conclusion: Plagiarism has many forms viz. blatant plagiarism, technical plagiarism, patchwork plagiarism, and self-plagiarism. In any form, the plagiarism is a threat to the research integrity and is unacceptable. We do need to detect such acts and effectively prosecute the offenders. © 2015, North American Journal of Medical Sciences. All rights reserved.


Juyal D.,Veer Chandra Singh Garhwali Government Medical science and Research Institute | Thaledi S.,Maharishi Markandeshwar Institute of Medical science and Research | Thawani V.,Lata Medical Research Foundation
Education for Health: Change in Learning and Practice | Year: 2013

A case report is a description of a clinical case that has unique features. It may include a previously unreported clinical condition or observation of a disease, a unique use of imaging or diagnostic tool to reveal a disease, a new therapeutic intervention of a known disease, a previously unreported complication of a disease, or a new adverse event from a medication. A case report should be crisp, focused, and include few figures and references. A case report generally has a short unstructured or no abstract, a brief or no introduction, a description of the case, a discussion and a brief conclusion. Case reports are valuable sources of new and unusual information that may stimulate further research and applicability to clinical practice. Writing case reports properly is important if they are to be accepted by journals and credible and useful to readers.


Dimri D.,Veer Chandra Singh Garhwali Government Medical Science and Research Institute | Gupta A.,Veer Chandra Singh Garhwali Government Medical Science and Research Institute | Singh A.K.,Veer Chandra Singh Garhwali Government Medical Science and Research Institute
Dermatology Research and Practice | Year: 2016

Background. The aim of present study was to describe the profile of leprosy patients attending the outpatient department of dermatology in tertiary care hospital in Srinagar, Uttarakhand, North India. Methodology. This descriptive retrospective study. Patient data at the time of diagnosis were retrieved onto a predesigned proforma, which concerned the following variables at the time of registration: age, sex, and residence. Newly registered outpatients leprosy cases between 2009 and 2014 were included in the study. Results. It was found that 65 were multibacillary leprosy cases. Males constituted 62.8% of all leprosy cases. The majority (83.7%) belonged to the age group of 18-60 years. Of the total 48.8% of the new leprosy cases were from the Pauri district. The leprosy incidence rate in this population was 2.71 per 1000 patients. Conclusion. Leprosy still continues to be a communicable disease of concern. The lower incidence in women and children provokes the need to strengthen contact screening, early case detection, and referral activities in the population to sustain elimination. Copyright © 2016 Deepak Dimri et al.


Chaudhari S.,Veer Chandra Singh Garhwali Government Medical science and Research Institute | Hatwal D.,Veer Chandra Singh Garhwali Government Medical science and Research Institute | Suri V.,Veer Chandra Singh Garhwali Government Medical science and Research Institute
Iranian Journal of Kidney Diseases | Year: 2013

Primary sarcomas of kidney are rare tumors accounting for 1% to 3% of all primary renal malignancies. Among sarcomas fibrosarcoma is rare. Here we report a case of primary fibrosarcoma of the kidney in a 70-year-old man who presented with gradually increasing abdominal swelling and pain.


Juyal D.,Veer Chandra Singh Garhwali Government Medical science and Research Institute | Sharma M.,Veer Chandra Singh Garhwali Government Medical science and Research Institute | Pal S.,Veer Chandra Singh Garhwali Government Medical science and Research Institute | Rathaur V.K.,Veer Chandra Singh Garhwali Government Medical science and Research Institute | Sharma N.,Veer Chandra Singh Garhwali Government Medical science and Research Institute
North American Journal of Medical Sciences | Year: 2013

Background: Candida species are one of the most common causes of blood stream infections among neonates and account for 9-13% of such infections. Although Candida albicans remains the most common fungal isolate from neonatal candidemia, longitudinal studies have detected a shift towards non-albicans Candida (NAC) species. Aim: To examine the prevalence and epidemiology of candidemia among infants admitted to our hospital. Materials and Methods: Blood samples were collected from 548 neonates and only those which yielded pure growth of Candida spp. were included in the study. The isolates were identified as per standard mycological techniques and antifungal susceptibility (AFS) was done by disc diffusion method. Results: Of the total 132 neonates included in the study, NAC species were responsible for 80.30% cases with C. parapsilosis (25.0%) and C. tropicalis (21.97%) as the most predominant species; whereas 19.70% of cases were caused by C. albicans. AFS results revealed that 65.91, 73.49, and 96.21% isolates were sensitive to fluconazole (FLK), itraconazole (ITR), and amphotericin B (AMB), respectively. Conclusion: Candidemia in neonates is an ominous prognostic sign and is an important entity in our hospital. Strict infection control strategies, appropriate preventive and therapeutic measures such as prophylactic antifungal use and a restrictive policy of antibiotic use should be implemented.


