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South San Francisco, CA, United States

VaxGen was a biopharmaceutical company based in the San Francisco Bay Area.On July 28, 2010, VaxGen Inc. was acquired by diaDexus, Inc., in a reverse merger transaction. VaxGen, Inc. does not have significant operations. The company seeks to enter into a strategic transaction or series of strategic transactions. Previously, it was engaged in the development of vaccines that immunize against infectious disease. The company was founded in 1995 and was based in South San Francisco, California. Wikipedia.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 2.00M | Year: 2003

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): An effective vaccine is the only practical way to halt the AIDS epidemic. The greatest challenge in developing an effective HIV vaccine is antigenic variation. Therefore, the present project aim is to enhance the understanding of antigenic variation by characterizing intra-subtype sequence variation among gpl20 genes from incident (new) infections, and identifying novel antigens that will be manufactured and advanced into clinical trails. Samples will be collected from VaxGen's current Phase III U.S. AIDS vaccine clinical trials. Amino acid sequences will be analyzed using new software that maps sequence variation onto the 3D crystal structure of gp120 to define substitutions that may alter the antigenic profile. This study will provide a database of virus sequences currently circulating throughout North America, with reference to approximate time of infection, geographic distribution, and the nature of source material. These data will aid in incorporating new antigens to improve current HIV vaccine efficacy against variants of subtype B by guiding selection of the most appropriate envelope antigens for next generation HIV vaccines.


News Article | March 28, 2008
Site: www.siliconbeat.com

Few biotech companies have offered as much promise and delivered as much disappointment as South San Francisco’s VaxGen. Founded in 1995, it started out on a promising quest to use synthetic proteins in an HIV vaccine. But after eight years of development and tests, the product, AIDSVAX, turned out to do nothing. Then in 2002 and 2003, amid lingering the post-9/11 fears, federal officials gave VaxGen $101.2 million to start developing a new anthrax vaccine. In 2004, the government followed up with an $877.5 million contract — the largest awarded under President Bush’s Project BioShield — to provide 75 million doses of the vaccine. That tidy bit of business came crashing down in December 2006 after the vaccine was found not to be ready for human testing, as promised. The government revoked the contract, and the company cut its workforce by about 90 percent. In November, after casting about for some way to survive, VaxGen put its hopes in a proposed merger with neighboring Raven Biotechnologies, which is working on cancer treatments. Initial reaction seemed positive, but opposition soon cropped up among shareholders of both companies, and by today, when VaxGen had scheduled the stockholders meeting that it hoped would seal the deal, it was clear that like the HIV vaccine and the anthrax vaccine, this too was not going to work. “We are obviously very disappointed that the proposed merger with Raven was not approved by our stockholders,” said James Panek, VaxGen’s chief executive officer, in a statement. “Despite the strong support of some institutions and solid support by so many individual investors, it has become quite clear that there is sufficient opposition, such that this merger will not be approved.” The prognosis for recovery is grim. VaxGen’s board said it would “immediately assess the company’s strategic alternatives, including a possible liquidation of the company.”


NEW YORK--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Pfizer Inc. announced today that Kathrin U. Jansen, Ph.D., has been appointed Senior Vice President, Vaccine Research & Development, and will be responsible for leading all Pfizer vaccine research and development programs, effective June 1st, 2015. Dr. Jansen will report directly to Mikael Dolsten, M.D., Ph.D., President of Worldwide Research and Development at Pfizer, and will be based in Pfizer’s Pearl River, New York research site. “With over two decades of experience as a vaccine researcher, Kathrin is a world-class scientist with a remarkable track-record of delivering first-in-class vaccines in areas with serious unmet patient need such as human papillomavirus infection and Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B,” said Dr. Dolsten. “She has also played a pivotal role in advancing Pfizer’s Staphylococcus aureus and Clostridium difficile vaccine candidate programs, the licensure of Prevnar 13 in both infant and adult indications, and the development of the diagnostic assays that enabled the CAPiTAi. I am confident that she will continue to lead our Vaccine Research organization with a sharp focus on delivering potential vaccine breakthroughs for infectious diseases.” Dr. Jansen was previously Chief Scientific Officer of Pfizer’s Vaccine Research and Early Development Research Unit. Dr. Jansen’s Pfizer career started when she joined Wyeth, now a wholly owned subsidiary of Pfizer, in 2006, where she was responsible for leading vaccine research with a focus on infectious disease targets, early development and clinical testing. Earlier in her career, Dr. Jansen served as VaxGen's Chief Scientific Officer and Senior Vice President for Research and Development and also directed a number of vaccine research efforts at Merck Research Laboratories, including the company’s novel bacterial vaccine programs. Her efforts led to the licensure of the world's first cervical cancer vaccine for the prevention of human papillomavirus infection (HPV). “There is a remarkable scientific opportunity in vaccine research ahead of us and Pfizer’s vaccine research and development team is fully focused on addressing major neonatal, infant, adolescent and adult infections and pioneering therapeutic immunotherapy across diseases including cancer,” said Dr. Jansen. “We are building on the rich foundation of our scientific heritage with Prevnar and other vaccines to design and develop vaccine candidates that are unique - and most importantly - with the potential to significantly improve patients’ lives.” Dr. Jansen received her doctoral degree in microbiology, biochemistry and genetics from Phillips Universität, Marburg, Germany. Following completion of her formal training and postdoctoral work at the Institute for Mikrobiologie in Marburg, Dr. Jansen continued her postdoctoral training with Professor G.P. Hess at Cornell University. She then joined the Glaxo Institute for Molecular Biology in Geneva, Switzerland. Since 2010, Dr. Jansen has been adjunct professor at the University of Pennsylvania School Of Medicine. Dr. Jansen will succeed Dr. Emilio Emini, who has accepted a position at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation as the head of their HIV program. Dr. Jansen will lead an organization of approximately 550 colleagues comprised of clinicians, vaccine process/analytical/and formulation development, and other laboratory scientists. Vaccine Research and Development Unit includes Vaccine Research and Early Development, Vaccine Immunotherapeutics, Vaccine Clinical Research and Vaccine Operations and High Throughput Clinical Testing. As of February 2015, Pfizer’s clinical vaccine pipeline includes five programs from Phase I through III targeting diseases caused by Staph aureus, Clostridium difficile and Meningitis B, as well as smoking cessation and asthma. Pfizer Inc.: Working together for a healthier world® At Pfizer, we apply science and our global resources to bring therapies to people that extend and significantly improve their lives. We strive to set the standard for quality, safety and value in the discovery, development and manufacture of health care products. Our global portfolio includes medicines and vaccines as well as many of the world's best-known consumer health care products. Every day, Pfizer colleagues work across developed and emerging markets to advance wellness, prevention, treatments and cures that challenge the most feared diseases of our time. Consistent with our responsibility as one of the world's premier innovative biopharmaceutical companies, we collaborate with health care providers, governments and local communities to support and expand access to reliable, affordable health care around the world. For more than 150 years, Pfizer has worked to make a difference for all who rely on us. To learn more, please visit us at www.pfizer.com. DISCLOSURE NOTICE: The information contained in this release is as of April 6, 2015. Pfizer assumes no obligation to update forward-looking statements contained in this release as the result of new information or future events or developments. This release contains forward-looking information about Pfizer’s research and development and pipeline of vaccines that involve substantial risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed or implied by such statements. Risks and uncertainties include, among other things, the uncertainties inherent in research and development, including, without limitation, the ability to meet anticipated clinical trial commencement and completion dates as well as the possibility of unfavorable clinical trial results, including unfavorable new clinical data and additional analyses of existing clinical data; whether and when regulatory submissions may be made in any jurisdictions for any of these pipeline products; whether and when such applications may be approved by regulatory authorities, which will depend on the assessment by such regulatory authorities of the benefit-risk profile suggested by the totality of the efficacy and safety information submitted; decisions by regulatory authorities regarding labeling and other matters that could affect the availability or commercial potential of any of these pipeline products; and competitive developments. A further description of risks and uncertainties can be found in Pfizer's Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2014 and in its subsequent reports on Form 10-Q, including in the sections thereof captioned "Risk Factors" and "Forward-Looking Information That May Affect Future Results", as well as in its subsequent reports on Form 8-K, all of which are filed with the SEC and available at www.sec.gov and www.pfizer.com.


News Article | March 5, 2009
Site: www.siliconbeat.com

Remember VaxGen, the South San Francisco firm that won an $877.5 billion federal contract in 2004 to make an anthrax vaccine only to have the money yanked away two years later when it missed a deadline for testing the vaccine? The poor company has been on the skids ever since. It laid off most of its workforce. And when it tried to merge with its neighbor, Raven biotechnologies, it had to drop the idea last year after some of its major stockholders objected. Now, what’s left of VaxGen is in beef with its landlord. In a recent filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, VaxGen said ts landlord is trying to terminate VaxGen’s lease at 349 Oyster Point Boulevard. How far the once-high flying company has fallen.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 210.00K | Year: 2002

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): An effective vaccine is the only practical way to halt the AIDS epidemic. The greatest challenge in developing an effective HIV vaccine is antigenic variation. Therefore, the present project aim is to enhance the understanding of antigenic variation by characterizing intra-subtype sequence variation among gpl20 genes from incident (new) infections, and identifying novel antigens that will be manufactured and advanced into clinical trails. Samples will be collected from VaxGen's current Phase III U.S. AIDS vaccine clinical trials. Amino acid sequences will be analyzed using new software that maps sequence variation onto the 3D crystal structure of gp120 to define substitutions that may alter the antigenic profile. This study will provide a database of virus sequences currently circulating throughout North America, with reference to approximate time of infection, geographic distribution, and the nature of source material. These data will aid in incorporating new antigens to improve current HIV vaccine efficacy against variants of subtype B by guiding selection of the most appropriate envelope antigens for next generation HIV vaccines.

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