Juyal D.,Veer Chandra Singh Garhwali Government Medical science and Research Institute
Education for health (Abingdon, England) | Year: 2013

A case report is a description of a clinical case that has unique features. It may include a previously unreported clinical condition or observation of a disease, a unique use of imaging or diagnostic tool to reveal a disease, a new therapeutic intervention of a known disease, a previously unreported complication of a disease, or a new adverse event from a medication. A case report should be crisp, focused, and include few figures and references. A case report generally has a short unstructured or no abstract, a brief or no introduction, a description of the case, a discussion and a brief conclusion. Case reports are valuable sources of new and unusual information that may stimulate further research and applicability to clinical practice. Writing case reports properly is important if they are to be accepted by journals and credible and useful to readers.


Saxena A.,Veer Chandra Singh Garhwali Government Medical Science and Research Institute | Thawani V.,Lata Medical Research Foundation | Chakrabarty M.,PGIMER | Gharpure K.,Government Medical College
Journal of Pharmacology and Pharmacotherapeutics | Year: 2013

Worthiness of any scientific journal is measured by the quality of the articles published in it. The Impact factor (IF) is one popular tool which analyses the quality of journal in terms of citations received by its published articles. It is usually assumed that journals with high IF carry meaningful, prominent, and quality research. Since IF does not assess a single contribution but the whole journal, the evaluation of research authors should not be influenced by the IF of the journal. The h index, g index, m quotient, c index are some other alternatives to judge the quality of an author. These address the shortcomings of IF viz. number of citations received by an author, active years of publication, length of academic career and citations received for recent articles. Quality being the most desirable aspect for evaluating an author's work over the active research phase, various indices has attempted to accommodate different possible variables. However, each index has its own merits and demerits. We review the available indices, find the fallacies and to correct these, hereby propose the Original Research Performance Index (ORPI) for evaluation of an author's original work which can also take care of the bias arising because of self-citations, gift authorship, inactive phase of research, and length of non-productive period in research.


Venkatashivareddy B.,Veer Chandra Singh Garhwali Government Medical science and Research Institute | Gupta A.,Veer Chandra Singh Garhwali Government Medical science and Research Institute | Singh A.K.,Veer Chandra Singh Garhwali Government Medical science and Research Institute
Clinical Epidemiology and Global Health | Year: 2015

Background: Uttarakhand is largely a hilly state, having diversity of disease. Due to low income, lack of knowledge, difficult terrains and lack of proper transport, the sick population cannot visit health institutions. These paved the search for more effective ways of delivering public primary health care and achieving universal health coverage. Objective: The main objective of the study is to demonstrate a model to identify and manage health problems of the poor people living in hard to reach areas of Uttarakhand, through specialized health camps as an approach for universal health coverage and to demonstrate a cost-effective model. Material and methods: The community-based health camp was organized in 2015 to address medical problems of the people of Ragdi village, Uttarakhand. Information like age, gender, residence and principal diagnosis were extracted from the camp registers coded as per ICD 10. We estimated model specialist end cost of the health camp and patient end cost for seeking treatment at the health facility. The cost effectiveness analysis was done. Results: The health camp saw the attendance of 233 patients. The average distance travelled by patients to seek treatment care was 1.3. km, S.D. 2.1. The mean time to reach the health camp by walking was 17.2. min, S.D. 27.3. Overall the musculoskeletal disorders were the most common (26.6%), followed by the respiratory (17.2%), eye (14.2%) and others. Estimated per-patient specialist end cost was 2.2 US$. The per-patient end cost varied from 4 to 5 US$ for primary and secondary care and 6 to 9 US$ for tertiary care. Conclusion: The health camp with specialist services is a cost-effective way to bridge the major gap in achieving universal health coverage in difficult to reach hilly areas. © 2015 INDIACLEN.

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